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SurgicalProcedures,Operative

Category

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4459

Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

Featuring clinical anatomy, multiple image modalities (cadaveric images, animations and surface anatomy) and finally, a self-assessment quiz.  
Kishan Moosai
almost 7 years ago
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27
622

Beating the Bully

I read an article recently that 90% of surgical trainees have experienced bullying of one form or other in their practice. That’s 90%. That’s shocking. Worryingly it is highly likely that this statistic is not purely isolated to surgery. This is evidence of a major problem that needs to be addressed. We don’t accept bullying in schools and in the workplace policies are in place to stop bullying and harassment– so why have 90% of trainees experienced bullying? I can relate to this from personal experience, as I am sure most of us can. Prior to intercalating I had always had the typical med student ambition of joining the big league and taking on surgery. I had a keen interest in anatomy, I had decided to intercalate in anatomy, I did an SSC on surgical robotics, presented at an undergraduate surgical conference and had a small exposure to surgery in my first couple of years that gave me enough drive to take on a competitive career path. I took it upon myself to try and arrange a brief summer attachment where I would learn as a clinical medical student what it is like to scrub in and be in theatre. At the beginning I was so excited. At the end every time someone mentioned surgery I felt sick. It became apparent very quickly that I was an inconvenience. I think medical students all get this feeling – ‘being in the way’ - but this was different. This was being made to feel deliberately uncomfortable. I asked if I could have some guidance on scrubbing in and this was met with a complete huff and annoyance because I didn’t know how to do it properly (thank goodness for a lovely team of theatre nurses!). I even got assigned a pet name for the week – the ‘limpet’ (notable for their clinging on to rocks) that was frequently used as a humiliation tactic in front of colleagues. By the end of the week I dreaded walking into the hospital and felt physically sick every morning. Now some people might say ‘man up’ and get on with it. Fair enough, but I’m a fairly resilient character and it takes a lot to make me feel like I did that week. This experience completely eradicated any ambition I had at the time to go into surgery. Since then I’ve focused elsewhere and generally dreaded surgical rotations until very recently where I managed to meet a wonderful orthopaedic team who were incredibly encouraging. Bullying can be subjective. Just because a consultant asks you a difficult question doesn’t mean they’re bullying you. By and large clinicians want to stretch you and trigger buttons that make you go and look things up. If it drives you to work and develops you as a professional then it’s not bullying, but if it makes you feel rubbish, sick or less about yourself then you should perhaps think twice about the way you’re being treated. Of course bullying doesn’t stop at professionals. Psychological bullying is rife in medical schools. We’ve all been ‘psyched out’ by our peers – how much do you know? How did you know that when I didn’t? Intimidating behaviour can be just as aggressive. Americans dub these people ‘Gunners’ although we’ve been rather nice and adopted the word ‘keen’ instead. Luckily most medical schools have a port of call for this sort of behaviour. But a word of advice – don’t let anyone shrug it off. If it’s a problem, if it’s affecting you – tell someone. Bullying individuals that are trying to learn and develop as professionals is entirely unacceptable. If you would like to share similar experiences, drop them in the comments box below.  
Lucas Brammar
about 5 years ago
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23
3468

Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair

Learn about the key preperitoneal anatomy that laparoscopic surgeons must consider when repairing inguinal hernias.  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Preview
20
432

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interpreting lumbar puncture

A short presentation on the anatomy of CSF circulation and lumbar puncture interpretation.  
Phil Byass
over 6 years ago
Preview
17
609

Live Surgery! Clinical Utilisation Of Fractional Flow Reserve In Multi-Vessel Disease

Live Case from the Hammersmith Hospital, UK - Clinical Utilisation Of Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) In Multi-Vessel Disease (MVD). By Radcliffe Cardiology.  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
Preview
15
327

Gastroenterology Presentation (& some Abdominal Surgery Stuff!)

Another presentation covering the GI tract. All information is from NICE guidance & Clinical Knowledge Summaries & Oxford Handbooks. Images either made by me or from Google. Feedback is appreciated and please check out my other presentations!  
Conrad Hayes
about 6 years ago
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15
1314

Spinal Tap Procedure (Lumbar Puncture)

A spinal tap, also called lumbar puncture, is used to take a sample of the fluid from the spinal column to look for infection or bleeding.  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
Preview
13
294

Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting

Coronary angioplasty and stenting is done to open up blood vessels in the heart. You may need the procedure after a heart attack, or if your vessels are clog...  
youtube.com
almost 3 years ago
Preview
9
136

Rotation in breast surgery

Comprehensive and succint notes from Breast surgery rotation  
Naz
over 6 years ago
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9
290

A Comedy of Errors

Great people make mistakes. Unfortunately, medicine is a subject where mistakes are not tolerated. Doctors are supposed to be infallible; or, at least, that is the present dogma. Medical students regularly fall victim to expecting too much of themselves, but this is perhaps not a bad trait when enlisting as a doctor. If it weren’t for mistakes in our understanding, then we wouldn’t progress. Studying a BSc in Anatomy has exposed me to the real world of science – where the negative is just as important as the positive. What isn’t there is just as important as what is. If you look into the history of Anatomy, it truly is a comedy of errors. So, here are three top mistakes by three incredibly influential figures who still managed to be remembered for the right reasons. 3. A Fiery Stare Culprit: Alcmaeon of Croton Go back far enough and you’ll bump into someone called Alcmaeon. Around the 5th century, he was one of the first dissectors – but not an anatomist. Alcmaeon was concerned with human intellect and was desperately searching for the seat of the soul. He made a number of major errors - quite understandable for his time! Alcmaeon insisted that sleep occurs when the blood vessels filled and we wake when they empty. Perhaps the most outrageous today is the fact that he insisted the eyes contained water both fire and water… Don’t be quick to mock. Alcmaeon identified the optic tract, the brain as the seat of the mind (along with Herophilus) and the Eustachian tubes. 2. Heart to Heart Culprit: Claudius Galen Legend has it that Galen’s father had a dream in which an angel/deity visited him and told him that his son would be a great physician. That would have to make for a pretty impressive opening line in a personal statement by today’s standards. Galen was highly influential on modern day medicine and his treatise of Anatomy and healing lasted for over a thousand years. Many of Galen’s mistakes were due to his dissections of animals rather than humans. Unfortunately, dissection was banned in Galen’s day and where his job as physician to the gladiators provided some nice exposed viscera to study, it did not allow him to develop a solid foundation. Galen’s biggest mistake lay in the circulation. He was convinced that blood flowed in a back and forth, ebb-like motion between the chambers of the heart and that it was burnt by muscle for fuel. Many years later, great physician William Harvey proposed our modern understanding of circulation. 1. The Da Vinci Code Culprit: Leonardo Da Vinci If you had chance to see the Royal Collection’s latest exhibition then you were in for a treat. It showcased the somewhat overlooked anatomical sketches of Leonardo Da Vinci. A man renowned for his intelligence and creativity, Da Vinci also turns out to be a pretty impressive anatomist. In his sketches he produces some of the most advanced 3D representations of the human skeleton, muscles and various organs. One theory of his is, however, perplexing. In his sketches is a diagram of the spinal cord……linked to penis. That’s right, Da Vinci was convinced the two were connected (no sexist comments please) and that semen production occurred inside the brain and spinal cord, being stored and released at will. He can be forgiven for the fact that he remarkably corrected himself some years later. His contributions to human physiology are astounding for their time including identification of a ‘hierarchal’ nervous system, the concept of equal ‘inheritence’ and identification of the retina as a ‘light sensing organ’. The list of errors is endless. However, they’re not really errors. They’re signposts that people were thinking. All great people fail, otherwise they wouldn’t be great.  
Lucas Brammar
over 5 years ago
Preview
9
394

Lower GI Bleeds Tutorial - including partial colectomy and disposition

This is a continuation of the GI bleed set of videos. The first one is on Upper GI bleeds.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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8
256

Lego Surgery - Crohn's Disease, Small Bowel Resection

Welcome back to the LEGO Operating Room! In this episode, Dr Balfour discusses surgery for Crohn's Disease and explains the operation of a small bowel resect...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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8
359

Live Dissection of the Liver

After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to describe and identify gross anatomy of the liver.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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7
111

UAB does virtual surgery with VIPAAR and Google Glass

A University of Alabama at Birmingham surgical team has performed one of the first surgeries using a virtual augmented reality technology from VIPAAR in conjunction…  
Vimeo
about 5 years ago
How to suction a tracheostomy tube
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360

How to Suction a Tracheostomy Tube

Suction a tracheostomy tube in three steps.  
nursebuff.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
7
154

Heart and coronary circulation - dissection

This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video, it...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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6
175

The Surgery Rotation

University of Pennsylvania Medical School Spoof 2004 video about the surgery clerkship. In part because of this video, and in part because of too many students failing the shelf (final exam), the clerkship was changed.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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6
116

Successful liver transplantation using Facebook

In January 2012 I wrote about a girl who had created a Facebook page because she urgently needed a liver. In August 2004 I had a car accident in Germany, where damaged my limbs and some of my internal organs. That's why I need a liver URGENTLY! Over 26.000 people (family members, doctors, nurses, her friends and students from all parts of the country) followed and liked her page in 3 months. Finally she'd found a suitable liver, and she is fine now. I believe that our generation of health care professionals should be prepared for this and should provide meaningful help, because in the future we can not avoid patients who are interested in social media. E-patients will increasingly use web 2.0 tools as part of their health management and we must respond to that.  
Zoltán Cserháti
over 6 years ago
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129

Sequential graft in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Selective graft angiogram after coronary artery bypass graft surgery to demonstrate sequential graft  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago