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"I Wonder Why?" How Curiosity Can Cure Disease

A talk by Rachel I. Wilson, AB '96, PhD, professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. Moderated by Freda C. Lewis-Hall, MD, DFAPA, executive vice president and chief medical officer of Pfizer and a member of the HMS Board of Fellows. Harvard Medical School MED-EDs are a series of short, thought-provoking presentations by renowned HMS faculty, alumni, and leadership volunteers built to share and inspire new ideas.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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Are Placebo Effects Worth Anything?

A talk by Ted J. Kaptchuck, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director for the Program in Placebo Studies (PiPS) at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Moderated by Freda C. Lewis-Hall, MD, DFAPA, executive vice president and chief medical officer of Pfizer and a member of the HMS Board of Fellows. Harvard Medical School MED-EDs are a series of short, thought-provoking presentations by renowned HMS faculty, alumni, and leadership volunteers built to share and inspire new ideas.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 4 years ago
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The man with 42 hours to get home - BBC News

When Peter Hodes travels abroad he always makes sure to get home within 42 hours. The reason? He's a volunteer courier carrying life-saving stem cells.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
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BBC reporter is first volunteer scanned for Biobank - BBC News

BBC health correspondent Fergus Walsh was the first of 100,000 volunteers to be scanned for the world's biggest body scanning project.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
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Hi-tech headset to guide blind people - BBC News

Rory Cellan-Jones meets volunteers in Reading trialling a headset that talks visually impaired people around cities.  
BBC News
almost 4 years ago
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Battling Ebola in Sierra Leone was 'life changing' - BBC News

The BBC's Laura Bicker spent the day with a Scottish GP who has returned to the UK after joining volunteers battling Ebola in Sierra Leone.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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Genetic project calls for 100 000 volunteers from Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London

One of the world’s biggest community genetics studies has been launched with a call for 100 000 volunteers from the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London. Genetic data will be linked with health records held by local general practices with the aim of understanding better the links between genes and health in these close-knit communities.  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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Genetic project calls for 100 000 volunteers from Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London

One of the world’s biggest community genetics studies has been launched with a call for 100 000 volunteers from the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London. Genetic data will be linked with health records held by local general practices with the aim of understanding better the links between genes and health in these close-knit communities.  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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Genetic project calls for 100 000 volunteers from Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London

One of the world’s biggest community genetics studies has been launched with a call for 100 000 volunteers from the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London. Genetic data will be linked with health records held by local general practices with the aim of understanding better the links between genes and health in these close-knit communities.  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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The future is now

Featuring the voices of patients, volunteers, clinicians and managers, our new digital report explores future ways of changing health and health care for the better. Today’s debates over health service pressures must not prevent us from addressing tomorrow’s need for radical change in our care systems. In this new digital report, The King’s Fund embarks on a journey across England and overseas into future ways of changing health and health care for the better.  
The King's Fund
over 3 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1f9109k?1444774063
2
1852

Criticizing the NHS - Can students do this productively?

In this month’s SBMJ (May 2013) a GP called Dr Michael Ingram has written a very good article highlighting some of the problems with the modern NHS’s administrative systems, especially relating to the huge amount of GP time wasted on following up after administrative errors and failings. I personally think that it is important for people working within the NHS to write articles like this because without them then many of us would be unaware of these problems or would feel less confident in voicing our own similar thoughts. The NHS is a fantastic idea and does provide an excellent service compared to many other health care systems around the world, but there is always room for improvement – especially on the administrative side! The issues raised by Dr Ingram were: Histology specimens being analysed but reports not being sent to the GP on time or with the correct information. Histology reports not being discussed with patient’s directly when they try and contact the hospital to find out the results and instead being referred to their GP, who experiences the problem stated above. GP’s are being left to deal with patient’s problems that have nothing to do with the GP and their job and have everything to do with an inefficient NHS bureaucracy. These problems and complaints often taking up to a third of a GP’s working day and thereby reducing the time they can spend actually treating patients. Having to arrange new outpatient appointments for patients when their appointment letters went missing or when appointments were never made etc. Even getting outpatient appointments in the first place and how these are often delayed well after the recommended 6 week wait. Patients who attend outpatient appointments often have to consult their GP to get a prescription that the hospital consultant has recommended, so that the GP bares the cost and not the hospital. My only issue with this article is that Dr Ingram highlights a number of problems with the NHS systems but then does not offer a single solution/idea on how these systems could be improved. When medical students are taught to write articles for publication it is drummed into us that we should always finish the discussion section with a conclusion and recommendations for further work/ implications for practice. I was just thinking that if doctors, medical students, nurses and NHS staff want to complain about the NHS’s failings then at least suggest some ways of improving these problems at the same time. This then turns what is essentially a complaint/rant into helpful, potentially productive criticism. If you (the staff) have noticed that these problems exist then you have also probably given some thought to why the problem exists, so why not just say/write how you think the issue could be resolved? If your grievances and solutions are documented and available then someone in the NHS administration might take your idea up and actually put it into practice, potentially reducing the problem (a disgustingly idealist thought I know). A number of times I have been told during medical school lectures and at key note speeches at conferences that medical students are a valuable resource to the NHS administration because we visit different hospitals, we wander around the whole hospital, we get exposed to the good and bad practice and we do not have any particular loyalty to any one department and can therefore objective observations. So, I was thinking it might be interesting to ask as many medical students as possible for their thoughts on how to improve the systems within the NHS. So I implore any of you reading this blog: write your own blog about short comings that you have noticed, make a recommendation for how to improve it and then maybe leave a link in the comments below this blog. If we start taking more of an interest in the NHS around us and start documenting where improvements could be made then maybe we could together work to create a more efficient and effective NHS. So I briefly just sat down and had a think earlier today about a few potential solutions for the problems highlighted in Dr Ingram’s article. A community pathology team that handles all of the GP’s pathology specimens and referrals. A “patient pathway co-ordinator” could be employed as additional administrative staff by GP surgeries to chase up all of the appointments and missing information that is currently using up a lot of the GP’s time and thereby freeing them to see more patients. I am sure this role is already carried out by admin staff in GP practices but perhaps in an ad hoc way, rather than that being their entire job. Do the majority of GP practices get access to the hospitals computer systems? Surely, if GPs had access to the hospital systems this would mean a greater efficiency for booking outpatient appointments and for allowing GPs to follow up test results etc. In the few outpatient departments I have come across outpatient appointments are often made by the administration team and then sent by letter to the patients, with the patient not being given a choice of when is good for them. Would it not be more efficient for the administrative staff to send the patients a number of appointment options for the patient to select one appropriate for them? Eliyahu M. Goldratt was a business consultant who revolutionized manufacturing efficiency a few years ago. He wrote a number of books on his theories that are very interesting and easy to read because he tries to explain most of his points using a narrative – “The Goal” and “Critical Chain” being just tow. His business theories focussed on finding the bottle neck in an industrial process, because if that is the rate limiting step in the manufacturing process then it is the most essential part for improving efficiency of the whole process. Currently, most GPs refer patients to outpatient appointments at hospitals and this can often take weeks or months. The outpatient appointments are a bottle neck in the process of getting patients the care they require. Therefore, focussing attention on how outpatient appointments are co-ordinated and run would improve the efficiency in the “patient pathway” as a whole. a. Run more outpatient clinics. b. Pay consultants overtime to do more clinics, potentially in the evenings or at weekends. While a lot may not want to do this, a few may volunteer and help to reduce the back log on the waiting lists. c. Have more patients seen by nurse specialists so that more time is freed up for the consultants to see the more urgent or serious patients. d. An obvious, yet expensive solution, hire more consultants to help with the ever increasing workload. e. Change the outpatient system so that it becomes more of an assembly line system with one doctor and a team of nurses handling the “new patient” appointments and another team handling the “old patient” follow up appointments rather than having them all mixed together at the same time. I am sure that there are many criticisms of the points I have written above and I would be interested to hear them. I would also love to hear any other solutions for the problems mentioned above. Final thought for today … Why shouldn’t medical students make criticisms of inefficiencies and point them out to the relevant administrator? If anyone else is interested in how the NHS as a whole is run then there is a new organisation called the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management that is keen to recruit interested student members (www.fmlm.ac.uk).  
jacob matthews
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 37skir?1444774198
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Biohacking - The Brighter Side of Health

2014 is already more than a month old (if you can believe it) and with each passing day, the world we live in is speeding towards breakthroughs in every sphere of life. We're running full tilt, wanting to be bigger and better than we were the day or the hour before. Every passing day reinvents the 'cutting edge' of technology, including medical progress and advancement. Gone are the medieval days when doctors were considered all knowing deities, while medicine consisted of leeches being used to drain 'bad blood'. Nowadays, health isn't just about waiting around until you pick up an infection, then going to your local GP to get treated; in today's world it's all about sustaining your wellbeing. And for that, the new kid on the block is biohacking. Biohacking is the art and science of maximizing your biological potential. As a hacker aims to gain complete control of the system he's trying to infiltrate, be it social or technological; similarly a biohacker aims to obtain full control of his own biology. Simply put, a biohacker looks for techniques to improve himself and his way of life. Before you let your imagination run away with you and start thinking of genetic experiments gone wrong, let me assure you that a biohack is really just about any activity you can do to increase your capabilities or advance your wellbeing. Exercising daily can be a biohack. So can doing the crossword or solving math sums, if it raises your IQ by a few points or improves your general knowledge. What characterizes biohacking is the end goal and the consequent modification of activities to achieve that goal. So what kind of goals would a biohacker have? World domination? Not quite. Adding more productive hours to the day and more productivity to those hours? Check. Eliminating stress and it's causes from their lives? Check. Improving mood, memory and recall, and general happiness? You bet. So the question arises; aren't we all biohackers of sorts? After all, the above mentioned objectives are what everyone aspires to achieve in their lives at one point or the other. unfortunately for all the lazy people out there (including yours truly), biohacking involves being just a tad bit more pro active than just scribbling down a list of such goals as New Year resolutions! There are two main approaches to selecting a biohack that works for you- the biggest aim and the biggest gain. The biggest aim would be targeting those capabilities, an improvement in which would greatly benefit you. This could be as specific as improving your public speaking skills or as general as working upon your diet so you feel more fit and alert. In today's competitive, cut throat world, even the slightest edge can ensure that you reach the finish line first. The biggest gain would be to choose a technique that is low cost- in other words, one that is beneficial yet doesn't burn a hole through your pocket! It isn't possible to give a detailed description of all the methods pioneering biohackers have initiated, but here are some general areas that you can try to upgrade in your life: Hack your diet- They say you are what you eat. Your energy levels are related to what you eat, when you take your meals, the quantity you consume etc. your mood and mental wellbeing is greatly affected by your diet. I could go on and on, but this point is self expanatory. You need to hack your diet! Eat healthier and live longer. Hack your brain- Our minds are capable of incredible things when they're trained to function productively. Had this not been the case, you and I would still be sitting in our respective caves, shivering and waiting for someone to think long enough to discover fire. You don't have to be a neuroscientist to improve your mental performance-studies show that simply knowing you have the power to improve your intelligence is the first step to doing it. Hack your abilities- Your mindset often determines your capacity to rise to a challenge and your ability to achieve. For instance, if you're told that you can't achieve a certain goal because you're a woman, or because you're black or you're too fat or too short, well obviously you're bound to restrict yourself in a mental prison of your own shortcomings. But it's a brave new world so push yourself further. Try something new, be that tacking on an extra lap to your daily exercise routine or squeezing out the extra time to do some volunteer work. Your talents should keep growing right along with you. Hack your age- You might not be able to do much about those birthday candles that just keep adding up...but you can certainly hack how 'old' you feel. Instead of buying in on the notion that you decline as you grow older, look around you. Even simple things such as breathing and stamina building exercises can change the way you age. We have a responsibility to ourselves and to those around us to live our lives to the fullest. So maximise your potential, push against your boundaries, build the learning curve as you go along. After all, health isn't just the absence of disease but complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and biohacking seems to be Yellow Brick Road leading right to it!  
Huda Qadir
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 mtoqpd?1444774202
14
1104

How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
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Genetic project calls for 100 000 volunteers from Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London

One of the world’s biggest community genetics studies has been launched with a call for 100 000 volunteers from the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in east London. Genetic data will be linked with health records held by local general practices with the aim of understanding better the links between genes and health in these close-knit communities.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
0
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Experimental drug that injured UK volunteers resumes in human trials

A phase II trial of an experimental drug that made headlines nine years ago when it caused horrific injuries to volunteers in a London trial is about to begin in Russia to evaluate it as a potential treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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One year on from the Boston Marathon bombing, caregivers still grappling with tragedy

Nearly a year after the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, hospital staff, first responders and medical volunteers who cared for the injured and dying were still struggling to put the experience...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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CDC investigating potential exposures of American citizens to Ebola in West Africa

CDC continues to investigate potential Ebola exposure among individuals in Sierra Leone, including several American citizens, following the identification of an American volunteer healthcare...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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30-year-old Russian man volunteers for world's first human head transplant

Valery Spiridonov, a 30-year-old computer scientist with a rare genetic muscle wasting disease, is to become the first person to undergo the world's first human head transplant.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Médecins Sans Frontières: the organisation at the heart of the Ebola outbreak

Médecins Sans Frontières helps anyone from victims of a war to injured terrorists. Martin Fletcher joins the volunteers in Freetown, where they are treating Ebola victims  
telegraph.co.uk
over 3 years ago