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Www.bmj
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7

Ebola: a game changer for vaccines, or a scare that will soon be forgotten?

Scientists say that it is only a matter of time before another neglected infectious disease causes a global public health emergency. So will the world now make these diseases a priority? Sophie Arie reports  
feeds.bmj.com
about 6 years ago
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22

How to Reverse GERD and Leaky Gut

How to Reverse GERD and Leaky Gut GERD and leaky gut are caused by GMOs, antibiotics, and vaccines that blow holes in the gut. This can lead to autism, autoi...  
youtube.com
almost 6 years ago
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5

Vaccines for preventing severe salmonella infections in people with sickle cell disease | Cochrane

Salmonella organisms are probably second only to pneumococcus among bacterial causes of infection in people with sickle cell disease. Infection with these bacteria can lead to complications and reduce the quality of life of people with the disease and sometimes result in death. Immunization with salmonella vaccines is one of the interventions available to reduce infection by these bacteria. There are different types of vaccines available: the inactivated vaccines and the oral vaccines. We did not find any randomized controlled trials assessing these vaccines in people with sickle cell diseases. We therefore conclude that there is a need for a randomized controlled trial to assess the benefits and risks of the different types of vaccines to evaluate the potential for improving survival and decreasing mortality from salmonella infections in people with sickle cell disease.  
cochrane.org
almost 6 years ago
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16

Needle size for vaccination procedures in children and adolescents | Cochrane

Vaccines contain antigens that make our immune system produce antibodies that can protect against disease. Antigens are modified or partial forms of the virus, bacteria, or the toxin that cause the disease that the vaccine protects against. Because the antigen is altered from its original form it cannot cause disease, but it can produce an immune response.  
cochrane.org
almost 6 years ago
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6

Vaccines for women to prevent tetanus in newborn babies | Cochrane

Review question: Our review evaluated the existing evidence on immunisation with tetanus toxoid in women of reproductive age for the prevention of tetanus and death in newborn babies and to determine whether serious harms are associated with tetanus toxoid exposure.  
cochrane.org
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
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2

Ebola: evaluating vaccines during epidemics

Will vaccines be effective? Would trials be ethical? Are trials even required? These are some of the questions that dominated health policy discourse throughout the current Ebola tragedy in West Africa. The epidemic of Ebola viral disease resulted in almost 27 000 cases, more than 11 000 deaths, and crippled already weak public health infrastructures.1 The welcome reduction in numbers of cases has, however, produced another conundrum and highlighted the challenges in evaluating the efficacy of vaccines in the middle of unpredictable epidemics. The linked paper by the Ebola ça suffit ring vaccination trial consortium (doi:10.1136/bmj.h3740) describes a novel trial design using “ring vaccination” to test one of the early Ebola vaccine candidates (rVSV-ZEBOV) in Guinea.2 The dwindling number of cases means that phase III studies may not have enough power to demonstrate or rule out efficacy using the gold standard of individual randomisation trials.3 Since we still do not have markers for correlates of protection against the Ebola virus, we need efficacy studies …  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
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4

Highlighting risk of diseases is most effective in changing attitudes to vaccines, US study finds

Giving people information about the dangers posed by communicable diseases is more persuasive at convincing sceptics of the benefits of vaccination than trying to counter misconceptions about vaccine risks, a US study has shown.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 6 years ago
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4

WHO | Vaccine hesitancy: A growing challenge for immunization programmes

People who delay or refuse vaccines for themselves or their children are a growing challenge for countries seeking to close the immunization gap. Globally, 1 in 5 children still do not receive routine life-saving immunizations, and an estimated 1.5 million children still die each year of diseases that could be prevented by vaccines that already exist, according to WHO.  
who.int
over 5 years ago