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19
354

Cardiovascular Exam

A beginner's guide to examining the cardiovascular system -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
about 3 years ago
Preview
19
1428

Trust Me, I'm a PA Student: Anatomy Tips and Tricks for Physician Assistant Students

So just a friendly fyi, most of this material was actually compiled/created by medical students from the Class of 2015 while they were TAing the PA and PT students. Many of these mnemonics and tips were handed down to them from prior years as well. I'm glad you found them helpful!  
doseofpa.blogspot.co.uk
about 1 year ago
Preview
10
129

Intramuscular And Subcutaneous Injections - Clinical Skills

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates the principles and techniques underlying intramuscular and subcutaneous injections.It is part of a series of videos covering clinical skills and is linked to Oxford Medical Education (www.oxfordmedicaleducation.com) This video was produced in collaboration with Oxford Medical Illustration - a department of Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. For more information, please visit www.oxfordmi.nhs.uk  
Nicole Chalmers
about 3 years ago
Preview
6
71

Abdominal Exam

A beginner's guide to examining the abdomen -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
about 3 years ago
Preview
5
57

In the Hands

What to look for in the hands when performing a general clinical examination -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
about 3 years ago
Preview
4
72

Pulses of the Lower Limb

A beginner's guide to finding the peripheral pulses in the lower limb -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
about 3 years ago
Preview
4
129

Intro to EKG Interpretation - The 5 Cardinal Rules

Never trust the computer, use a systematic method, consider the clinical context with synthesizing findings, compare current EKG to prior, and EKG is just on...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
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2
53

Intro to EKG Interpretation - The 5 Cardinal Rules

Never trust the computer, use a systematic method, consider the clinical context with synthesizing findings, compare current EKG to prior, and EKG is just on...  
YouTube
over 2 years ago
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1
52

Overview of Anaesthesia

Exploring the principles of anaesthesia, featuring exclusive interviews with Dr Ralston and his colleagues of Wirral University Teaching Hospital, NHS Trust....  
YouTube
over 2 years ago
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1
24

In the Face

What to look for in the face when performing a general clinical examination -- perfect for the medical student on their first placement. Far from comprehensive, but an excellent starting point if you're not quite sure what approach to take. Part of our series on basic clinical examination. If you enjoyed this video, why not subscribe for all the latest from HippocraTV? And let us know what you'd like us to cover next -- like all good educationalists, we can't get enough of that sweet, sweet feedback. Now get out there and see some patients! Music: Brittle Raille by Kevin Macleod Cool Vibes by Kevin Macleod Dub Feral by Kevin Macleod Local Forecast by Kevin Macleod Groove Grove by Kevin Macleod (all via the wonderful Incompetech.com) Special thanks to Harrison Ferguson Disclaimer: HippocraTV is not affiliated with any medical school or NHS trust. While we make a great effort to ensure our content is correct and up-to-date, watching YouTube is not a substitute for reading a textbook, attending a lecture or seeing a real-life patient.  
Hippocrates
about 3 years ago
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4
53

Dr Mark Newbold: Why should doctors get involved in management?

Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of the Heart of England Foundation Trust, lectures as part of the Alumni Leadership Talks series.  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
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4
15

Healthcare & Life Sciences Summit - Tim Smart, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Tim Smart, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, speaking at the Healthcare & Life Sciences Summit during the British Business Embassy on 2 August 2012.  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
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2
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Care.data: trust is on the line

The delay in rolling out care.data is an opportunity to respond to concerns and preserve trust in the doctor-patient relationship, says Pallavi Bradshaw  
the Guardian
almost 3 years ago
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2
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NHS online patient feedback reviews open to abuse - BBC News

The NHS removes all but one of 653 patient reviews of a healthcare trust from its website, after Newsnight finds the system is open to abuse.  
BBC News
almost 3 years ago
3601a97e79de3c1940517d2558dbcb06
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Mr Tim Smart “Learning to Lead” - Birmingham Medical Leadership Society Lecture 2

Last Wednesday (27/11/13) was Birmingham Medical Leadership Society’s second lecture in its autumn series on why healthcare professionals should become involved in management and leadership. Firstly, a really big thank you to Mr Smart for travelling all the way to Birmingham for free (!) to speak to us. It was a brilliant event and certainly sparked some debate. A second big thank you to Michelle and Angie – the University of Birmingham Alumni and marketing team who helped organise this event and recorded it – a video will hopefully be available online soon. Mr Tim Smart is the CEO of King’s NHS Foundation Trust and has been for the last few years – a period in which King’s has had some of the most successive hospital statistics in the UK. Is there a secret to managing such a successful hospital? “It’s a people business. Patients are what we are here for and we must never forget that” Mr Smart doesn’t enjoy giving lectures, so instead he had an “intimate chat” covering his personal philosophy of why we as medical students and junior doctors should consider a career in management at some point. Good managers should be people persons. Doctors are selected for being good at talking to and listening to people – these are directly translatable skills. Good managers should be team leaders. Medicine is becoming more and more a team occupation, we are all trained to work, think and act as a team and especially doctors are expected to know how to lead this team. Again, a directly transferable skill. Good managers need to know how to make decisions based on incomplete knowledge and basic statistics. Doctors make life-altering clinical decisions every day based statistics and incomplete knowledge. A very important directly transferable skill. Good managers get out of their offices, meet the staff and walk around their empires. Doctors, whether surgeons, GP’s or radiologists have to walk around the hospitals on their routine business and have to deal with a huge variety of staff from every level. To be a great doctor you need to know how to get the best out of the staff around you, to get the tasks done that your patients’ need. Directly transferable skills. Good managers are quick on the up-take and are always looking for new ways to improve their departments. Doctors have to stay on top of the literature and are committed to a life-time of learning new and complex topics. Directly transferable. Good managers are honest and put in place systems that try to prevent bad situations occurring again. Good doctors are honest and own up when they make a mistake, they then try to ensure that that mistake isn’t made again. Directly Transferable. Even good managers sometimes have difficulties getting doctors to do what they want – because the managers are not doctors. Doctors that become managers still have the professional reputation of a doctor. A very transferable asset that can be used to encourage their colleagues to do what should be done. A good manager values their staff – especially the nurses. A good doctor knows just how important the nurses, ODP, physio’s and other healthcare professionals and hospital staff are. This is one of the best reasons why doctors should get involved with management. We understand the front line. We know the troops. We know the problems. We are more than capable of thinking of some of the solutions! “Project management isn’t magic” “Everything done within a hospital should be to benefit patients – therefore everything in the hospital should be answerable to patients, including the hospital shop!” “Reward excellence, otherwise you get mediocrity” At the present The University of Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society is in contact with the FMLM and other similar groups at the Universities of Bristol, Barts and Oxford. We are looking to get in contact with every other society in the country. If you are a new or old MLS then please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you and are happy to help your societies in any way we can – we would also love to attend your events so please do send us an invite. Email us at med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @UoBMedLeaders Find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Come along to our up coming events… Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust Wednesday 22nd January 2014 LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Has the NHS lost the ability to care?’ – responding to the Mid Staffs inquiry’ By Prof Jon Glasby, Director of the Health Services Management Centre , UoB Thursday 20th February LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Creating a Major Trauma Unit at the UHB Trust’ By Sir Prof Keith Porter, Professor of Traumatology, UHB Saturday 8th March LT3 Medical School, 1pm ‘Applying the Theory of Constraints to Healthcare By Mr A Dinham and J Nieboer ,QFI Consulting  
jacob matthews
about 3 years ago
Dc0a4c6f5711bc417c4f07eb84973bd9
7
10640

The Hypocrite's Oath

A medical student reflects on exams: the pressure to perform, and the temptation to cheat (original post here) New and naive the journey begins, Forsaking folly for study and service, To "make the world a better place", To "alleviate suffering" to "give hope". The public trust, respect, maybe even revere us. They offer us their arms for a third attempt, They bleed and bruise so we can learn, Enduring pain for our practice. They think our vocation "the noblest of professions". Their trust they freely offer, We snatch it, thinking ourselves worthy, Considering ourselves men of noble blood, Trustworthy, moral and virtuous beings. Hours, days, years invested in books, Given in worship to the acquisition of knowledge. On wards we arrive in dress rehearsal, Regurgitating information at the whim of the gods. We desire their glory and brilliance, Panting for success, respect, power, control, Nothing terrifies more than failure, Exams loom incessantly... Offers of assistance entice. Tantalising tip-offs tempt, Some sharpen skills whilst others sully their souls. Time to swear the Hypocrite's Oath.  
David Jones
almost 4 years ago
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1
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Orthopaedic examination videos

Freedom of Information  |  Disclaimer  |  Accessibility  |  Sitemap © 2016 Copyright University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust  
uhcw.nhs.uk
over 2 years ago
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0
6

Between Trust and Accountability: Different Perspectives on... : Academic Medicine

Purpose: Postgraduate medical training was reformed to be more responsive to changing societal needs  
journals.lww.com
almost 3 years ago
5
6
64

Physician Don’t Heal Thyself

By Genevieve Yates One reason why I chose to do medicine was that I didn’t always trust doctors – another being access to an endless supply of jelly beans. My mistrust stemmed from my family’s unfortunate collection of medical misadventures: Grandpa’s misdiagnosed and ultimately fatal cryptococcal meningitis, my brother’s missed L4/L5 fracture, Dad’s iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and the stuffing-up of my radius and ulna fractures, to name a few. I had this naïve idea that my becoming a doctor would allow me to be more in charge of the health of myself and my family. When I discovered that doctors were actively discouraged from treating themselves, their loved ones and their mothers-in-law, and that a medical degree did not come with a lifetime supply of free jelly beans, I felt cheated. I got over the jelly bean disappointment quickly – after all, the allure of artificially coloured and flavoured gelatinous sugar lumps was far less strong at age 25 than it was at age 5 – but the Medical Board’s position regarding self-treatment took a lot longer to swallow. Over the years I’ve come to understand why guidelines exist regarding treating oneself and one’s family, as well as close colleagues, staff and friends. Lack of objectivity is not the only problem. Often these types of consults occur in informal settings and do not involve adequate history taking, examination or note-making. They can start innocently enough but have the potential to run into serious ethical and legal minefields. I’ve come to realise that, like having an affair with your boss or lending your unreliable friend thousands of dollars to buy a car, treating family, friends and staff is a pitfall best avoided. Although we’ve all heard that “A physician who heals himself has an idiot for a doctor and a fool for a patient”, large numbers of us still self-treat. I recently conducted a self-care session with about thirty very experienced GP supervisors whose average age was around fifty. When asked for a show of hands as to how many had his/her own doctor, about half the group confidently raised their hands. I then asked these to lower their hands if their nominated doctor was a spouse, parent, practice partner or themselves. At least half the hands went down. When asked if they’d seek medical attention if they were significantly unwell, several of the remainder said, “I don’t get sick,” and one said, “Of course I’d see a doctor – I’d look in the mirror.” Us girls are a bit more likely to seek medical assistance than the blokes (after all, it is pretty difficult to do your own PAP smear – believe me, I’ve tried), but neither gender group can be held up as a shining example of responsible, compliant patients. It seems very much a case of “Do as I say, not do as I do”. I wonder how much of this is due to the rigorous “breed ’em tough” campaigns we’ve been endured from the earliest days of our medical careers. I recall when one of my fellow interns asked to finish her DEM shift twenty minutes early so that she could go to the doctor. Her supervising senior registrar refused her request and told her, “Routine appointments need to be made outside shift hours. If you are sick enough to be off work, you should be here as a patient.” My friend explained that this was neither routine, nor a life-threatening emergency, but that she thought she had a urinary tract infection. She was instructed to cancel her appointment, dipstick her own urine, take some antibiotics out of the DEM supply cupboard and get back to work. “You’re a doctor now; get your priorities right and start acting like one” was the parting message. Through my work in medical education, I’ve had the opportunity to talk to several groups of junior doctors about self-care issues and the reasons for imposing boundaries on whom they treat, hopefully encouraging to them to establish good habits while they are young and impressionable. I try to practise what I preach: I see my doctor semi-regularly and have a I’d-like-to-help-you-but-I’m-not-in-a-position-to-do-so mantra down pat. I’ve used this speech many times to my advantage, such as when I’ve been asked to look at great-aunt Betty’s ulcerated toe at the family Christmas get-together, and to write a medical certificate and antibiotic script for a whingey boyfriend with a man-cold. The message is usually understood but the reasons behind it aren’t always so. My niece once announced knowledgably, “Doctors don’t treat family because it’s too hard to make them pay the proper fee.” This young lady wants to be a doctor when she grows up, but must have different reasons than I did at her age. She doesn’t even like jelly beans! Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 3 years ago
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1
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Teen cancer patients 'inspired' by Sutton charity boost - BBC News

Teen cancer patients have been "inspired" by Stephen Sutton - a teenager with terminal cancer who has has raised more than £2m for the Teenage Cancer Trust.  
BBC News
almost 3 years ago