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#81
Www.bmj
1
6

Gallstones

Surgery is the only definitive treatment and is recommended for people with symptomatic gallstones who are fit to undergo surgery  
www.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
#82
#83
Preview
1
24

Internal medicine tutorial, case study 2

illustrative material postgraduate medicine  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
#84
American graffiti ricky barnard
11
938

Being Black in America is Bad for Your Health

Being Black in America is dangerous. We hear about the deaths by police shooting or white supremacist - and by gun violence generally, which disproportionately plagues Black communities. But we hardly ever discuss the persistent discrepancy in life expectancy between white and black. There are many ways to attack the latter through healthcare policy and practice -- if we are willing. That remains the question for America 48 years after King was killed.  
Andrew Tarsy
over 1 year ago
#85
Fees funding
10
1117

The Medical Education Fraud

Does spending more time on the wards as medical students actually produce more competent junior doctors?  
jacob matthews
about 1 year ago
#86
Preview
1
36

April 2015 DAS intubation guidelines draft for comment

Kudos to the work of the Difficult Airway Society in UK. They are updating their intubation guidelines and have released an  April 2015 draft for open comment/feedback. Check it out and help them produce a worthy publication for us all! Find it HERE My thoughts on the April Draft : cricoid pressure to be removed…  
prehospitalmed.com
over 2 years ago
#87
Preview
3
234

Introduction to the Cranial Nerves -- Head and Neck Anatomy 101

This is the first in a series of videos broadly detailing the location and function of the 12 cranial nerves. More detailed blurb below! If you'd like to con...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
#88
Preview
1
53

ANATOMY; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; PART 1; Upper Tract; Nose, Pharynx & Larynx; by Professor Fink

This is Part 1 of 2 Anatomy Video Lectures on the Respiratory System by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes the Functions of the ...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
#89
Preview
7
182

Pathogens Song

Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. These are pathogens, can be in humans All of these germs they can harm you Ba...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
#90
Preview
4
54

History Taking (3 of 3) - Clinical Skills 101

We've had a great response to our first set of videos, so we're thrilled to hear some of you are finding them helpful! Since then we've had a few requests to...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
#91
Preview
1
18

SURGERY - Urology Part 01

The online lecture series for medical students. On demand streaming video lectures. www.mdcrack.tv Owner: MD CRACK  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
#92
Preview
3
88

OSCE Clinical Skills -Pregnant abdomen

Sample from 'Ace the OSCE' a Prize Winning OSCE Video Library. 100% Pass rate by subscribers last year and 100%Money Back Guarantee you pass your OSCEs! Real Patients with Real Signs (& standardised patients too). Includes a Handbook with detailed notes on each video. Winner of 1st Prize at the British Medical Association 2009 Book Awards: Electronic Media category. Subscribe Now at www.AceMedicine.com  
OSCE Videos
over 3 years ago
#93
4e41e369d8a8d3b69b5256b12654244e
8
328

What Does The Perfect Online Exam Revision Site Look Like?

Over 20% of UK medical students have used our exam room to revise. It's one of the most heavily utilised parts of Meducation and one of the most popular. But it's been a while since we did any work on it, something that we're about to rectify! We want to give you the opportunity to tell us how to make it even better! What's There Already? To recap where we're at currently. We have: Thousands of questions (a mixture of SBAs, MCQs and EMQs) split into over 30 categories. You can take exams of between 10 and 50 questions. You can time your exam if you're Premium You can compare your results in each question to the rest of the community and, if you're Premium, your medical school or year. You can comment on questions and vote them up or down. What Do You Want Improving? So this is your opportunity. What does a perfect online exam revision section look like? What features would you love? What annoys you? We want make the perfect section to help you practice for your exams, so please tell us what you want included. Post a comment below with your ideas on. If you agree with what someone else has said, please vote their comment up. Those that get voted up lots, we'll definitely try and implement!  
Jeremy Walker
over 4 years ago
#94
Preview
1
40

Anti-Thrombotic Therapy During Coronary Revascularization - Now@NEJM

Mr. Santana is a 67 year old man who presented to the emergency room with chest pain and was found to have ST-elevation myocardial infarction. He was taken to the cardiac catheterization lab for emergent coronary reperfusion. Which anti-thrombotic therapy should the interventional cardiologist use? What factors determine this choice?  
blogs.nejm.org
almost 2 years ago
#95
Blog
10
1350

Doctors’ Rotas: The Jokes, The Incompetence and The Illegal

Have you ever felt an organisation was treating you as another cog in a machine? Welcome to junior doctors' rotas  
jacob matthews
over 1 year ago
#96
8c2ad6bfd238cdfe976e5064511ead14
8
425

I'm Not Your Typical SHO...

I'm an SHO, but I don't have your typical ward based job. In the last four years I have treated in jungles, underwater (in scuba gear), 5m from a gorilla, up a volcano, on a beach, at altitude, on safari, in a bog and on a boat. Expedition medicine is a great way to travel the world, take time out whist expanding your CV, and be physically and mentally challenged and develop your skill and knowledge base. As a doctor, you can undertake expeditions during your 'spare time' but it is more common for doctors to go on expeditions between F2 and specialty training. This is the ideal time either because you have been working for the last 7 years and either you need a break, the NHS has broken you, or you don't know what you want to do with your career and need time to think. At this point I would recommend using your F2 course/study budget on an Expedition Medicine course. They are expensive, but the knowledge and skill base you gain makes you more prepared and competitive for expedition jobs. There are many types of Expedition Medicine jobs ranging from endurance sports races to scientific expeditions. Although the jobs differ, there are many ailments common to all. You should expect to treat diarrhoea and vomiting, insect bites, blisters, cuts, injuries, and GP complaints such headaches and exacerbations of chronic illnesses. More serious injuries and illnesses can occur so it is good to be prepared as possible. To help, ensure your medical kit is labelled and organised e.g. labelled cannulation kit, emergency kit is always accessible and you are familiar with the casevac plan. Your role as an Expedition Medic involves more that the treatment of clients. A typical job also includes client selection and education, risk assessment, updating casevac plans, stock-checking kit, health promotion, project management and writing debriefs. What's Right For You? If you're keen to do Expedition Medicine, first think about where you want to go and then for how long. Think hard about these choices. A 6 month expedition through the jungle sounds exciting, but if you don't like spiders, creepy-crawlies and leaches, and the furthest you have travelled is an all-inclusive to Mallorca, then it might be best to start with a 4 week expedition in France. When you have an idea of what you want to do there are many organisations that you can apply to, including: Operation Wallacea Raleigh Across the Divide World Challenge Floating Doctors Doctors Without Borders Royal Geographical Society Action Challenge GapForce Each organisation will have different aims, clients, resources and responsibilities so pick one that suits you. Have fun and feel free to post any question below.  
Dr Rachel Saunders
over 4 years ago
#97
Ae4de8c9821d2a4f19aeb6c21ee64d12
11
275

The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!? These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality. Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend: Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent. While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier. Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Sherwood – From cells to systems Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it. For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts. However: I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards! Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did. That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you. Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs. This is a book for any budding surgeon! Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder Macleod’s clinical examination Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf. I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice. Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder Oxford textbook of clinical pathology When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all. The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology. After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide. Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Medical Pharmacology at glance Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day. Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function. This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts! In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece! Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder. Anatomy colouring book This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all. While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery. Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it! Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!  
Benjamin Norton
over 4 years ago
#98
Healthy living sugar diabetes
8
1173

Common Not Benign - Let's Get It Under Control

Diabetes Management and Education  
Catherine Bruce
over 1 year ago
#99
Buzzword 100530476 primary.idge
4
387

One ‘Buzzword’ at a Time

The US Healthcare System Briefly Explained.  
Catherine Bruce
about 1 year ago