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35

Running through an IV line in 5 min

The basics of running through an IV line  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
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19

STI podcast: Running a prison sexual health service in the UK

Stream STI podcast: Running a prison sexual health service in the UK by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 6 years ago
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17

British Association of Sport Rehabilitators and Trainers (UK and Ireland)

Stream British Association of Sport Rehabilitators and Trainers (UK and Ireland) by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
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24

Cerebral palsy football

Stream Cerebral palsy football by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
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53

Prof Mario Maas on what sports clinicians need to know about radiology

Stream Prof Mario Maas on what sports clinicians need to know about radiology by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
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Looking back at building the evidence base for safe and active bicycling

Stream Looking back at building the evidence base for safe and active bicycling by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1n8q51t?1444774287
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144

Email Gone Astray

An email gone astray can provide fascinating insights for an unintended recipient. Written correspondence has undoubtedly fallen into the wrong hands since homo sapiens first put pigment on bark, but never before has it been so easy to have a personal message go awry. No longer is it a matter of surreptitiously steaming open sealed letters or snooping around in wastepaper baskets. Finding out another's personal business is now just a click away. Even more conveniently, candid opinions can sometimes make an unscheduled landing in your inbox, making for intriguing reading -- as I discovered. Some time ago, I'd sent out feelers regarding possible new GP jobs and had emailed a particular practice principal a couple of times, expressing interest. When it looked likely that I was going to pursue a different path, I sent a polite email explaining the situation and telling him I wouldn't be seeking an interview for a job at his practice at present. An email bounced back saying that my not wanting to work for him may be "a relief" as I "sounded a bit intense". It was sans salutation but, based on the rest of the content, was obviously intended for one of his work colleagues. It had no doubt been a simple error of his pressing 'reply' rather than 'forward'. I was chuffed: I've never been called "intense" before, at least, not to my knowledge. Perhaps there are several references to my intensity bouncing around cyberspace but this is the only one my inbox has ever captured. I've never considered myself an intense person. To me, the term conjured up the image of a passionate yet very serious type, often committed to worthy causes. Perhaps I had the definition wrong. I looked it up. The Oxford Dictionary gave me: "having or showing strong feelings or opinions; extremely earnest or serious". Unfortunately, I couldn't reconcile my almost pathologically Pollyanna-ish outlook, enthusiasm, irreverence and light-heartedness to this description -- nor my somewhat ambivalent approach to politics, religion, sport, the environment and other "serious" issues. At least the slip-up was minor. Several years ago, I unintentionally managed to proposition one of my young, shy GP registrars by way of a wayward text message. He had the same first name as my then-husband. Scrolling through my phone contacts late one night, alone in a hotel room at an interstate medical conference, I pressed one button too many. Hence this innocent fellow received not only declarations of love but a risqué suggestion to go with it. Not the usual information imparted from medical educator to registrar! It took me several days to realise my error, but despite my profuse apologies, the poor guy couldn't look me in the eye for the rest of the term. If I was "intense", I would conclude on a ponderous note -- with a moral message that would resonate with the intellectually elite. Alas, I'm a far less serious kind of girl and, as a result, the best I can up with is: Senders of emails and texts beware -- you are but one click away from being bitten on the bottom. (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor). Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work here.  
Dr Genevieve Yates
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 ybwd01?1444774304
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267

The NHS should care … for it's staff

The NHS is one of the largest employers in the world. It is one of the largest healthcare providers in the world and it is one of the most loved and needed institutions in this country. The downsides to the NHS is that it is constantly ‘in crisis’ and it is expected to provide better care and newer treatments with less money and not enough staff. Recently, this has caused a significant drop in staff morale and the beginnings of an exodus of trained staff out of the NHS. This needs to be addressed. If you read almost any management textbook, journal article or magazine, they will tell you that happy staff perform better. This ethos is easy to theorise but less easy to practice. Companies like Google and Apple have taken this to heart but so did some of the old Victorian companies like Cadbury’s and Roundtree. These companies aimed to make a profit but also to invest and look after their staff because of moral and economic principles… and it worked. I believe the NHS needs to embrace this old fashioned paternalistic concept, if it wishes to continue to be a world leader in excellent, affordable healthcare and professional training. If the NHS invests in its staff now, it will increase staff morale, encourage people to stay working in the NHS and ensure top quality patient care. The reforms Staff canteens open 24/7 (or near enough), that serve good quality, healthy and affordable food. If staff have to work unsociable shifts, it seems unfair not to provide them with the chance to eat a healthy meal at 2am rather than a Domino's. Staff canteens also allow the staff to unwind and socialise away from the wards and the public, they can be unofficial hubs of productivity where the 'real business' takes place away from the meetings. Staff rooms with free tea and coffee - it doesn't cost much and every appreciates a 'cuppa'. A** crèche** for the children of staff, on site or nearby. Reduces the stress of having to take children to carers and pick them up, allows greater flexibility for the staff. Free staff car parking (if they car share). Staff have to get to work and cars are the most practical way for most people, so why punish them by charging car parking? An onsite gym that is free/reduced price for staff and open 24/7 so that staff can pop in around their various shifts. The physio gym could just be expanded so patients and staff use the same facilities. Providing healthcare is stressful, takes long hours and is antisocial. All these factors make it easy to put on weight, especially with most hospitals only providing unhealthy meals, Costa and Gregs. So, an onsite gym would make it a lot more convenient for the staff to get the exercise they need to burn off all that stress and calories. Healthier, happier staff! A hospital/ centre social society like a student ‘MedSoc’ to organise staff socials and sports teams etc. This organisation could even organise special events for the staff like a summer ball or sports day. Anything fun that would bring the staff together and let them blow off steam. It could easily incorporate, elected officials from the professional bodies and elected representatives of the different employees and act as an unofficial staff voice. Regular staff forums that allow each group of employees to raise concerns or solutions to problems with the organisations management and senior staff. Staff rota’s should not just be imposed by management but should be organised in a flexible manner that allows staff input. The NHS management should encourage and provide extra learning opportunities for the staff. By investing in staff education they provide people with opportunities to develop them selves which will benefit the organisation and increase their sense of satisfaction with what they are doing. Team based points systems for good performance and regular rewards for excellent care. These points systems can then be used to promote competition between teams which should raise the level of care. Have a monthly leader board and reward the best team with a day at a spa or something. These changes may hark back to ideas that are out of favour now with the increased desires for measured ‘efficiency’, but I believe that these suggestions would hugely increase staff well being, which would hopefully improve their attitudes towards the organisation they work for and would hence make them happier and less stressed when they are caring for patients. If you have any other suggestions for improving staff wellbeing please do leave comments. The NHS is enormous and has a huge variety. It would be fascinating to survey as many parts of it as possible and see how many places have these services available for the staff already. Please feel free to contact me if you know of any study like this or if you are keen of setting up a study like this with me.  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
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Sep 11 Cardiology News

Ablating the left atrial appendage, the female athletic heart, pricy PCSK9 drugs, a sugar tax, and the potential of good nutrition are the topics discussed by Dr John Mandrola in this week's podcast.  
medscape.com
over 5 years ago