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Jeremy Walker

Jeremy Walker

Site Administrator
Birmingham, UK.
Co-founder and CEO of Meducation. If you have any questions, ideas or problems, or just want to say hello, please email me at jeremy@meducation.net.

Where else can you find me?

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The Growth Of Online Medical Education Resources

Introduction Over the last three years there has been a rapid increase in the amount of medical education resources on the web. The contributors tend to fall into three main areas: Individuals or small groups producing material Large organisations / universities producing material Organisations creating sites (such as Meducation) which are one-stop-shops for content and act as a portal for other sites. Individuals Most students are required to produce and present a certain amount of educational material during their studies. Many, therefore, end up with PowerPoints and documents on various topics. The more ambitious may create videos: either animations in flash, or more real-life videos that demonstrate something such as an examination technical. Some of these students enjoy this so much that they have developed sites dedicated to such material. Sites such as Podmedics and Surgery and Medicine are examples of students who have grouped together to upload their work to a central place where it can be shared in the community. They advertise on Facebook and Twitter and gain a small following. Large Organisations And Universities Some organisations have realised that there is a market for the production of multimedia resources and have invested time and money into producing them. Companies such as MD Kiosh and ORLive run subscription services for high quality videos and have developed full time businesses around this work. Universities have also realised the potential for creating high quality media and some, such as the University of California and the University of Wisconsin, have invested into television-like streams, trying to tap in to the students natural viewing habits. As time goes on it seems likely that most medical education will move away from textbooks and towards the multimedia resources. There will always be a need for the written word but it is likely that it will become more incorporated into other forms of media, such as presentations and annotated videos. One-Stop-Shops The final, and possibly most influential type of contributor is the social network / portal site. Here, all the information from around the web is culminated in one place, where users can go to find what they are looking for These sites act as portals for all the other types of site and help spread their reach well beyond their local community. Here at Meducation, we have contributors from over 100 countries and pride ourselves on making easy-to-find resources for everyone. As time goes on and more users start to discover portal sites, more traffic will flood to the sites they support and the whole infrastructure can grow incrementally.  
Jeremy Walker
over 7 years ago
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What Does The Perfect Online Exam Revision Site Look Like?

Over 20% of UK medical students have used our exam room to revise. It's one of the most heavily utilised parts of Meducation and one of the most popular. But it's been a while since we did any work on it, something that we're about to rectify! We want to give you the opportunity to tell us how to make it even better! What's There Already? To recap where we're at currently. We have: Thousands of questions (a mixture of SBAs, MCQs and EMQs) split into over 30 categories. You can take exams of between 10 and 50 questions. You can time your exam if you're Premium You can compare your results in each question to the rest of the community and, if you're Premium, your medical school or year. You can comment on questions and vote them up or down. What Do You Want Improving? So this is your opportunity. What does a perfect online exam revision section look like? What features would you love? What annoys you? We want make the perfect section to help you practice for your exams, so please tell us what you want included. Post a comment below with your ideas on. If you agree with what someone else has said, please vote their comment up. Those that get voted up lots, we'll definitely try and implement!  
Jeremy Walker
over 4 years ago
2da3fbaf6712b61fc62e3a65d9454f3f
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Full Disclosure

I read a BBC article today about a doctor who had filmed examinations of women for voyeuristic purposes. One quote in particular stood out: "We had the challenge of identifying and locating a large number of women and explaining to them that their examinations had been secretly recorded by Bains for the purpose of his sexual gratification. It was horrendous. They were unaware that they were victims and this dated back over a three-year period." At least 30 women have been contacted to be told they were victims of someone's perversion. Until they were told, they had no idea they were victims. Only upon being told will they feel disgust and violation, not to mention distrust over future consultations. It reminded me of a discussion recently on here where a student was telling us about an experience where they saw a patient with horrific stitching and scarring after surgery. The doctor told the patient that it all looked like it was healing fine, then after the patient left, commented to the student that the stitching was some of the worst they'd ever seen. Was the doctor lying or being compassionate? Should the police tell the perverted doctor's victims, or leave them in peaceful ignorance? As I patient - I think I'd just rather not know, but I believe many doctors would argue that full disclosure is essential, especially in light of the Francis Report. I would be interested in medics' views, from ethical, procedural and "real-world" points of view.  
Jeremy Walker
over 4 years ago
1a227ad5c14749b10787c7ad9e6892e9
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oPortfolio - A Better Portfolio For Medics

What's the problem? Since I first started working with doctors, one of the main complaints I've heard is about electronic portfolios: "It's so slow", "It's really ugly", "It's basically unusable", "It crashed the day before submissions!", "It's SO unintuitive" I've heard all of these things from different doctors at different stages in different specialities in different locations. Write a tweet about ePortfolio and the odds are you'll have it retweeted and replied to numerous times within minutes. There's clearly a real problem here, and a real frustration among doctors! What's the Solution? Over the last two years I've spent lots of time talking to a variety of doctors about this and have come to the conclusion that a new modern, robust solution is needed. We need software that is fresh and intuitive to use, that doesn't get overloaded and that has the features that people actually want! The Meducation team agrees, and so we've partnered up with our friends at Podmedics to make this a reality. We are making oPortfolio - the Open Portfolio - an open-source system guided by the needs of the trusts, deanaries and colleges, but with a firm focus on the doctors who will be using it. Over the next few days we'll be launching a kickstarter project to let you support what we're doing. In the meantime, please sign up on our website to receive updates about what we're doing!  
Jeremy Walker
over 4 years ago
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Will oPortfolio do XYZ? You're asking the wrong question...

This is a post about oPortfolio - a project that Meducation and Podmedics are collaborating on. We have a Kickstarter project and would love your support! The Wrong Question Lots of people have been asking "will oPortfolio do XYZ?". As an open-source software developer I always find that a strange question, because there is very rarely a yes or no answer - the answer is pretty much always "it could do". Most people aren't used to having software made for them. Especially in the NHS, people have to live with often outdated systems that are enforced on them. Change involves committees and boards that they have no real access to. The open source world is very very different. You get to choose what features you want in the product - you simply need to ask. With oPortfolio, we are going to be guided by what doctors and students want. If a feature matters to lots of you, then we're going to work hard to get it in ASAP. If only one person wants it, then it's less likely to get priortised. Right now, the quickest way to get your voice heard is to support us on Kickstarter. When we reach our total, we'll be emailing everyone who's supported us to ask what the most important features are. If you want to make sure you're heard - that's the best way to do it. The Right Question In case you're wondering, a better question is "How can I help you get XYZ into oPortfolio?". Open Source is about people collaborating to make something better, expecting nothing in return. We'll write the code, but your input, support and guidance is what will make this happen. Will oPortfolio do XYZ? Quite simply, yes it probably will, if you drum up some support for the idea and come and talk to us about it. Please support us today. Thank you.  
Jeremy Walker
about 4 years ago
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Who is oPortfolio aimed at?

This is a post about oPortfolio - a project that Meducation and Podmedics are collaborating on. We have a Kickstarter project and would love your support! Students? Junior Doctors? Senior Doctors? Over the last two days we've been asked by lots of people who oPortfolio is for. Some people want it for students, others to replace junior doctor systems, and some for revalidation purposes. The simple answer is that it's for everyone going through their medical careers from student to consultant and on to retirement. Challenges There are two challenges to building a system that's relevant for such a wide variety of people. The first is to make something that has all the features that are needed for all the people. We are strong believers in self-directed learning and want that to be at the core of oPortfolio. We want people to be able to build their own personal portfolios, keeping a log of everything they want to - their own personal space for reflection and learning. oPortfolio should be something that you find useful at all stages, and that's crucial to our vision. The second challenge is working with existing ePortfolio systems, and to have functionality that deaneries and Colleges need to adopt our platform if they want to. Making a system that is incompatible with existing systems, or that involves doctors still having to use other horrible software defies the whole point of what we're doing. If a user's oPortfolio has to be manually copied & pasted into another system, everyone loses out. This, therefore, also has to be a large consideration as we move forwards. At all times, we will have to balance these two challenges up against each other. Conclusion oPortfolio is for everyone. It certainly won't have all the features that everyone needs from day one, but our aim is to build a solid base everyone can use, and then expand it from there. With regards to who we give our initial focus to, it will be the people who support us on Kickstarter. They are showing genuine support for what we're doing, and therefore deserve to be prioritised. That only seems fair. Please support us today. Thank you.  
Jeremy Walker
about 4 years ago
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Introducing Confidence

We've launched Confidence - a free exam room for medical students with over 3,500 questions and explanations written by expert educators.  
Jeremy Walker
over 1 year ago