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Abuse, Misuse of Antidiarrheal Linked to Serious Heart Problems

Abuse and misuse of the commonly available antidiarrheal medication loperamide has been linked to life-threatening cardiac events, according to a warning issued by the US Food and Drug Administration.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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Novel Antibody Shows Efficacy in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Early data show promising activity in small-cell lung cancer with a new antibody-drug conjugate that targets delta-like protein DLL3.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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Cigarette-Pack Warnings Work Better With Photos

Gruesome pictures on cigarette packages may convince more smokers to quit, a U.S. study suggests.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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Cuts in health prevention budgets will hit the NHS, says NHS England chief

The NHS in England can expect to feel the effects of cuts by local authorities to key public health and prevention services, NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens has told MPs.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Seven days in medicine: 1-7 June 2016

New guidance from NHS England and the Royal College of General Practitioners is urging GPs to review prescriptions for patients with learning disabilities or autism and to make sure that psychotropic drugs are continued only when the person poses a severe risk to themselves or others and all other alternatives have been exhausted. A review published last year found that between 30 000 and 35 000 people in the United Kingdom with learning disabilities or autism were taking an antidepressant or an antipsychotic despite not having the conditions for which the drugs are indicated. (See full BMJ story doi:10.1136/bmj.i3137)  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Behind the Smile

Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days. Sign up for a free trial  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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GP who was struck off for lying to police is allowed back on medical register

A South Yorkshire GP who was struck off in November 2009 for lying to police and to a coroner’s inquest has been allowed back on the medical register after a fitness to practise tribunal found that he had made exceptional efforts at remediation.1  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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TV comedian writes off $15m in US medical debt

In a television show highlighting the practices of the US debt buying industry, the comedian John Oliver wrote off nearly $15m (£10.3m; €13.2m) in medical debt owed by nearly 9000 people.1  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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MPs question whether adults with personal care budgets get best care

Some people in England with personal budgets for social care may not be getting genuinely personalised care, MPs on the Public Accounts Committee have warned.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Female doctors in US earn much less than male doctors, study finds

Female doctors in the United States earn significantly less than their male counterparts, even after adjustment for specialty, experience, and hours worked, research published in The BMJ has found.1 The researchers also found that white male doctors earned more than their black male colleagues.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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New blood test could personalise depression treatment

Scientists have developed a blood test to predict whether depressed patients will respond to common antidepressants. They said that this could herald a new area of personalised treatment for people with depression, where patients who have blood inflammation above a certain threshold could receive more aggressive treatment.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Cardiovascular screening to reduce the burden from cardiovascular disease: microsimulation study to quantify policy options

Objectives To estimate the potential impact of universal screening for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (National Health Service Health Checks) on disease burden and socioeconomic inequalities in health in England, and to compare universal screening with alternative feasible strategies.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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X-rays Questioned for Asthma Exacerbation Without Fever, Hypoxia

Radiography should not be used routinely to detect pneumonia in young children with asthma who do not have fever or hypoxia, according to new research.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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Investing? How to Choose the Right Mutual Funds

A key way to make physicians' hard-earned money grow is to invest in mutual funds. Here's how to select the best funds for you.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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Don't Recycle Bad EHR Measures Into MACRA, AMA Tells Feds

The AMA and other medical societies say that if CMS wants to get EHR interoperability right, it needs to move beyond what its meaningful use program requires.  
medscape.com
about 1 year ago
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What to do about antimicrobial resistance

Before global activities to eradicate smallpox were intensified in 1967 an estimated two million people were dying each year of the infection, with blindness affecting up to 30% of survivors. A thermostable vaccine made eradication possible and stopped sickness and death from smallpox. By eradicating smallpox, the vaccine has also avoided the need for antibiotics to treat associated secondary bacterial infections and removed the potential of resistance developing to any antiviral drugs that might have been developed. Promoting and developing vaccines is therefore rightly among the 10 main recommendations for tackling drug resistant infections that are outlined in the final report of the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance chaired by Jim O'Neill.1  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Cuts in health prevention budgets will hit the NHS, says NHS England chief

The NHS in England can expect to feel the effects of cuts by local authorities to key public health and prevention services, NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens has told MPs.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Indian scheme to reduce antibiotic misuse is failing because of widespread ignorance, say pharmacists

A scheme implemented by the Indian government in March 2014 to prevent antibiotic misuse is being hampered by low levels of patient education and poverty, clinicians have said.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 1 year ago
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Portsmouth A&E rated 'inadequate' over emergency failures - BBC News

Health inspectors rate a hospital's A&E "inadequate" because of its "chaotic" emergency department.  
bbc.co.uk
about 1 year ago
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Study says a major blood cancer is 11 distinct diseases - BBC News

One of the main types of blood cancer is not one but 11 distinct diseases, detailed genetic analysis suggests.  
bbc.co.uk
about 1 year ago