New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

CPD Tracker

00:00

Foo20151013 2023 vzuuwz?1444774280

Beating the Bully

Written by Lucas Brammar · Monday 24th September 2018

I read an article recently that 90% of surgical trainees have experienced bullying of one form or other in their practice. That’s 90%. That’s shocking. Worryingly it is highly likely that this statistic is not purely isolated to surgery. This is evidence of a major problem that needs to be addressed. We don’t accept bullying in schools and in the workplace policies are in place to stop bullying and harassment– so why have 90% of trainees experienced bullying? I can relate to this from personal experience, as I am sure most of us can.

Prior to intercalating I had always had the typical med student ambition of joining the big league and taking on surgery. I had a keen interest in anatomy, I had decided to intercalate in anatomy, I did an SSC on surgical robotics, presented at an undergraduate surgical conference and had a small exposure to surgery in my first couple of years that gave me enough drive to take on a competitive career path. I took it upon myself to try and arrange a brief summer attachment where I would learn as a clinical medical student what it is like to scrub in and be in theatre. At the beginning I was so excited. At the end every time someone mentioned surgery I felt sick.

It became apparent very quickly that I was an inconvenience. I think medical students all get this feeling – ‘being in the way’ - but this was different. This was being made to feel deliberately uncomfortable. I asked if I could have some guidance on scrubbing in and this was met with a complete huff and annoyance because I didn’t know how to do it properly (thank goodness for a lovely team of theatre nurses!). I even got assigned a pet name for the week – the ‘limpet’ (notable for their clinging on to rocks) that was frequently used as a humiliation tactic in front of colleagues. By the end of the week I dreaded walking into the hospital and felt physically sick every morning. Now some people might say ‘man up’ and get on with it. Fair enough, but I’m a fairly resilient character and it takes a lot to make me feel like I did that week. This experience completely eradicated any ambition I had at the time to go into surgery. Since then I’ve focused elsewhere and generally dreaded surgical rotations until very recently where I managed to meet a wonderful orthopaedic team who were incredibly encouraging.

Bullying can be subjective. Just because a consultant asks you a difficult question doesn’t mean they’re bullying you. By and large clinicians want to stretch you and trigger buttons that make you go and look things up. If it drives you to work and develops you as a professional then it’s not bullying, but if it makes you feel rubbish, sick or less about yourself then you should perhaps think twice about the way you’re being treated.

Of course bullying doesn’t stop at professionals. Psychological bullying is rife in medical schools. We’ve all been ‘psyched out’ by our peers – how much do you know? How did you know that when I didn’t? Intimidating behaviour can be just as aggressive. Americans dub these people ‘Gunners’ although we’ve been rather nice and adopted the word ‘keen’ instead.

Luckily most medical schools have a port of call for this sort of behaviour. But a word of advice – don’t let anyone shrug it off. If it’s a problem, if it’s affecting you – tell someone. Bullying individuals that are trying to learn and develop as professionals is entirely unacceptable.

If you would like to share similar experiences, drop them in the comments box below.

Responses

A. Banterings
·
Posted about 4 years ago
Unfortunately this becomes a learned behavior and as physician gains seniority they will bully less experienced physicians too. It does not stop there, patients are routinely bullied. (Pelvic exams for birth control...) The wake up call for a fri
Like
(0)
Respond
Kathleen Minichiello
·
Posted almost 4 years ago
I am a clinical pharmacist and was bullied relentlessly by my physician manager for 12 months in an organization part of a major teaching hospital in the Northeast. I filed a complaint with human resources and they turned a blind eye. I was then given a
Like
(0)
Respond
Anonymous
·
Posted about 3 years ago
I am an acute care trainee, and experienced bullying and harassment for over nine months in an ICU/Anaesthetic post. This constituted undermining, delayed and indirect feedback that was different from that given to me face to face in theatre, aggressive b
Like
(0)
Respond
Asra Alwandi
·
Medical Student - St. Georges University, London
·
Posted about 3 years ago
I'm so sorry to hear that. I guess wherever you go, senior people will always pick on the more junior staff- unfortunately it's inevitable. Like you stated, even medical students can bully you, e.g. about how much you know, what you get in exams etc. I de
Like
(0)
Respond