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256

Microbiology - Staphylococcus Aureus and Skin Abscess

WATCH VIDEO ONE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPLV4h0Tr8c https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram:...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
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3
71

Microbiology - Staphylococcus Aureus and Skin Abscess

WATCH VIDEO ONE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPLV4h0Tr8c https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram:...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
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Cellulitis

A dermatological emergency!  
Zara Edwards
about 9 years ago
Ebbd472922665665f41314e1c89f67d3
2
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A curious epidemic of superficial accesses in Africa

This anecdote happened many years ago when I was a brand new (read: inexperienced) physician doing my stint in the Colonial Health Service of the former Belgian Congo. I was assigned to a small hospital in the interior of the Maniema province. Soft tissue infections and abscesses were rather common in this tropical climate, but at one time there seemed to be virtual epidemic of abscesses on the buttocks or upper arms. It seemed that patients with these abscesses were all coming from one area of the territory. That seemed rather odd and we started investigating. By way of background let me say that the hospital was also serving several outlying clinics or dispensaries in the territory. Health aides were assigned to a specific dispensary on a periodic basis. Patients would know his schedule and come to the dispensary for their treatments. Now this was the era of “penicillin.” The natives were convinced that this wonder drug would cure all their ailments, from malaria and dysentery, to headaches, infertility, and impotence. You name it and penicillin was thought to be the cure-all. No wonder they would like to get an injection of penicillin for whatever their ailment was. As our investigation demonstrated, the particular health aide assigned to the dispensary from where most of the abscesses came, would swipe a vial of penicillin and a bottle of saline from the hospital’s pharmacy on his way out to his assigned dispensary. When he arrived at his dispensary there was usually already a long line of patients waiting with various ailments. He would get out his vial of the “magic” penicillin, show the label to the crowd and pour it in the liter bottle of saline; shake it up and then proceed to give anyone, who paid five Belgian Francs (at that time equivalent to .10 US $), which he pocketed, an injection of the penicillin, now much diluted in the large bottle of physiologic solution. To make matters worse, he used only one syringe and one needle. No wonder there were so many abscesses in the area of injection. Of course we quickly put a stop to that. Anyone interested in reading more about my experience in Africa and many other areas can download a free e book via Smashwords at: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522 . The title of the book is "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path"  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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90

Amebic liver abscess - usmle imp points

Liver abscess is a pus-filled cyst in the liver. The liver is an organ in the digestive system that assists the digestive process and carries out many other ...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
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1
22

Left multiloculated empyema in lungs CT chest

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
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Management of Cellulitis in the Immunocompromised Patient - emdocs

Clinical practice update on the management of cellulitis, particularly in the immunocompromised patient population.  
emdocs.net
over 2 years ago
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HEM Podcast Episode 07- Pus and Stones

Let’s all talk about two things we love: pus and stones. Mel, Paul and their guest Lee Plantmason talk about the most recent literature on how to diagnose UTIs in patients with kidney stones. Subscribe to the podcast HERE and don't miss an episode.  
blog.hippoem.com
over 2 years ago
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Incision and loop drainage of cutaneous abscesses: What's the evidence?

This excellent article comes courtesy of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center senior resident Landon Krantz, MD – who performed a thorough literature review and wrote a concise, informative review of the titular technique.  
pemcincinnati.com
over 2 years ago
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trick-of-the-trade-peritonsillar-abscess-needle-aspiration

Trick of the Trade: Peritonsillar abscess needle drainage technique  
academiclifeinem.com
over 2 years ago
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Treatments for breast abscesses in breastfeeding women | Cochrane

Some women develop a breast abscess while breastfeeding, called a lactational breast abscess. An abscess is a collection of infected fluid within the breast tissue. The aim of treatment is to cure the abscess quickly and effectively, ensuring maximum benefit to the mother with minimal interruption of breastfeeding.  
cochrane.org
over 2 years ago
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the short coat: Breadth and Length - Antibiotics in Uncomplicated Cellulitis

Interesting and very useful post, Lauren. In Australia we generally use flucloxacillin or dicloxacillin as first line in cellulitis, as per our Antibiotic Guidelines, although it is recommended for 7-10 days. Do you use it in North America? It's got good strep and non-MRSA staph coverage and narrower spectrum than cephalexin, although the kids don't like the taste as much. We would typically use cephalexin as an alternative, and clindamycin if penicillin allergic or for MRSA. After reading your post I'll be encouraged to use shorter duration. Admittedly, I quite often use a 5 day course anyway due to the pack size of flucloxacillin, but at least now I've got some useful references to back me up!  
shortcoatsinem.blogspot.com
over 2 years ago
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Should we really be packing abscesses?

When I was first taught how to drain an abscess I was taught to pack most with ¼ inch gauze. Initially it was iodoform gauze, later just plain old ribbon gauze. As with many things I felt like it worked and had no impetus to change. Recently, I began to reconsider based on a review of the literature and experience at the bedside. A recent survey of 350 Emergency Department providers revealed that 91% of respondents routinely packed abscesses – I wonder if many of them are asking the same question about how we perform this procedure, and why there seems to be so much heterogeneity.  
pemcincinnati.com
over 2 years ago
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FDA Clears Adalimumab (Humira) for Hidradenitis Suppurativa

The TNF blocker becomes the first and only FDA-approved agent for treatment of moderate to severe hidradenitis suppurativa.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
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Podcast #13: Better Out than In (Simple Cutaneous Abscesses)

Case Presentation: Healthy 45yo man presents with a 3cm abscess under left arm. There is no surrounding cellulitis. He is not an  IV drug user and never had an abscess before. You make the diagnosis of an uncomplicated superficial cutaneous abscess. You know that antibiotics are probably not necessary after I&D. However, the patient gets nervous after you describe the I&D process. He wants to know if you can do anything to make this procedure less painful and if packing is really necessary?  
thesgem.com
over 2 years ago
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Tubo-ovarian Abscess: Pearls & Pitfalls - emdocs

Emergency Department Management of Tubo-ovarian Abscess  
emdocs.net
over 2 years ago
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Instead of packing an abscess try a drain

I’ve recently shared posts on Loop abscess and drainage as well as on the utility and need for packing abscesses. I’ve concluded, for the time being, that it is likely appropriate to pack abscesses greater than 5cm. But, is there something other than stuffing a bunch of gauze in there that would do the trick as well?  
pemcincinnati.com
over 2 years ago
Eml abscess answers
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Abscess, “Answers”

1.) Do you routinely pack abscesses after I & D? If so, what is your endpoint (i.e., when do you stop re-packing, and when do you stop ED follow-up)? Incision and drainage remains the cornerstone of therapy for simple cutaneous abscesses. The procedure entails administering analgesia/anesthesia, incising the abscess, probing to break up loculations, and…  
emlyceum.com
over 2 years ago