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#61
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Spinal Tap Procedure (Lumbar Puncture)

A spinal tap, also called lumbar puncture, is used to take a sample of the fluid from the spinal column to look for infection or bleeding.  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
#62
Preview
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Hormones

A summary of hormones  
Philip Welsby
over 8 years ago
#63
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Endocrine System Chart

Useful chart explaining glands and hormones!  
3.bp.blogspot.com
over 3 years ago
#64
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Pathophysiology of hypoxia

Based on Dr Najeeb's lecture on Hypoxia, this poster is intended to provide a brief overview of the diverse causes contributing to the pathophysiology of hypoxia. I have a Powerpoint version of this that I can email in case people are having difficulties viewing/printing the poster.  
Khalid Khan
about 4 years ago
#65
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Triangles of the Neck (Visual mnemonic)

There are various triangles of the neck, largely divided by the sternocleidomastoid muscle to form anterior and posterior triangles. Some triangles are more 'important' that others, and this simplified visual mnemonic hopes to emphasises this.  
Sunjay Parmar
over 6 years ago
#66
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Opioid Pharmacology Lecture

This presentation includes classification, cellular mechanisms and agonist and antagonists.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
#67
Foo20151013 2023 mtoqpd?1444774202
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How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
over 5 years ago
#68
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Chronic Liver Disease Powerpoint

Good starting point for chronic liver disease revision  
Sophie Stovold
over 2 years ago
#69
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Cardiovascular Examination OSCE Guide

To see the written guide alongside the video, head over to our website http://geekymedics.com/2010/09/29/cardiovascular-examination-2/ This video aims to giv...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
#70
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Clinical Skills Guide

This guide contains 30 clinical skills that are essential for every doctor in training. I created this guide when revising for my 3rd year OSCEs, confused by the amount of resources we had to revise for each one! This concise yet comprehensive guide attempts to take into account the various methods to follow for each procedure.  
o m
about 8 years ago
#71
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Antiarrhythmics

An overview of the antiarrhythmics drugs by Dr Benjamin Smeeton.  
vimeo.com
over 3 years ago
#72
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Acute back pain Presentation

An overview of clinical back pain, looking at common aetiology and methods of avoiding reinjury.  
Thomas Lemon
about 7 years ago