New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In
view moderators

Sport&Exercise

B7529db325b26dad1d7cbf7b580a6d45
13
961

How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
over 3 years ago
Preview
12
877

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) causes numbness and pain in the hands and arms. Certain sports and types of jobs can make it worse. Learn how CTS develops and w...  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago
Preview
10
386

The Respiratory System

Vivid animation and real-life examples demonstrate the respiration process, including the transfer of oxygen into the bloodstream and the effect of exercise on the respiratory system.  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview
8
121

Genetic epidemiology

1. Introductory lecture in genetic epidemiology for second year (pre-clinical) medical students. 2. Computer-aided learning exercises on genetics of common disease and their place in clinical practice  
Daniel Swerdlow
about 6 years ago
Preview
7
163

Full Respiratory Review Video - USMLE FAST TRACK - First Aid for USMLE Step 1 2013

http://usmlefasttrack.com/sign-up-usmle-step-1-review-program/ For A Limited Time The Full Respiratory Chapter Review Video from First Aid for USMLE Step 1 2...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
6
1215

Cardiac Stress Tests

A cardiac stress test may be ordered if your patient has or is suspected to have coronary artery disease. This test evaluates the heart’s response to stress or exercise.  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago
Preview
6
141

Hamstring injuries in sport - Fadi Hassan

S Hamstring injuries in sport Fadi Hassan Hull York Medical School  
Fadi Hassan
about 4 years ago
8c2ad6bfd238cdfe976e5064511ead14
8
425

I'm Not Your Typical SHO...

I'm an SHO, but I don't have your typical ward based job. In the last four years I have treated in jungles, underwater (in scuba gear), 5m from a gorilla, up a volcano, on a beach, at altitude, on safari, in a bog and on a boat. Expedition medicine is a great way to travel the world, take time out whist expanding your CV, and be physically and mentally challenged and develop your skill and knowledge base. As a doctor, you can undertake expeditions during your 'spare time' but it is more common for doctors to go on expeditions between F2 and specialty training. This is the ideal time either because you have been working for the last 7 years and either you need a break, the NHS has broken you, or you don't know what you want to do with your career and need time to think. At this point I would recommend using your F2 course/study budget on an Expedition Medicine course. They are expensive, but the knowledge and skill base you gain makes you more prepared and competitive for expedition jobs. There are many types of Expedition Medicine jobs ranging from endurance sports races to scientific expeditions. Although the jobs differ, there are many ailments common to all. You should expect to treat diarrhoea and vomiting, insect bites, blisters, cuts, injuries, and GP complaints such headaches and exacerbations of chronic illnesses. More serious injuries and illnesses can occur so it is good to be prepared as possible. To help, ensure your medical kit is labelled and organised e.g. labelled cannulation kit, emergency kit is always accessible and you are familiar with the casevac plan. Your role as an Expedition Medic involves more that the treatment of clients. A typical job also includes client selection and education, risk assessment, updating casevac plans, stock-checking kit, health promotion, project management and writing debriefs. What's Right For You? If you're keen to do Expedition Medicine, first think about where you want to go and then for how long. Think hard about these choices. A 6 month expedition through the jungle sounds exciting, but if you don't like spiders, creepy-crawlies and leaches, and the furthest you have travelled is an all-inclusive to Mallorca, then it might be best to start with a 4 week expedition in France. When you have an idea of what you want to do there are many organisations that you can apply to, including: Operation Wallacea Raleigh Across the Divide World Challenge Floating Doctors Doctors Without Borders Royal Geographical Society Action Challenge GapForce Each organisation will have different aims, clients, resources and responsibilities so pick one that suits you. Have fun and feel free to post any question below.  
Dr Rachel Saunders
over 4 years ago
Preview
6
76

Sports cardiology: Can ultraendurance events damage the heart?

Stream Sports cardiology: Can ultraendurance events damage the heart? by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
soundcloud.com
almost 2 years ago
Preview
4
29

Electrode placement for exercise ecg or ergospirometry according to IEC

In this movie we show you how to apply the electrodes for exercise ecg's or ergospirometry tests according to the latest guidelines of IEC. This ensures a go...  
youtube.com
12 months ago
App 1 137934322915539 7775
2
78

Exercise Physiology Basics

h4. Introduction To maintain a healthy lifestyle, the importance of physical activity can not be underestimated. It is the single most important endeavor that one can participate in to promote health throughout a lifetime. For decades, epidemiological research has accumulated highlighting the health benefits associated with regular physical activity. Furthermore, there is overwhelming research illustrating the morbid and mortal consequences of being sedentary. The benefits of a proper exercise regimen include: * Increase in the efficiency of cardiovascular and respiratory function * Reduction in coronary artery disease risk factors o Reduction in blood pressure o Increase in HDL and decreased triglycerides ...  
nursinglink.monster.com
over 1 year ago
Preview
3
18

Pharma industry welcomes fast-track medicine scheme

Drug makers support scheme but call for funding to support programme  
Telegraph.co.uk
over 3 years ago
Preview
2
53

Baby Milestones: Motor Development

https://www.einstein.yu.edu/cerc - Pediatrician Lisa Shulman shows the motor milestones expected in typically developing babies, from head control to walking...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
Preview
2
33

Exercises for a Healthy Back

Most people will have back pain at some time in their lives. These exercises will show how to stretch out some of the common pain causing muscles.  
youtube.com
about 1 year ago
Preview
0
38

Dr Mike Loosemore on ‘Exercise is Medicine’ – technology & behaviour change

Stream Dr Mike Loosemore on ‘Exercise is Medicine’ – technology & behaviour change by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 3 years ago
Preview
3
48

Exercise-associated hyponatremia in marathon runners: a two-year experience

This study was conducted to better define the pathophysiology, risk factors, and therapeutic approach to exercise-associated hyponatremia. Medical records from all participants in the 1998 Suzuki Rock ‘N’ Roll Marathon® who presented to 14 Emergency Departments (EDs) were retrospectively reviewed to identify risk factors for the development of hyponatremia. Hyponatremic patients were compared to other runners with regard to race time and to other marathon participants seen in the ED with regard to gender, clinical signs of dehydration, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). An original treatment algorithm incorporating the early use of hypertonic saline (HTS) was evaluated prospectively in our own ED for participants in the 1999 marathon to evaluate improvements in sodium correction rate and incidence of complications. A total of 26 patients from the 1998 and 1999 marathons were hyponatremic [serum sodium (SNa) ≤135 mEq/L] including 15 with severe hyponatremia (SNa ≤ 125 mEq/L). Three developed seizures and required intubation and admission to an intensive care unit. Hyponatremic patients were more likely to be female, use NSAIDS, and have slower finishing times. Hyponatremic runners reported drinking “as much as possible” during and after the race and were less likely to have clinical signs of dehydration. An inverse relationship between initial SNa and time of presentation was observed, with late presentation predicting lower SNa values. The use of HTS in selected 1999 patients resulted in faster SNa correction times and fewer complications than observed for 1998 patients. It is concluded that the development of exercise-associated hyponatremia is associated with excessive fluid consumption during and after extreme athletic events. Additional risk factors include female gender, slower race times, and NSAID use. The use of HTS in selected patients seems to be safe and efficacious.  
sciencedirect.com
almost 3 years ago
Preview
2
27

Benefits of Exercise for your Health

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimpli...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
Bryce 300x204
1
30

Running, Rhabdomyolosis, and Renal Failure – Who’s at Risk | Ultrarunning Magazine

if (!window.AdButler){(function(){var s = document.createElement("script"); s.async = true; s.type = "text/javascript";s.src = 'http://servedbyadbutler.com/app.js';var n = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; n.parentNode.insertBefore(s, n);}());} var AdButler = AdButler || {}; AdButler.ads = AdButler.ads || []; var abkw = window.abkw || ''; var plc187921 = window.plc187921 || 0; document.write('<'+'div id="placement_187921_'+plc187921+'"></'+'div>'); AdButler.ads.push({handler: function(opt){ AdButler.register(166749, 187921, [728,90], 'placement_187921_'+opt.place, opt); }, opt: { place: plc187921++, keywords: abkw, domain: 'servedbyadbutler.com' }});  
ultrarunning.com
over 2 years ago
Preview
0
28

Patellar dislocation in football, with Professor Philippe Neyret, France

Stream Patellar dislocation in football, with Professor Philippe Neyret, France by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
about 3 years ago
Preview
1
26

Running through an IV line in 5 min

The basics of running through an IV line  
YouTube
over 2 years ago