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Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System

This tutorial explores the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System, its role in Blood Pressure, the enzymes involved, and how drugs act upon the system.  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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Fundoscopy OSCE

An OSCE presentation by Sarah Lawrence and Oscar Swift of UCLU MedSoc aimed at clinical medical students. It will briefly go through how to perform a fundoscopy station in 5 minutes and the features of the basic pathologies (including diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy, retinal artery/vein occlusion and others) you might see.  
Sarah Lawrence
almost 5 years ago
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Learn about Systolic Murmurs, Diastolic Murmurs, and Extra Heart Sounds

Watch this excellent tutorial by Khan Academy to get to grips with heart sounds.  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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A medical student guide to Red Eye

This booklet was developed as a part of Special Study Unit (Doctors as Teachers) at Peninsula Medical School. This booklet covers some of the important aspects of Ophthalmology. This booklet could be used as a quick revision guide before finals and also could be used along Ophthalmology placements. The purpose of this booklet is to provide some insight into the most common presentations of red eye and their management.  
Nirosa Vicneswararajah
almost 5 years ago
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Microbiology - bacteria, fungi, yeasts and viruses

I made this Powerpoint presentation a while ago to help me learn/revise this topic.  
Sarah Watson
over 5 years ago
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OSCE Gastrointestinal examination

Thorough flowchart for carrying out a full examination of the gastrointestinal system - should come in very handy for OSCEs!  
Julia Marr
about 3 years ago
Stat 12 lead 5 2
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EKG-CHEAT SHEET

 
statmedicaleducation.com
about 2 years ago
Endocrinesystemchart+(1)
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Endocrine System Chart

Useful chart explaining glands and hormones!  
3.bp.blogspot.com
over 1 year ago
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Haematological Malignancies Slideshow

Get a brief overview of the haematological system - covering Leukaemias, Lymphomas, Myelomas and other paraproteinaemias.  
Oscar Swift
almost 5 years ago
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Psychiatry Drugs Slideshow

A PowerPoint presentation created for revision purposes of psychiatry meds.  
alicia tomkinson
about 6 years ago
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Gastroenterology Tutorial

Slideshow covering the some of the key conditions in gastroenterology.  
James Davis
almost 5 years ago
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Nerves of the Upper Limb Table

Useful table for med students covering route, origin, course and branches and injury.  
slideshare.net
over 1 year ago
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A Student's Guide to ECG Interpretation

This guide aims to provide a systematic way with which to interpret and present ECGs. Core topics in the medical school curriculum are covered.  
Richard McKearney
about 6 years ago
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The Clotting Cascade Diagram

An image of both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of the clotting cascade including the interactions between the two and other finer details.  
Leah Flanagan
about 1 year ago
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Roughly 50 Medical Mnemonics

Mohammed Khaledur Rahman| Student at King’s College London GKT Medical School 26th March - 09th June ROUGHLY 50 MEDICAL MNEMONICS  
Mohammed Rahman
over 4 years ago
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Endocrine Principles

Endocrine Revision  
Stephen McAleer
about 4 years ago
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Headaches at a Glance - Usman Ahmed

Teaching resource designed for Peninsula Medical School Students, who sit an exam called the AMK. This exam is an MCQ based exam and covers a number of clinical scenarios. This booklet specifically looks at the common causes of headaches.  
Usman Ahmed
about 6 years ago
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How to Study

Because of the snail's pace that education has developed at, most of us don't really know how to study because we've been told lectures and reading thousands of pages is the best way to go, and no one really wants to do that all day. That's not the only way to study. My first year of medical school... You know when you start the year so committed, then eventually you skip lectures once or twice... then you just binge on skipping? Kinda like breaking a diet "Two weeks in: oh I'll just have a bite of your mac n' cheese... oh is that cake? and doritos? and french fries? Give me all of it all at once." Anyways, when that happened in first year I started panicking after a while; but after studying with friends who had attended lectures, I found they were almost as clueless as I was. I'm not trying to say lectures are useless... What my fellow first years and I just didn't know was how to use the resources we had– whether we were keen beans or lazy pants, or somewhere in between. I still struggle with study habits, but I've formed some theories since and I'm going to share these with you. Reading While reading should not be the entire basis of your studying, it is the best place to start. Best to start with the most basic and detailed sources (ex.Tortora if it's a topic I'm new to, then Kumar and Clark, and Davidson's are where I usually start, but there are tons of good ones out there!). I do not feel the need to read every section of a chapter, it's up to the reader's discretion to decide what to read based on objectives. If you do not have time for detailed reading, there are some wonderful simplified books that will give you enough to get through exams (ICT and crash course do some great ones!). I start with this if exams are a month or less away. Later, it's good to go through books that provide a summarized overview of things, to make sure you've covered all bases (ex. Flesh and Bones, the 'Rapid ______" series, oxford clinical handbook, etc.). These are also good if you have one very specific question about a subject. Video Tutorials**** After all that reading, you want the most laid back studying you can find. This is where Meducation and Youtube become your best friend. (I can post a list of my favourite channels if anyone is interested).I always email these people to thank them. I know from the nice people that run this website that it takes a tremendous amount of effort and a lot of the time and it's just us struggling students who have much to gain. Everyone should use video tutorials. It doesn't matter if you're all Hermione with your books; every single person can benefit from them, especially for osce where no book can fully portray what you're supposed to do/see/hear during examinations. Some youtube channels I like https://www.youtube.com/user/TheAnatomyZone https://www.youtube.com/user/ECGZone https://www.youtube.com/user/MEDCRAMvideos https://www.youtube.com/user/awolfnp https://www.youtube.com/user/harpinmartin https://www.youtube.com/user/RadiologyChannel Lectures We're all thinking it, lectures can be boring. Especially when the speaker has text vomited all over their slides (seriously, If I can't read it from the back of the lecture hall, there's too much!. It's even worse when they're just reading everything to you, and you're frantically trying to write everything down. Here's the thing, you're not supposed to write everything down. If you can print the slides beforehand or access them on your laptop/ipad/whatever you use and follow along, do that. You're meant to listen, nod along thinking (oh yes I remember this or oooh that's what happens? or Oh I never came across that particular fact, interesting!). It's also meant to be a chance for you to discuss interesting cases from the a doctor's experiences. If you're lucky to have really interactive lecturers, interact! Don't be shy! Even if you make a fool of yourself, you're more likely to remember what you learned better. If you happen to be in a lecture you're completely unprepared for (basically 70% of the time?). Think of it as "throwing everything at a wall and hoping something sticks." Pull up the slides on your smart phone if you have one, only take notes on interesting or useful things you hear the speaker say. If all else fails, these lectures where tell you what topics to go home and read about. Tutorials My university has gradually increased its use of tutorials, and I couldn't be happier. Make the most out of these because they are a gift. Having the focused attention of a knowledgeable doctor or professor in a small group for a prolonged period of time is hard to lock down during hospital hours. Ask lots of questions, raise topics you're having trouble understanding, this is your protected time. Discussions In group study activities, this is particularly hard to make the most of when everyone in your group varies in studying progression, but even so, it can be beneficial. Other people's strengths might be your weaknesses and vise versa– and it's always helpful to hear an explanation about something from someone at your level, because they will neither under or over estimate you, and they will not get offended when you tell them "ok I get it that's enough." Myself and 3 of my medic friends would meet once a week the month or two leading up to exams at one of our houses to go through OSCE stations and concepts we didn't understand (food helps too). Besides peer discussions, you should take advantage of discussions with doctors. If the doctor is willing to give you their time, use it well. Practice Questions I am a practice question book hoarder. Practice questions book not only test and reaffirm your knowledge, which is often hard to find if your exams are cumulative and you have little to no quizes/tests. They also have concise, useful explanations at the back and, they tell you where the gaps in your studying are. For my neuro rotation, the doctor giving the first and last lecture gave us a quiz, it was perfect for monitoring our progress, and the same technique can be used in your studies. Practical Clinical Experiences If you freeze up during exams and blank out, and suddenly the only forms of text floating around your brain are Taylor Swift lyrics, these are bound to come to your rescue! "Learn by doing." Take as many histories as you can, do as many clinical exams in hospital, and on your friends to practice, as you can, see and DO as many clinical procedures as you can; these are all easy and usually enjoyable forms of studying. Teaching Have you ever had an experience where one of your peers asks you about something and you give them a fairly good explanation then you think to yourself "Oh wow, I had no idea that was actually in there. High five me." If there is ever an opportunity to teach students in the years below you or fellow students in your year, do it! It will force you to form a simplified/accurate explanation; and once you've taught others, it is sure to stick in your head. Even if it's something you don't really know about, committing yourself to teaching others something forces you to find all the necessary information. Sometimes if there's a bunch of topics that nobody in my study group wants to do, we each choose one, go home and research it, and explain it to each other to save time. If you're doing this for a presentation, make handouts, diagrams or anything else that can be used as an aid.  
Mary
over 3 years ago
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Memorise 3 members of the Enterobacteriaceae family

The best Microbiology video yet!  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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Wilson's Disease: Definition, Symptoms & Pathophysiology

Excellent video covering the pathophysiology of Wilson's disease, as well as common signs and symptoms, complications, and treatments.  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago