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41
1718

SEPSIS: Emergency LECTURE made simple in HD!

Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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13
1313

Septic shock - pathophysiology and symptoms

Learn about the pathophysiology of Sepsis and Septic Shock and the symptoms you need to look out for.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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9
703

Sepsis: Diagnosis and Management

Based on surviving sepsis campaign and sepsis kills programme.  
speakerdeck.com
over 4 years ago
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6
145

Problems of the neonate and young infant - Pocket Book of Hospital Care for Children - NCBI Bookshelf

This chapter provides guidance on essential newborn care and the management of problems in neonates and young infants, from birth to 2 months of age. It includes neonatal resuscitation, the recognition and management of neonatal sepsis and other bacterial infections, and the management of preterm and low-birth-weight infants. A table giving the doses of commonly used drugs for neonates and young infants is included at the end of this chapter, which also lists the dosages for low-birth-weight and premature infants.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
over 4 years ago
4
5
91

Sepsis - Part 1

<div class="postBody">Sepsis is a common cause of death in the intensive care unit.&nbsp; In this episode I present some of the statistics on septic deaths, introduce the definitions, and present the basic science.&nbsp; Part 2 will cover fluid and drug therapy for septic shock.&nbsp; </div>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
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5
277

Understanding lactate in sepsis & Using it to our advantage

Introduction with a case 0 Once upon a time a 60-year-old man was transferred from the oncology ward to the ICU for treatment of neutropenic septic shock.   
emcrit.org
over 3 years ago
3
4
63

Sepsis - Part 2

In this episode we discuss that ICU care of the patient with sepsis.&nbsp; This includes an introduction to various vasopressors.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
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4
403

Early Goal Directed Therapy in Sepsis

This video was created to help medical students (and anyone else) solidify their knowledge in Emergency Medicine.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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4
11

Incidence and Outcomes in Acute Kidney Injury: A Comprehensive Population-Based Study

Epidemiological studies of acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute-on-chronic renal failure (ACRF) are surprisingly sparse and confounded by differences in definition. Reported incidences vary, with few studies being population-based. Given this and our aging population, the incidence of AKI may be much higher than currently thought. We tested the hypothesis that the incidence is higher by including all patients with AKI (in a geographical population base of 523,390) regardless of whether they required renal replacement therapy irrespective of the hospital setting in which they were treated. We also tested the hypothesis that the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-Stage Kidney (RIFLE) classification predicts outcomes. We identified all patients with serum creatinine concentrations ≥150 μmol/L (male) or ≥130μmol/L (female) over a 6-mo period in 2003. Clinical outcomes were obtained from each patient's case records. The incidences of AKI and ACRF were 1811 and 336 per million population, respectively. Median age was 76 yr for AKI and 80.5 yr for ACRF. Sepsis was a precipitating factor in 47% of patients. The RIFLE classification was useful for predicting full recovery of renal function (P < 0.001), renal replacement therapy requirement (P < 0.001), length of hospital stay [excluding those who died during admission (P < 0.001)], and in-hospital mortality (P = 0.035). RIFLE did not predict mortality at 90 d or 6 mo. Thus the incidence of AKI is much higher than previously thought, with implications for service planning and providing information to colleagues about methods to prevent deterioration of renal function. The RIFLE classification is useful for identifying patients at greatest risk of adverse short-term outcomes.  
jasn.asnjournals.org
about 4 years ago
8
3
131

Altered Level of Consciousness

<p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">This episode covers an approach to children with altered level of consciousness. &nbsp;We present an approach to the initial management in these cases, with a focus on the ABC and DFG approach. Investigations and imaging are discussed. Some specific causes of altered LOC are covered. &nbsp;This episode was written by Peter MacPherson and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and Stollery Children's Hospital. She is also the Clerkship Director.&nbsp;</span></p <p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">~~~</span></p <p><!--StartFragment--></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Times;"><span style="font-size: small;"> <!--StartFragment--> </span></span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Differential Diagnosis of Altered Level of Consciousness:</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">1) Structural causes: cerebrovascular accident, cerebral vein thrombosis, hydrocephalus, intracerebral tumor, subdural empyema, trauma (intracranial hemorrhage, diffuse cerebral swelling, abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome)</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">2) Medical causes: anoxia, diabetic ketoacidosis, electrolyte abnormality, encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, infection (sepsis), inborn errors of metabolism, intussusception, meningitis or encephalitis, psychogenic, postictal state, toxins, uremia (hemolytic-uremic syndrome)</span></p <div style="border: none; border-bottom: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;" <p class="MsoNormal" style="border: none; mso-border-bottom-alt: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Adapted from: Avner J (2006) Altered states of consciousness. <em>Pediatr Rev</em></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> 27: 331-338.</span></p </div <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 9 years ago
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3
29

Gram-positive Toxic Shock Syndromes

Review article  
Andrew Ferguson
over 8 years ago
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3
155

Sepsis and SIRS

Definitions. Before discussing SIRS along with the various sepsis syndromes, it is important to understand some basic definitions. Infection: This is the inflammatory response initiated by the presence of a micro-organisms in normally sterile tissue. Bacteraemia: The presence of live bacteria in the blood stream. This can occur in a healthy individual and present with no symptoms. Common causes include surgery, dental procedures and even tooth brushing.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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2
38

Clinical Cases and Images: ClinicalCases.org: Prerenal Acute Renal Failure due to Volume Depletion

This is a good practical case and very useful for new clinicians. For any clinician:No foley catheter unless oliguric, anuric, obstructed since any catheter is a foreign body and increases infection risk.Rehydrate if U/A has high spec gavity, mucous membranes dry, or if BUN is >30 times the creatinine as in this case. Even CHF pts get dry if not in heart failure. If in doubt, do CXR, BNPT, listen for crackles.Start with 250cc IVF if BNPT not less than 150 or give carefully while checking lung bases posteriorly after each bolus along with pulse ox, etc as above. Half of pts in acute renal failure are septic. Look for and eliminate source such as pneumonia, foreign body, pyelonephritis, joint infections. May be afebrile/ low temp or low WBCs with sepsis. Do cultures, check lactate ASAP to detect sepsis BEFORE the BP drops. Lactic acid "the troponin of sepsis." If septic, give a lot of fluids (up to 10 liters often) since capillary leak syndrome will lead to severe hypotension. If septic expect edema to develop with IV boluses yet be aware pt is intravascularly depleted. No pressors without fluids "pressors are not your friend" as per lecturers on Surviving Sepsis campaign.  
clinicalcases.org
about 4 years ago
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2
43

Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes: Diagnosis and Management - American Family Physician

Preterm premature rupture of membranes is the rupture of membranes during pregnancy before 37 weeks' gestation. It occurs in 3 percent of pregnancies and is the cause of approximately one third of preterm deliveries. It can lead to significant perinatal morbidity, including respiratory distress syndrome, neonatal sepsis, umbilical cord prolapse, placental abruption, and fetal death. Appropriate evaluation and management are important for improving neonatal outcomes. Speculum examination to determine cervical dilation is preferred because digital examination is associated with a decreased latent period and with the potential for adverse sequelae. Treatment varies depending on gestational age and includes consideration of delivery when rupture of membranes occurs at or after 34 weeks' gestation. Corticosteroids can reduce many neonatal complications, particularly intraventricular hemorrhage and respiratory distress syndrome, and antibiotics are effective for increasing the latency period.  
aafp.org
almost 4 years ago
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2
199

Inhalational Anaesthetics

All Anaesthetics Analgesia Anatomy Conditions Emergency Medicine ICU Immunology Intubation Pharmacology Physics Physiology Renal Sepsis Techniques Vaccine #WDSD16  
propofology.com
over 3 years ago
12
1
74

Focus On: Ultrasound-Guided Lumbar Puncture

In the emergency department, lumbar punctures are most commonly performed to determine the presence of an infectious process (meningitis, encephalitis, sepsis, etc.) or subarachnoid hemorrhage  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
about 9 years ago
8
1
31

Meta-analysis of Glucose Control

Tight glucose control has been widely introduced into critical care This meta-analysis, recently published in JAMA, critically evaluate the effects of these trials in reduction of sepsis as well a mortality. The results might surprise you.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
5
1
18

Surviving Sepsis Campaign (part 2)

We continue our discussion of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC).&nbsp; This includes fluids types, steroids, rhAPC (Xigris), and blood sugar control.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
13
1
28

Do Steroid Improve Survivial in Sepsis? CORTICUS Trial

The results of the CORTICUS trial are discussed.&nbsp;  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
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1
26

Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

Review article  
Andrew Ferguson
over 8 years ago