Personalise Your Feed

Currated by 174,000 medical professionals.
#21
Preview
7
770

Tetralogy of fallot

Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT...  
YouTube
about 4 years ago
#22
Foo20151013 2023 4u1p2i?1444774268
8
171

Like being at your own funeral - without the inconvenience of dying

I’m sure there are times when all us GPs feel under-appreciated — by our patients, staff, specialist colleagues or society in general. You can’t blame them for sometimes taking us for granted — it’s part of the human condition. People don’t value what they have until they lose it, whether “it” is the ability to walk or a domestic fairy who makes sure there’s always spare toilet paper. It’s a common lament that we can’t be at our own funerals to hear how much we’re loved. Mind you, eulogies are rarely objective and balanced. Nonetheless, it’s a pity we’re not around to hear the praise — deserved or otherwise — that is expressed once we’re gone. The long-serving, somewhat-taken-for-granted GP has a non-fatal way of bringing out the appreciation in his or her patients and staff: moving on. After 10 years of GP-ing in the Noosa hinterland and a lifetime of living in south-east Queensland, I headed south of the border: to northern NSW. The hardest part of the move for me — harder than selling my house in a depressed market, harder than dealing with banks, builders, real estate agents, solicitors and Australia Post, harder even than trying to get rational answers out of my telecommunications company after they cut off my internet and phone prematurely — was telling my patients that I was leaving. I knew many of my patients were very attached. I knew they’d come to me expecting to receive a loyal, life-long partner kind of doctoring, rather than the one-night-stand variety. But I had no idea how difficult it would be to break the “I’m leaving you” news again and again and again. Hard as breaking up a relationship may be, at least you only have to do it once when you leave a romantic partnership. For me, telling patients I was leaving felt a bit like breaking up with hundreds of boyfriends, one after the other after the other. You may interpret this as my being too close to my patients or not close enough to my boyfriends, but the fact is I found the protracted process exhausting, emotionally draining and just plain horrible. The “it’s not you, it’s me” part goes without saying and I know I am far from irreplaceable, but seeing the tears well up in countless eyes because of the words I’ve uttered was enough to break my tender heart. Looking on the bright side, as I am wont to do, if I’d ever felt under-appreciated, I sure don’t now. I received more expressions of gratitude in those last three months than I did in the previous decade. To hear how influential I was in some of my patients’ lives put a warm glow in my battered heart. And as much as it hurt me to see my patients upset, it probably would’ve hurt me more if they’d been completely indifferent to my leaving. However, I did please someone. Mrs L had been trying for years to get her husband to agree to move interstate to be near family. His last remaining excuse was that his multiple complex medical problems meant that he couldn’t possibly leave me, his long-term GP. A grateful Mrs L rang me within hours of my informing them of my impending departure to say: “He’s finally come around. Thank you so much for deciding to leave us.” It’s nice to be appreciated! (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor www.australiandoctor.com.au/opinions/the-last-word/the-last-word-on-moving-on- ) Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
about 5 years ago
#23
Preview
8
392

An Introduction to Pediatric Emergencies

A clear and consise overview of pediatric emergencies.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
#24
Preview
2
60

Macleod's Gastrointestinal Examination

Sample of DVD content available with Macleod's Clinical Examination 12th edition. A further 24 DVD quality clinical examinations available with the textbook and on student consult. The 13th edition has just been released and it's content found at http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGESeMFkgqnxC3Yvkgq7_sdfUszaRvlpr  
OSCE Videos
about 5 years ago
#25
Preview
4
227

Renal Anatomy 2 - Nephron

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This is the second tutorial in the Renal Anatomy series. This video explores the anatomy of the Nephron, and its component elements. For more entirely FREE tutorials and their accompanying PDFs, visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com  
HelpHippo.com
about 5 years ago
#26
43f9528346d5dd369871d16853ba0ca049bada659021028025794674
2
49

Footbook - OSCE preparation ressource

Aimed at final year students undergoing their OSCEs. Covers the main OSCE stations examined in a clear and concise way. Great little ressource. Highly recommended to all final year students  
Edward Karam
about 4 years ago
#27
Preview
8
392

Tension pneumothorax explained in 1 min

We discuss the causes and presentations of pneumothorax in the Emergency Department.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
#28
Preview
22
591

Mnemonics For Finals

Mnemonics are a great tool for the medical student. They allow complex information to be condensed into a few words and essentially make your memory more efficient. This material is provided by revise4finals (www.revise4finals.co.uk), courtesy of PasTest Online Revision for Medical Students (www.pastest.co.uk). You can find more mnemonics and other revision materials at both of these websites.  
revise4finals.co.uk
almost 4 years ago
#29
Preview
2
604

FRCS Urology Revision Notes (courtesy of Tom Walton)

Feel free to use my revision notes and audio files as you see fit. They were compiled over a period of two years, leading up to a successful attempt at the  
surg-online.net
almost 4 years ago
#30
Preview
0
251

Glomerulonephritis - Renal Medicine | Fastbleep

Fastbleep offers the opportunity to support a growing social network of healthcare students and educators as they consider patient care, undertake professional development and share knowledge.  
fastbleep.com
about 4 years ago
#31
Preview
3
146

Shoulder Examination

This is a nice video for explaining the shoulder examination and referencing potential findings to common injuries or complaints. It follows the typical look, feel move, special test structure.  
craig Sheridan
about 9 years ago
#32
Preview
1
21

Shoulder Ligaments

Dr. Fabian pointing out the shoulder ligaments  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
#33
Preview
1
28

Shoulder Internal Rotation

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com - In this video, the motion of shoulder or glenohumeral joint is internal rotation. Internal rotation is demonstrated starting...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
#34
Preview
87
2752

A Student's Guide to ECG Interpretation

This guide aims to provide a systematic way with which to interpret and present ECGs. Core topics in the medical school curriculum are covered.  
Richard McKearney
almost 8 years ago
#35
Dcae2aaa0ce6dd87b0aeefbe0d880e42d53823d97639712132697656
3
392

Classification of Giant Cell lesions

Useful for PG students, especially those doing oral pathology  
Subramanyam
almost 4 years ago
#36
Preview
1
36

Education special: Peripheral nerve disease update

Stream Education special: Peripheral nerve disease update by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 4 years ago
#37
Preview
5
475

How does MRI work?

A basic description of how does the MRI work, no quantum physics, no rocket science. this is for anybody  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago