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62

Virtual Solutions to Real Problems: an Innovative Work Experience Support Programme

Poster presentation delivered at the AMEE 2009 Conference, focussing on work undertaken by St George’s committed to ensuring access to undergraduate healthcare courses is equitable. We recognise that the requirement for potential applicants to undertake and reflect on relevant work experience can be a barrier for under-represented groups. Such applicants are less likely to have social connections to support their preparation for application Building on our innovative use of e-learning technologies, we have developed a website for potential applicants offering essential information and guidance about finding and reflecting on work experience to support students’ preparation for application and interview Students from all backgrounds have access to information to support work experience and enhance their preparation for university application. The structured reflective tools include a journal template for download and online blogging, which were discussed during the session.  
Kirsty Wadsley
over 9 years ago
5
2
40

Dental Implants in the Smile Zone- Part 1

What every patient should know about <span style="font-weight: bold;">Dental Implants in the Smile Zone!</span>&nbsp; Dental implants are great solutions for teeth replacement, however whe performed in the smile zone, they require detailed planning, carefu techniques, and coordinated effort between the expert clinicians. In this <span style="font-weight: bold;">3-part series</span>, Dr. H. Ryan Kazemi discusses the <span style="font-weight: bold;">5 key principles</span> for achieving predictable succes with dental implants in the aesthetic zone. Also our guest expert, Dr Vincent Prestipino demonstrates these crucial principles by presentin two patients.  
H. Ryan Kazemi, Dmd
over 8 years ago
29956
1
12

CHEERY - The True Adventures of a Chiricahua Leopard Frog

Leopard Frogs are declining in number and facing extinction. Through Cheery, a friendly little Chiricahua Leopard Frog, author Dr. Elizabeth W. Davidson, a research scientist at Arizona State University, helps young readers grasp the problem and to understand the solutions. The book raises awareness in children, our planet’s future stewards.  
video admin
about 8 years ago
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37

Minister 'open-minded' on legal high solutions - BBC News

Crime minister Norman Baker says "all options" are being considered on the problem of legal highs, after the Home Office ruled out licensing of shops.  
BBC News
about 5 years ago
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15

Mobile Surgical

Mobile Health Solutions (MHS) has proven that sharing expensive medical resources enables better care to be delivered closer to the homes of rural New Zealanders.  
mobilesurgical.co.nz
about 5 years ago
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3
28

Leukemia treatment

There are three main solutions to treat leukemia. Chemotherapy is a collection of drugs which target cells that rapidly multiply (a key characteristic in can...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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20

IRS Tax Relief Attorney | Federal, Corporate & Property Tax Attorney

Enlisting the help of a Tax Relief Attorney is crucial when dealing with the complexities of US tax law and the IRS. Defense Tax Group assists taxpayers in finding tax relief solutions.  
Defense Tax Group
almost 5 years ago
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17

Tax Debt Help - IRS Tax Help - DefenseTax

Looking for tax debt help or, help with paying your irs tax debt? Get best tax help for fast solutions to all your tax problems, from professional lawyers at Defense Tax.  
Defense Tax Group
almost 5 years ago
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27

IRS Tax Relief - Back Taxes & Tax Relief Programs

Looking for irs tax relief? Defensetax provides irs tax relief solutions. Learn about federal tax relief, irs back taxes, installment agreement & offer in compromise.  
Defense Tax Group
almost 5 years ago
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Tax Debt Relief | IRS Tax Settlement - Defense Tax Group

IRS tax debt is overwhelming and can be financially devastating. We can help with a variety of tax debt relief solutions to greatly reduce, or even eliminate tax debt.  
Defense Tax Group
almost 5 years ago
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1
102

Talk Talk Customer Service Number 0844 800 3124

Speak with the Talk Talk customer service team by dialling 0844 800 3124 & get solutions for all your queries related to Talk Talk phone and broadband.  
Contact Telephone Numbers
almost 5 years ago
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18

Top 10 Things You Might Not Know About Water Storage Tanks

Top 10 Things You Might Not Know About Water Storage Tanks - Free download as Word Doc (.doc), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Great Basin Industrial (GBI) offers a full range of products and services for industrial tanks, vessels, refractory, towers and other steel plate structures. Great Basin Industrial works closely with company engineers and general contractors to provide turnkey solutions such as: design/engineering, fabrication, field erection, piping, refractory, painting, maintenance, repairs and alterations.We have a vast range of storage tanks available for hire and for sale, both new and used. No matter what you are looking for - bunded tanks, single skin tanks, plastic tanks, mild steel tanks - we are confident you will get the storage tank you need. Industrial Storage Tanks produces quality bolted tanks in stainless steel, galvanized steel and coated steel. Our team has produced and mounted over 1500 tanks for more than 300 clients in 54 countries.  
Scribd
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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Do the solutions for global health lie in healthcare?

Jocalyn Clark argues that the medicalisation of global health, like other aspects of human life and health, produces a narrow view of global health problems and will limit the success of solutions proposed to replace the millennium development goals  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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19

Women, antibiotics and the Longitude Prize | Athene Donald

Times have changed since the first Longitude Prize and women now form an important part of the scientific workforce. Can the resultant diversity help to find creative solutions to this challenge prize?  
the Guardian
over 4 years ago
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16

Concerns over use of hydroxyethyl starch solutions

Large trials have shown that hydroxyethyl starch increases the risk of death, kidney injury, and bleeding. However, an EMA review last year permitted continued use in some patients, overturning an earlier decision to withdraw the product completely. Christiane Hartog and colleagues discuss the evidence and call on doctors to avoid using starch formulations  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Politics - failing to find solutions to our changing lives | Sonia Sodha

Sonia Sodha: Amazing scientific progress sees jobs changing, people living longer… Society needs to adjust its thinking  
the Guardian
over 4 years ago
1
0
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Mobile Health integrated in future healthcare systems.

Hello Community, I have been wondering how new technologies in mobile health can revolutionize our european healthcare systems and what incentives governments and large organizations need to drive mobile health technology solutions to make a difference. I also had the pleasure to be CEO of a mobile health technology startup called Comoray AB, over the past year, in Sweden. Now, in the process to start something new (possibly in the field of mobile driven Electronic Medical Record / Electronic Health Record systems). I would like to get some feedback from communities and student how YOU consider the current healthcare system changing.  
Ben Heubl
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 15yjjlc?1444773920
8
119

Technology – The saviour of the NHS?

Does the NHS really need saving? Your first question may be ‘does the NHS really need saving?’, and I would have to answer with an emphatic ‘Yes’. April this year sees the official start of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), the key component of The Health and Social Care Act, one of the biggest changes the NHS has seen. Amongst other things these organisations are tasked with saving the NHS £20 billion in the next 3 years by means of ‘efficiency changes’, despite the Institute of Fiscal Studies saying that the NHS needs to be spending £20 billion more each year by 2020. A daunting task but even more so in the light of the recently published Francis Report, where failings at Stafford Hospital have highlighted the need for compassionate patient care to be at the centre of all decisions. All of this has to be achieved in the largest publically funded health service in the world, which employs 1.7 million staff and serves more than 62 million people, with an annual budget of £106 billion (2011/12). So is it the solution? Clearly technology cannot be the only solution to this problem but I believe technology is pivotal in achieving the ‘efficiency changes’ desired. This might be direct use of technology to improve efficiency or may indirectly provide the intelligence that can drive non-technology based efficiencies; and if technology can be used to save clinicians time this can be reinvested into improving patient care. The NHS already has or is working on a number of national scale IT projects that could bring efficiency savings such as choose and book, electronic prescription service and map of medicine to name but a few. Newer and more localised projects include telehealth, clinical decision tools, remote working, the use of social media and real time patient data analysis. Yet many of these ideas, though new to the NHS, have been employed in business for many years. The NHS needs to catch up and then to further innovate. We need clinicians, managers and IT developers to work together if we are to be successful. Such change is not without its challenges and the size and complexity of the NHS makes implementation of change difficult. Patient safety and confidentiality has to be paramount but these create practical and technical barriers to development. I have just completed Connecting for Health’s Clinical Safety Training and there are some formidable hurdles to development and implementation of new IT systems in the NHS (ISB0129 and ISB0160). Procurement in the NHS is a beast of its own that I wouldn’t claim to understand but the processes are complex potentially making it difficult for small developers. The necessity of financial savings means the best solutions are not always chosen, even though that can be false economy in the long run. Yet we must not let these barriers stop us from seeking to employ technology for the good of clinicians and patients. We must not let them stifle innovation or be frustrated by what can be a slow process at times. The NHS recognises some of these issues and is working to try to help small businesses negotiate these obstacles. I hope in a series of posts in coming months to look in more detail at some of the technologies currently being used in the NHS, as well as emerging projects, and the opportunities and problems that surround them. I may stray occasionally into statistics or politics if you can cope with that! I am a practicing clinician with fingers in many pies so the frequency of my postings is likely to be inversely proportional to the workload I face! Comments are always welcome but I may not always reply in a timely manner.  
Dr Damian Williams
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1bg7u2d?1444773924
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1 Billion users - Well done! But there are still bigger fish to fry.

I would like to say "well done, Mark Zuckerberg" as Facebook tops 1 billion active users! But all this is while 1 billion people in the world never see a health worker in their entire lives. The internet is the most powerful tool of our generation and there is no doubt that its influence will increase further in the future. I think we can all recognise the success of an enterprise such as Facebook and it is certainly a commendable feat to bring 1 billion people closer together on a regular basis. Well done Mark Zuckerberg! But does this not highlight some bigger questions? When will we see the internet making a real difference? I don't mean to belittle any enterprise such as Facebook which excites and energises a huge community, but when will we see a movement that has such an impact to save and improve billions of lives every month? The WHO Global Health Workforce Alliance estimates that there are a billion people alive today who will never see a health worker in their lives... Ever! We are not short of the tools to change this. So, how will this movement come about? Will it be a political push? Will it be an established company that walks in the 'right' direction? Or could it come from the grassroots? I believe this is one of the greatest challenges of our generation, and the most exciting challenge I can think of. As a doctor and co-founder of Meducation, we have started a movement in the right direction. Meducation aims to unite the medical community - yes all of it, but we know our limits. You can not make such an impact in one step. Most of the charitable solutions and philanthropic activity takes us huge leaps in the right direction and these are of significant importance, but will we ever see the sort of impact possible if we can't maintain the ability to push forwards with the attrition needed to effectively get this right. I would assume that most of those who have set up an innovative and successful solution to a problem would say that they could not achieve this with an element of freedom to experiment, try different methods and approaches before finding the formula that works. Is it not the same with this problem? The solution is going to grow from the grassroots and for us at Meducation, although we are starting with health workers in the UK, we certainly see the hopeful future where the health workers in the developing countries can gain access to the educational material and support they need from the rest of the community. With the global medical community working closely together, we will be better placed to help the 1 billion people who would have never see a health worker in their lives. So well done Mark.... but there are still bigger fish to fry.  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 2njk5o?1444774020
4
1267

LWW: Case Of The Month - April 2013

This month’s case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e, with 15% off using the discount code: MEDUCATION. The case below is followed by a quiz question, allowing you a choice of diagnoses. Select the one letter section that best describes the patient’s condition. The Case A 28-year old woman has an unremarkable pregnancy through her first 28 weeks of gestation, with normal weight gain and no serious complications. She has no previous history of diabetes, hypertension of other systemic disease before or during her current pregnancy. During her 30-week checkup, her blood pressure measures 128/85, and she complains about feeling slightly more “bloated” than usual with swelling in her legs that seems to get more uncomfortable as the day goes on. Her obsterician recommends that she get more bed rest, stay off her feet as much as possible and return for evaluation in one week. At the one-week follow-up, the patient presents with noticable”puffiness” in her face, and a blood pressure of 145/95. She complains she has been developing headaches, sporadic blurred vision, right-sided discomfort and some shortness of breath. She has gained more than 10 lb (4.5kg) in the past week. A urinalysis on the patient revelas no glucose but a 3+ reading for protein. Her obstetrician decides to admit her immediately to a local tertiary care hospital for further evaluation. Over the next 24 hours, the patient’s urine output is recorded as 500mL and contains 6.8 grams of protein. Her plasma albumin level is 3.1 g/dl, hemacrit 48%, indirect bilirubin 1.5mg/dl and blood platelets=77000/uL, respectively. Her blood pressure is now 190/100. It is decided to try to deliver the foetus. The expelled placenta is small and shows signs of widespread ischmic damage. Within a week of delivery, the mother’s blood pressure returns to normal, and her oedema subsides. One month later, the mother shows no ill effects of thos later-term syndrome. Question What is the clinical diagnosis of this patient’s condition and its underlying pathophysiology? A. Gestational Hypertension B. Preeclampsia C. Gestational Diabetes D. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava Answer The correct answer is "B. Preeclampsia". The patient’s symptoms and laboratory findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Preeclampsia, which is a condition occurring in some pregnancies that causes life-threatening organ and whole body regulatory malfunctions. The patient’s negative urine glucose is inconsistent with gestational diabetes. Gestational hypertension or vena caval compression cannot explain all of the patient findings. The patient has three major abnormal findings- generalised oedema, hypertension and proteinuria which are all common in preeclampsia. Although sequalae of a normal pregnancy can include water and salt retention, bloating, modest hypertension and leg swelling (secondary to capillary fluid loss from increased lower limb capillary hydrostatic pressure due to compression of the inferior vena cava by the growing foetus/uterus), oedema in the head and upper extremities, a rapid 10 pound weight gain and shortness of breath suggests a generalized and serious oedematous state. The patient did not have hypertension before or within 20 weeks gestation (primary hypertension) and did not develop hypertension after the 20th week of pregnancy with no other abnormal findings (gestational hypertension). Hypertension with proteinuria occurring beyond the 20th week of pregnancy however is a hallmark of preeclampsia. In addition, the patient has hemolysis (elevated bilirubin and LDH levels), elevated liver enzyme levels and thrombocytopenia. This is called the HELLP syndrome (HELLP = Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets.), and is considered evidence of serious patient deterioration in preeclampsia. A urine output of 500 ml in 24 hours is 1/2 to 1/4 of normal output in a hydrated female and indicates renal insufficiency. Protein should never be found in the urine and indicates loss of capillaries integrity in glomeruli which normally are not permeable to proteins. The patient has substantial 24 urine protein loss and hypoalbuminemia. However, generally plasma albumin levels must drop below 2.5 gm/dl to decrease plasma oncotic pressure enough to cause general oedema. The patient’s total urinary protein loss was insufficient in this regard. Capillary hyperpermeability occurs with preeclampsia and, along with hypertension, could facilitate capillary water efflux and generalized oedema. However myogenic constriction of pre-capillary arterioles could reduce the effect of high blood pressure on capillary water efflux. An early increase in hematocrit in this patient suggests hemoconcentration which could be caused by capillary fluid loss but the patient’s value of 48 is unremarkable and of little diagnostic value because increased hematocrit occurs in both preeclampsia and normal pregnancy. PGI2, PGE2 and NO, produced during normal pregnancy, cause vasorelaxation and luminal expansion of uterine arteries, which supports placental blood flow and development. Current theory suggests that over production of endothelin, thromboxane and oxygen radicals in preeclampsia antagonize vasorelaxation while stimulating platelet aggregation, microthrombi formation and endothelial destruction. These could cause oedema, hypertension, renal/hepatic deterioration and placental ischemia with release of vasotoxic factors. The patient’s right-sided pain is consistent with liver pathology (secondary to hepatic DIC or oedematous distention). Severe hypertension in preeclampsia can lead to maternal end organ damage, stroke, and death. Oedematous distension of the liver can cause hepatic rupture and internal hemorrhagic shock. Having this patient carry the baby to term markedly risks the life of the mother and is not considered current acceptable clinical practice. Delivery of the foetus and termination of the pregnancy is the only certain way to end preeclampsia. Read more This case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at (lww.co.uk)[http://lww.co.uk] when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! About LWW/ Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams and Wilkins (LWW) is a leading publisher of high-quality content for students and practitioners in medical and related fields. Their text and review products, eBooks, mobile apps and online solutions support students, educators, and instiutions throughout the professional’s career. LWW are proud to partner with Meducation.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
about 6 years ago