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5
51

Anaesthesia choice in Total Hip Replacement

The choice of anaesthetic in primary total hip replacement surgery – which gives the best perioperative outcome?  
Zara Edwards
almost 10 years ago
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196

A Rough Guide to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

A rough guide to abdominal aortic aneurysms By Nick Harper  
Nick Harper
almost 9 years ago
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CT demonstrating Aortic Dissection

This is a contrast enhanced CT image of the abdomen with the contrast in the arterial phase highlighting the aorta. We can see what appears to be two seperate lumens on this image and this is because this is an aortic dissection.  
Rhys Clement
almost 9 years ago
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9
320

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
almost 9 years ago
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3261

Hernia Examination

In this video Miss Tierney demonstrates how to examine a Hernia.  
Rhys Clement
almost 9 years ago
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184

Stomas

Mr Jon Lund talks to Liz Evans a specialist stoma nurse about the different types of abdominal stomas. More content can be found at www.surgeryandmedicine.com  
Rhys Clement
almost 9 years ago
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17

Developing and maintaining an assessment system

Developing and maintaining an assessment syste - a PMETB guide to good practice. Defines good practice in assessment and examinations in all of medicine and surgery. Gives a lexicon of medical education terminology. Published 2007.  
Chris Oliver
over 8 years ago
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157

Surgical knot tying

This is a really nice demonstration of some of the basic surgical knots. It is slowed down so that it is much easier to follow than the vast majority of videos on YouTube and I think it is a nice video  
Rhys Clement
over 8 years ago
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10

Focus On: Ultrasound-Guided Lumbar Puncture

In the emergency department, lumbar punctures are most commonly performed to determine the presence of an infectious process (meningitis, encephalitis, sepsis, etc.) or subarachnoid hemorrhage  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
about 8 years ago
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138

Priapism and Hematuria

<p>Why is a 12 hour erection a bad thing? How should we manage the patient with bloody urine? A curbside consult with urologist Brian Shaffer, MD.&nbsp;</p <p>Your emails</p <p>An unusual southern accent</p <p>and much more...</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><em><strong><span style="font-size: x-large; color: #0000ff;">Urology Primer</span></strong></em></p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Priapism<span style="font-size: 10px; font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;a rare condition that causes a persistent, and often painful, penile erection.</span></span></strong></p <p>&nbsp;</p <p>Priapism is drug induced, injury related, or caused by disease, not sexual desire. As in a normal erection, the penis fills with blood and becomes erect. However, unlike a normal erection that dissipates after sexual activity ends, the persistent erection caused by priapism is maintained because the blood in the penile shaft does not drain. The shaft remains hard, while the tip of the penis is soft. If it is not relieved promptly, priapism can lead to permanent scarring of the penis and inability to have a normal erection.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Clot retention</span></strong></p <p>blood clots in the bladder prevent urine emptying</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Coude Catheter</strong></span></p <p>a semi-rigid catheter that has a curve or bend at the tip. The curved tip allows it to navigate over the curvature of the prostate or any other urethral obstruction it may encounter. A Coude catheter is specifically designed for this purpose. Coude catheters are available in size 8 French to size 26 French.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">De Novo</span></strong></p <p>The Latin expression de novo literally means something akin to "from the beginning" or "anew"</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Interstitial cystitis</span></strong></p <p>also called painful bladder syndrome &mdash; is a chronic condition characterized by a combination of uncomfortable bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pain in your pelvis, which can range from mild burning or discomfort to severe pain.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Cystoscopy</span></strong></p <p>the use of a scope (cystoscope) to examine the bladder. This is done either to look at the bladder for abnormalities or to help with surgery being performed on the inside of the urinary tract (transurethral surgery).</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">CT Urogram</span></strong></p <p>A urogram is a radiograph, or X-ray image, of the urinary tract.&nbsp;</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">TURP</span></strong></p <p>transurethral resection of the prostate</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Foley catheter</span></strong></p <p>a thin, sterile tube inserted into the bladder to drain urine. Because it can be left in place in the bladder for a period of time, it is also called an indwelling catheter. It is held in place with a balloon at the end, which is filled with sterile water to hold it in place. The urine drains into a bag and can then be taken from an outlet device to be drained</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Rob Orman, MD
about 8 years ago
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1
18

Pancreatitis - Surgical Indications and Procedures

<p>This is the third in the series on severe pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis. &nbsp;This episode reviews the indications for surgery, morbidity and mortality of surgery, and what are the surgical options. &nbsp;</p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 8 years ago
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Cardiovascular Risk Reduction for Surgery

This episode explores what is needed to make surgery safer for the patient with cardiovascular disease.&nbsp;  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 8 years ago
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Early Surgery Improves Outcomes Following Critical Burns

<p>Early surgical excision is likely to be the most significant individual variable to imporve the outcome of a patient (adult or child) with a critical burn.&nbsp; Nevertheless, many nonburn physicians still want to apply to 1970 treatment paradigms to this population of injured patients.&nbsp;&nbsp; This episode will hopefull replace these falsehoods with fact supported in the literature.&nbsp; </p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 8 years ago
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Q&A on Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer: Introduction and Role after Surgery, by Dr. Alex Lin (audio)

<p <p>Q&amp;A session following presentation on history &amp; general approaches for radiation, with focus on head/neck cancer, by Dr. Alex Lin, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.</p </p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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Q&A on Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer: Introduction and Role after Surgery, by Dr. Alex Lin (video)

<p <p>Q&amp;A session following presentation on history &amp; general approaches for radiation, with focus on head/neck cancer, by Dr. Alex Lin, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.</p </p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer: Introduction and Role after Surgery, by Dr. Alex Lin (Audio)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Lecture on history and general approaches for radiation, with specific attention to its role in post-operative treatment of head/neck cancer, by Dr. Alex Lin, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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17

Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer: Introduction and Role after Surgery, by Dr. Alex Lin (Video)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Lecture on history and general approaches for radiation, with specific attention to its role in post-operative treatment of head/neck cancer, by Dr. Alex Lin, Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania.</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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Should Surgery be Considered for Very Limited Small Cell Lung Cancer? (audio)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dr. Howard (Jack) West, medical oncologist, President &amp; CEO of GRACE, reviews the debate about whether surgery should have a role in managing early small cell lung cancer (SCLC).</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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Should Surgery be Considered for Very Limited Small Cell Lung Cancer? (video)

<p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dr. Howard (Jack) West, medical oncologist, President &amp; CEO of GRACE, reviews the debate about whether surgery should have a role in managing early small cell lung cancer (SCLC).</span></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago
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1
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The Role of Surgery in Management of NSCLC (Audio)

This slide presentation by Dr. Ralph Aye, thoracic surgeon and Chief of the Thoracic Oncology Division at Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle, provides a general introduction to surgical management options for early stage non-small cell lung cancer.  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 8 years ago