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#81
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Aortic Stenosis - Heart Sounds - MEDZCOOL

This is the sound of Aortic Stenosis. Best heard with headphones  
youtube.com
3 months ago
#82
5d95646bb206b18ec1405b1abc18dc98
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Education, technology & the changing times

I was approached by Meducation to become a resident blogger, and was initially surprised by the invitation as - I must explain upfront - I am not a clinician of any type! I'm one of those project managers. So when considering where to begin to write my first blog post I decided to focus on the use of technology in medical education. Then when I began writing my first post I was reminded of the complexities of such a topic! And I realised that this is not something that can be covered in one post. So this is where I thought I would start: Technology is changing our lives at an ever increasing rate, and it is influencing the way we do a range of tasks from the use of technology in the hospital to the use of technology in education, notwithstanding all other aspects of our lives and the way we communicate. We are educating children in schools at the moment who will have careers and jobs that don't even exist at the moment, the rate of change is exponential. But with this consistent churn of information, communication and technological developments, how do you keep up? Where do you start? As a teacher, as a learner. I wanted to concentrate this post on considering some of the challenges which can be encountered when working in medical education. One of the pivotal issues is probably resistance. Resistance has a negative connotation and I use it cautiously. Resistance can be in many forms and can arise for a number of reasons. Technology brings about change, and inherently change can make people nervous. And with change you often encounter resistance; resistance to change, resistance to adapt, resistance to engage - the fear of the unknown. With an ever evolving world, where technology is infiltrating the way we live, work and learn, it is natural that this will influence the way we deliver education, including medical education. Technology is so fast moving it can considerable time to become familiar with new mediums of developing educational resources, by which time often new iterations and new technologies have arrived. However, for those providing subject matter expertise for educational resources it is essential that they under the medium through this will be delivered. And for learners, which we all are, it is important to understand how you learn and how technology can help you do this. With the changes to the NHS and developments in education technology do people find some comfort in being able to both deliver and receive education in a traditional manner? This poses a unique and very interesting challenge to answer for those involved in medical education, in trying to meet the demands of those seeking information and education in new and interesting ways with those who enjoy traditional classroom based education - all from both the point of view of the 'teacher' and the 'learner'. How to we satisfy the appetite of those seeking cutting edge education with the demand for traditional classroom learning? Is it possible to meet the needs of all?  
Megan Buckingham
almost 3 years ago
#83
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Mod 1-7. Introduction to mechanisms of cough

Apologies, previously uploaded version was of a wrong document  
Ting Joe Li Yah
about 1 year ago
#85
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Healthcare in Hippocrates’ Shadow by David Newman - SMACC DUB

The difference between bad care and good care, between a confrontation and a satisfying encounter, is in a single turn of phrase or word choice.  
smacc.net.au
about 1 year ago
#86
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Mod 1-9. Physiology and treatment of chronic ventilatory failure

Apologies, previously uploaded version was of a wrong document  
Ting Joe Li Yah
about 1 year ago
#87
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What is the largest bone in the human body?

The largest and longest bone in the human body is the femur, and it is located in the upper leg. The femur connects to the knee at one end and fits into the hip socket at the...  
ask.com
about 1 year ago
#88
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Aaron T. Beck, M.D.

A native of Providence, RI, Aaron T. Beck had an interest in the vagaries of human nature as far back as he can remember. After graduating magna cum laude from Brown University in 1942, he embarked on a career in medicine at Yale Medical School, graduating in 1946. He served a rotating internship, followed by…  
aaronbeckcenter.org
about 1 year ago
#89
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Meningitis

Definitions Meningitis – although this technically only means inflammation of the meninges, it is usually taken to mean infection. Meningitis is far more common in infants and children than in adults.   Causes There are a wide range of causes of meningism; typically: viral, bacterial and endogenous (e.g. malignancy, autoimmune disease, subarachnoid haemorrhage). Prions and protozoa can also cause the disease.  
almostadoctor.co.uk
almost 3 years ago
#90
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Osteology of the hand

After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Identify and describe bony features of the carpals, metacarpals and phalange...  
youtube.com
11 months ago
#91
A409380c1883ab76e05d2a43c101df6e82cdd35e3181065113034506
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Cell Biology 3rd edition

I think this might be useful to first year medical students  
Nkoceey Frank
12 months ago
#92
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Osteology of the Skull 9 Sphenoid Bone

This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The l...  
youtube.com
11 months ago
#93
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Scabies

Scabies aka “The Itch” Caused by the arachnid (mite) sarcotopes scabei.   Aetiology Pets – particularly dogs Other family members affected – highly contagious within families. Sexually transmitted   Presentation  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 3 years ago
#94
0828694fbb5560ef072dc03f3b083f0a
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Email Gone Astray

An email gone astray can provide fascinating insights for an unintended recipient. Written correspondence has undoubtedly fallen into the wrong hands since homo sapiens first put pigment on bark, but never before has it been so easy to have a personal message go awry. No longer is it a matter of surreptitiously steaming open sealed letters or snooping around in wastepaper baskets. Finding out another's personal business is now just a click away. Even more conveniently, candid opinions can sometimes make an unscheduled landing in your inbox, making for intriguing reading -- as I discovered. Some time ago, I'd sent out feelers regarding possible new GP jobs and had emailed a particular practice principal a couple of times, expressing interest. When it looked likely that I was going to pursue a different path, I sent a polite email explaining the situation and telling him I wouldn't be seeking an interview for a job at his practice at present. An email bounced back saying that my not wanting to work for him may be "a relief" as I "sounded a bit intense". It was sans salutation but, based on the rest of the content, was obviously intended for one of his work colleagues. It had no doubt been a simple error of his pressing 'reply' rather than 'forward'. I was chuffed: I've never been called "intense" before, at least, not to my knowledge. Perhaps there are several references to my intensity bouncing around cyberspace but this is the only one my inbox has ever captured. I've never considered myself an intense person. To me, the term conjured up the image of a passionate yet very serious type, often committed to worthy causes. Perhaps I had the definition wrong. I looked it up. The Oxford Dictionary gave me: "having or showing strong feelings or opinions; extremely earnest or serious". Unfortunately, I couldn't reconcile my almost pathologically Pollyanna-ish outlook, enthusiasm, irreverence and light-heartedness to this description -- nor my somewhat ambivalent approach to politics, religion, sport, the environment and other "serious" issues. At least the slip-up was minor. Several years ago, I unintentionally managed to proposition one of my young, shy GP registrars by way of a wayward text message. He had the same first name as my then-husband. Scrolling through my phone contacts late one night, alone in a hotel room at an interstate medical conference, I pressed one button too many. Hence this innocent fellow received not only declarations of love but a risqué suggestion to go with it. Not the usual information imparted from medical educator to registrar! It took me several days to realise my error, but despite my profuse apologies, the poor guy couldn't look me in the eye for the rest of the term. If I was "intense", I would conclude on a ponderous note -- with a moral message that would resonate with the intellectually elite. Alas, I'm a far less serious kind of girl and, as a result, the best I can up with is: Senders of emails and texts beware -- you are but one click away from being bitten on the bottom. (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor). Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work here.  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 2 years ago
#95
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The Scientific Reason You Get Cravings - And How To Fight Back!

“We have done it!” Thought James Olds, “we have found the happiness center of the brain!" The year was 1953. Olds and fellow psychologist Peter Milner had been stimulating various areas of the brains in rats to determine how different areas would affect their behavior. One day, they stimulated an area of the midbrain that the two researchers were sure was connected to happiness. Whenever they triggered it, the rats seemed to be in a state of euphoria.  
willpowered.co
about 1 year ago
#97
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Basic Hemodynamic Principles Viewed Through Pressure Volume Relations

Tutorial on Advanced Concepts in Pressure-Volumne Analysis.  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago
#98
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What is the function of spongy bone?

Spongy bone, also called cancellous or trabecular bone, provides structural support and facilitates movement of the joints and limbs. Spongy bone is light and porous and found in most parts of the...  
ask.com
about 1 year ago
#99
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In a world with no antibiotics, how did doctors treat infections?

While some ancient therapies proved effective enough that they are still used in some form today, on the whole they just aren't as good as modern antimicrobials at treating infections.  
theconversation.com
about 1 year ago
#100
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An amazing incident

It's been a while since I've added any thoughts to this blog. In that time I have finished my Obs/Gynae placement, I have spent a week on labour ward, and done my first week of my 4th year surgical placement. All the while cramming in revision between various activities and general staying alive measures. This, I feel, is how most people who are sitting their final written exams are spending their time, so I don't feel so alone. I just want to bring to the attention one amazing incident that happened on my labour ward week. I was on a night shift, there wasn't a lot going on. Absolutely everyone was knackered, the registrar who'd been on nights for the past week was just chatting to me. I have never seen someone look so tired. The emergency alarm went off and a lady had a cord prolapse, which is an obstetric emergency with a high foetal mortality rate. Now I think it's amazing that the doctor went from nearly falling asleep to switched on 'surgical-mode' in an instant, successfully performed the C-section, delivering the baby in about a minute, then went back to being absolutely knackered and let the SHO close up the wound. It just really impressed me and I felt it was something worth sharing. Actually I was incredibly surprised that I enjoyed Obs/Gynae. Women's health was a placement I was dreading, it was my last major knowledge gap and I didn't have a clue what it was going to be like. If my tutor for the block does read this, thank you for all your help and getting me involved in everything. I would encourage other students who are going into it and feeling any level of apprehension to just throw yourselves into it and give 110% effort. It is a great placement for practicing transferable skills (this is important to remember, especially if you don't have any desire to go into it you CAN transfer and practice skills from elsewhere!) and getting heavily involved in patient care. Also I'd like to point out the Mother and Baby were fine :)  
Conrad Hayes
almost 4 years ago