New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview 300x225
4
153

Haemothorax

This image displays a large left sided haemothorax with mediastinal displacement to the opposite side. Clinically the patient would be in respiratory distress - percussion of the left side of the chest would be dull and breath sounds and vocal resonance would be reduced. A Haemothorax such as this falls into the category of life threatening chest injuries (ATOMFC) and requires emergent treatment using a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space, mid-axillary line and treatment according to ALS or ATLS protocols. ATOMFC = A = airway obstruction, T = tension pneumothorax, O = open pneumothorax, M = massive haemothorax, F = flail chest, C = cardiac tamponade.  
Rhys Clement
about 9 years ago
Preview 300x365
12
833

Pleural effusion x-ray (left-sided)

This PA Chest X-Ray demonstrates a left sided pleural effusion. In this condition fluid collects between the parietal and visceral pleura and appears as a shadowy fluid level on the X-Ray with obliteration of the costophrenic angles. If you were to examine this patient they might be in respiratory distress from reduced oxygen uptake (so have low sats, high resp rate, possible cyanosis and accessory muscle useage) - they may have reduced chest expansion on the affected side and it would be stony dull to percussion. Fluid transmits sound poorly so breath sounds would be decreased as would vocal resonance/fremitus. Someone with consolidation may have very similar clinical findings but the underlying area of lung is almost solid due to pus from the infective process - as sounds travel well through solids they would have increased vocal fremitus which is how you can clinically differentiate between the two conditions. Clinical examination and understanding of conditions is paramount to practice effective medicine. Before you recieved this X-Ray you should be able to diagnose the condition and use the X-Ray to confirm your suspicions.  
Rhys Clement
about 9 years ago
Preview 300x246
9
338

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
about 9 years ago
Preview 300x246
4
116

Chest X-ray

Note the calcified granuloma in the right upper zone (an important differential being malignancy). Note also the left lower lobe collapse ('sail sign' behind the heart). If you look closely you will see the abscence of the lower ribs leading you to the conclusion that the patient has, at some point, undergone a thoracotomy. You can also see surgical clips in the stomach.  
Tim Ritzmann
about 9 years ago
Preview 300x246
6
104

Chest x-Ray

Left Sided Pleural effusion. The most common cause of this presentation is malignancy. It is important to consider the source of a possible primary. It may also be necessary to obtain a sample of the effusion fluid to determine whether it is a transudate or an exudate, using Light's criteria as a guide. Exudate contains greater levels of protein than a transudate reflecting it's often inflammatory origin as the blood vessels become 'leaky' to protein molecules. The differential diagnosis for bilateral pleural effusions is different again. Consider 'failure' e.g. heart, renal or hepatic.  
Tim Ritzmann
about 9 years ago
0
2
15

Focus On: Ultrasound Detection of Traumatic Anterior Pneumothorax

Early detection of a pneumothorax may be important in the clinical management of a trauma patient. Supine chest radiographs in the immobilized trauma patient have been shown to be insensitive.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
2
1
17

Peak Inspiratory Pressure: Physiological Determinants

Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) the center of a great deal of discussion of ventilator management.&nbsp;&nbsp; Knowing the factors that increase or decrease PIP are important to those managing critically ill patient.&nbsp; This podcast is steeped in physiology and perhaps more difficult than my typical podcasts.&nbsp; PIP=&nbsp; [Tv/ (Compliance Lung &amp; Thorax)] + (Resistance of airway + flow )<br/>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago
2
1
26

Podcast: a history of chest pain

Today we are focussing on chest pain and listening to a patient describe their problems. Chest pain is is one of the most common reasons to be seen and assessed on an emergency department in the UK. Listen to the patient and try to diagnose &#8211; then see what our diagnosis is for the chest [...]  
Medical Educator
over 8 years ago
1
1
121

Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis by David Denning

Prof. Denning describes chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) as a long-term invasive disease, generally episodic in nature. Common symptoms are cough, shortness of breath, weight loss, tiredness, coughing up blood and aching or discomfort of the chest.  
Aspergillus Website
over 8 years ago
Preview
11
200

Anatomy of the thorax

Surface anatomy cardio respiratory system IVC- approx 20cm runningdownon righthandside of vertebral column. Sternal angle Suprasternal/JugularNotch Apex of the…  
fsdfsdf dgfdsfs
over 7 years ago
30177
4
84

Chest Examination

This chest examination video is part of the MedPrep tutorial video series: http://www.medprep.in/clinical-examination-videos.php which has received 20,000+ views on Youtube. The videos are designed to be concise and engaging, at times with humour. I hope you enjoy viewing them and find them useful.  
Soton
over 6 years ago
Preview
16
725

An interesting chest x-ray

Case-based X-ray Interpretation with Questions.  
Anna-Maria Paes
almost 6 years ago
Preview
4
194

Chest and Abdomen Radiology

Radiology Teaching 19/11/12 – 23/11/12  
Aoibhin McGarrity
almost 6 years ago
Preview
1
78

Golden S sign - radiology video tutorial (x-ray)

Golden S sign - a chest radiograph sign of right upper lobe collapse due to an obstructing central mass, most often primary lung cancer.  
Radiopaedia
over 5 years ago
Preview
3
308

Cases in Radiology: Episode 3 (pediatric, chest x-ray)

In this episode we take a look at a basic but important paediatric chest radiograph case with a practical discussion of management and follow-up. View the case in Radopaedia quiz mode here: http://goo.gl/u65js  
Radiopaedia
over 5 years ago
Preview
4
40

Side-effects of radiotherapy

Side-effects of radiotherapy Common acute side-effects  Reddening and soreness of the skin  Discomfort and swelling of breast or chest area  Fatigue Common …  
Stephen McAleer
over 5 years ago
Preview
0
30

Insertion of a surgical chest drain

Surgical chest drain insertion Joshil Lodhia CT1, Cardiothoracic Surgery University Hospital of South Manchester  
Dr. Joshil Lodhia
almost 5 years ago
5
4
48

ECG Interpretation - Predicted Normal ECG - Chest Leads

Using the basic principles outlined in our previous videos we can easily predict the morphology of the ECG read-out in the 6 chest leads. http://www.acadoodle.com Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
almost 5 years ago
Preview
11
339

ECG Interpretation - ECG Lead Perspectives

http://www.acadoodle.com The different leads of the ECG examine cardiac electrical activity from different perspectives. In this video we teach you the perspectives of the 12 ECG leads on cardiac depolarosiation and repolarisation. We consider the 12 leads in two groups of six, with the six chest leads (V1-V6, also referred to as the precordial leads) examining the flow of cardiac depolarisation and repolarisation in the horizontal plan and a second group of six leads (the standard leads and augmented leads) which examine these events in the vertical plane. For the experienced practitioner, looking at different areas on the ECG readout is like looking at different anatomical regions of the heart. Also, understanding the lead perspectives is crucial in the interpretation of cardiac arrhythmias. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
almost 5 years ago