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Foo20151013 2023 1eqve0g?1444774030
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LWW: Case Of The Month - May 2013

This month’s case is by Barbara J. Mroz, M.D. and Robin R. Preston, Ph.D., author of Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: .Physiology (ISBN: 9781451175677). For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/PrestonLIR, with 15% off using the discount code: MEDUCATION. The case below is followed by a choice of diagnostic tests. Select the one lettered selection that would be most helpful in diagnosing the patient’s condition. The Case A 54-year-old male 2 pack-per-day smoker presents to your office complaining of cough and shortness of breath (SOB). He reports chronic mild dyspnea on exertion with a daily cough productive of clear mucus. During the past week, his cough has increased in frequency and is now productive of frothy pink-tinged sputum; his dyspnea is worse and he is now short of breath sometimes even at rest. He has had difficulty breathing when lying flat in bed and has spent the past two nights sleeping upright in a recliner. On physical examination, he is a moderately obese male with a blood pressure of 180/80 mm Hg, pulse of 98, and respiratory rate of 22. His temperature is 98.6°F. He becomes winded from climbing onto the exam table. Auscultation of the lungs reveals bilateral wheezing and crackles in the lower posterior lung fields. There is pitting edema in the lower extremities extending up to the knees.  Question Which if the following tests would be most helpful in confirming the correct diagnosis? A. Spirometry B. Arterial blood gas C. Complete blood count D. B-type natriuretic peptide blood test E. Electrocardiogram Answer? The correct answer is B-type natriuretic peptide blood test. Uncomfortable breathing, or feeling short of breath, is a common medical complaint with multiple causes. When approaching a patient with dyspnea, it is helpful to remember that normal breathing requires both a respiratory system that facilitates gas exchange between blood and the atmosphere, and a cardiovascular system that transports O2 and CO¬2 between the lungs and tissues. Dysfunction in either system may cause dyspnea, and wheezing (or bronchospasm) may be present in both cardiac and pulmonary disease. In this patient, the presence of lower extremity edema and orthopnea (discomfort when lying flat) are both suggestive of congestive heart failure (CHF). Elevated blood pressure (systolic of 180) and a cough productive of frothy pink sputum may also be associated symptoms. While wheezing could also be caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in the setting of chronic tobacco use, the additional exam findings of lung crackles and edema plus systolic hypertension are all more consistent with CHF. What does the B-type natriuretic peptide blood test tell us? When the left ventricle (LV) fails to maintain cardiac output (CO) at levels required for adequate tissue perfusion, pathways are activated to increase renal fluid retention. A rising plasma volume increases LV preload and sustains CO via the Frank-Starling mechanism. Volume loading also stimulates cardiomyocytes to release atrial- (ANP) and B-type (BNP) natriuretic peptides. BNP has a longer half-life than ANP and provides a convenient marker for volume loading. Plasma BNP levels are measured using immunoassay; levels >100 pg/mL are suggestive of overload resulting in heart failure. How does heart failure cause dyspnea? Increasing venous pressure increases mean capillary hydrostatic pressure and promotes fluid filtration from the vasculature. Excess filtration from pulmonary capillaries causes fluid accumulation within the alveoli (pulmonary edema) and interferes with normal gas exchange, resulting in SOB. Physical signs and symptoms caused by high volume loading include: (1) Lung crackles, caused by fluid within alveoli (2) Orthopnea. Reclining increases pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure through gravitational effects, worsening dyspnea when lying flat. (3) Pitting dependent edema caused by filtration from systemic capillaries, an effect also influenced by position (causing edema in the lower legs as in our ambulatory patient or in dependent areas like the sacrum in a bedridden patient). What would an electrocardiogram show? Heart failure can result in LV hypertrophy and manifest as a left axis deviation on an electrocardiogram (ECG), but some patients in failure show a normal ECG. An ECG is not a useful diagnostic tool for dyspnea or CHF per se. Wouldn’t spirometry be more suitable for diagnosing the cause of dyspnea in a smoker? Simple spirometry will readily identify the presence of airflow limitation (obstruction) as a cause of dyspnea. It's a valuable test to perform in any smoker and can establish a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if abnormal. While this wheezing patient is an active smoker who could have airflow obstruction, the additional exam findings above point more to a diagnosis of CHF. What would an arterial blood gas show? An arterial blood gas measures arterial pH, PaCO¬2, and PaO2. While both CHF and COPD could cause derangements in the values measured, these abnormalities would not necessarily be diagnostic (e.g., a low PaO2 could be seen in both conditions, as could an elevated PaCO¬2). Would a complete blood count provide useful information? A complete blood count could prove useful if anemia is a suspected cause of dyspnea. Test result BNP was elevated (842 pg/mL), consistent with CHF. Diuretic treatment was initiated to help reduce volume overload and an afterload reducing agent was started to lower blood pressure and improve systolic function.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
almost 8 years ago
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What's the effect of taking blood pressure on both arms at once?

In hospital today, while I was taking a patient's blood pressure, another student asked if she could take her pressure on the other arm to practice. The patient didn't mind, but I thought it might be dangerous. Is this dangerous? What would happen if we pumped the cuff on both arms at the same time? Also, would this give an incorrect reading?  
Mohammed Pervez
over 8 years ago
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1621

Why does heart rate fall when you jump in cold water?

I thought your heart rate would increase when you jump in cold water because of adrenaline release, but I've been told it decreases. Why is this? Thanks!  
Katy Kershaw
about 8 years ago
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What are the 12 factors that influence blood pressure?

A professor asked "What are the 12 factors that influence blood pressure?". The number of factors that I can think of is 4 at most. Does anyone has any idea to what these 12 factors are?  
Rama Raja
about 8 years ago
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What are the influencing factors of blood pressure?

My Professor asked on the first day of my semester "What are the influencing factors of blood pressure?" I only know a few and there are more. Correct me if I am wrong but I believe: Stress Smoking Alcohol Obesity Haemorrhage Heart disease High body temperature Can someone help me please?  
Keysha Mendoza
over 7 years ago
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Radial pulse being slower than heart rate?

Is it possible to have a slower radial pulse than your actual heart rate. Someone told me it was, but I can't understand how this would be possible!!! Could someone enlighten me, as I can't understand why this would ever occur.  
Andrew Rinley
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1fhdw5v?1444774091
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The Arterial Highway

Metaphors and analogies have long been used to turn complex medical concepts into everyday ones, albeit with fancy terminology. Having been involved with many 3D animations on the topics of Blood Pressure, arteriosclerosis, cholesterol and the like, we find that often a metaphor goes a long way to building understanding, credibility and even compliance with patients. One of my favorite analogies is what we call the arterial highway. Much like their tarmacked counterparts, arteries act as conduits for all the parts that make your body go. A city typically uses highways, gas lines, water pipes, railways and other infrastructure to distribute important materials to its people. Your body is much the same, except that it does it all in one system, the cardiovascular system. This is used to deliver nutrients, extract waste, transport and deliver oxygen and even to maintain the temperature! The arteries can do all these things because of their smart three-layered structure. Our arteries consist of a muscular tube lined by smooth tissue. They have three layers named – the Adventitia, Media and Intima. Each is designed with a specific function and through the magic of evolution has developed to perform its function perfectly. The first is the Tunica Adventitia, or just adventitia. It is a strong outer covering over the arteries and veins. It has special tissues that are fibrous. The fibers let the arteries flex, expanding and contracting to accommodate changes in blood pressure as the blood flows past it. Unlike a steel pipe, arteries pulsate and so must be at once be flexible, and strong. Tunica Media - the middle layer of the walls of arteries and veins is made up of a smooth muscle with some elasticity built in. This layer expands and contracts in a rhythmic fashion, much like a Wave at a baseball game, as blood moves along it. The media layer is thicker in arteries than in veins, and importantly so, as arteries carry blood at a higher pressure than veins. The innermost layer of arteries and veins is the Tunica Intima. In arteries, this layer is composed of an elastic lining and smooth endothelium - a thin sheet of cells that form a type of skin over the surface. The elastic tissue present in the artery can stretch and return, allowing the arteries to adapt to changes in flow and blood pressure. The intima is also a very smoothe, slick layer so that blood can easily flow past it. Every layer of the artery has developed evolutionary traits that help your arterial system to maintain flexibility, strength and promote blood flow. Diseases and conditions like high cholesterol or high blood pressure, diabetes and others prevent the arteries from doing their function well by creating blockages or increasing the stress on one or more of the layers. For example, high blood pressure causes rips in the smooth lining of the Intima. Anybody who has experienced a pipe burst in a house knows that the damage can be extreme and can never fully be restored. Understanding the delicate functions of the arterial structure gives good incentive to treat them better. Conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and lifestyle diseases such as diabetes create tears, holes, blockages, and can disrupt the functions of one or more layers. Getting patients to visualize the effect of bad eating habits on their anatomy helps to increase patient compliance. In modern society, the concept of highways goes hand in hand with the concept of traffic jams. Patients understand that the arterial highway is one that can never be jammed.  
Mr. Rohit Singh
over 7 years ago
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Mortality and blood pressure directly linked to relationship quality

While other studies have shown that stress and negative marital quality can influence mortality and blood pressure, there has not been research that discussed how it might affect married couples...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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Fear of terrorism increases resting heart rate and risk of death

A new study of over 17,000 Israelis has found that long-term exposure to the threat of terrorism can elevate people's resting heart rates and increase their risk of dying.  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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Systems-wide genetic study of blood pressure regulation in the Framingham Heart Study

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure.  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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Blood pressure drug protects against symptoms of multiple sclerosis in animal models

FDA-approved drug prevents myelin loss and alleviates symptoms of MS by enhancing innate cellular protective responseAn FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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Medicaid is a very good investment even if it does not lower cholesterol or blood pressure

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the results of the Oregon Health Experiment, where eligible uninsured individuals were randomly assigned Medicaid...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago
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Patient self-reporting version of 'blood pressure cuff' for dementia is reliable and valid

The patient self-reporting version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor - a primary-care tool to measure cognitive, functional and psychological symptoms - is user-friendly, reliable and...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 6 years ago