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12
2
128

Bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis in paediatrics  
Mr Raymond Buick
over 10 years ago
13
9
111

Croup and epiglottitis

Tutorial on croup (laryngo tracheo bronchitis) and epiglottitis.  
Mr Raymond Buick
over 10 years ago
0
19
315

Cystic fibrosis

This podcast tutorial on cystic fibrosis gives an overview of the disease including presentation and diagnosis.  
Mr Raymond Buick
over 10 years ago
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7
206

Interstitial and restrictive lung diseases

A synopsis of common interstitial lung diseases  
James Harper
about 10 years ago
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13
285

Vagus nerve

An edited version of my Friday Evening Discouse given to the Royal Institution on 11 April 2008. Abstract: The vagus nerves (cranial nerve X) connects our brainstem to the body, facilitating monitoring and control of many automatic functions; the vagus electrically links our gut, lungs and heart to the base of the brain in an evolutionarily-ancient circuit, similar between mammals and also seen in birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The vagus comprises a major part of the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system, contributing to the motor control of important physiological functions such as heart rate and gut motility. The vagus is also sensory, relaying protective visceral information leading to reflexes like cough and indication of lung volume. The vagus has been described as a neural component of the immune reflex. By monitoring changes in the level of control exerted by the vagus, apparent as beat by beat changes of heart rate, it is possible to indirectly view the effect of pharmaceuticals and disease on brainstem function and neural processes underlying consciousness. The paired vagus nerves of humans have different functions, and stimulation of the left vagus has been shown to be a therapeutic treatment for epilepsy, and may modulate the perception of pain.  
Chris Pomfrett
about 10 years ago
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11
264

Lung cancer diagnosis

This slideshow gives a good summary of the diagnosis of lung cancer.  
Sarah Goodall
about 10 years ago
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18
206

Respiratory examination

Video produced by St Georges University outlining the respiratory examination.  
Dr Alastair Buick
about 9 years ago
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12
833

Pleural effusion x-ray (left-sided)

This PA Chest X-Ray demonstrates a left sided pleural effusion. In this condition fluid collects between the parietal and visceral pleura and appears as a shadowy fluid level on the X-Ray with obliteration of the costophrenic angles. If you were to examine this patient they might be in respiratory distress from reduced oxygen uptake (so have low sats, high resp rate, possible cyanosis and accessory muscle useage) - they may have reduced chest expansion on the affected side and it would be stony dull to percussion. Fluid transmits sound poorly so breath sounds would be decreased as would vocal resonance/fremitus. Someone with consolidation may have very similar clinical findings but the underlying area of lung is almost solid due to pus from the infective process - as sounds travel well through solids they would have increased vocal fremitus which is how you can clinically differentiate between the two conditions. Clinical examination and understanding of conditions is paramount to practice effective medicine. Before you recieved this X-Ray you should be able to diagnose the condition and use the X-Ray to confirm your suspicions.  
Rhys Clement
about 9 years ago
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338

CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
about 9 years ago
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104

Chest x-Ray

Left Sided Pleural effusion. The most common cause of this presentation is malignancy. It is important to consider the source of a possible primary. It may also be necessary to obtain a sample of the effusion fluid to determine whether it is a transudate or an exudate, using Light's criteria as a guide. Exudate contains greater levels of protein than a transudate reflecting it's often inflammatory origin as the blood vessels become 'leaky' to protein molecules. The differential diagnosis for bilateral pleural effusions is different again. Consider 'failure' e.g. heart, renal or hepatic.  
Tim Ritzmann
about 9 years ago
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342

DVT and pulmonary embolisms

This 3D medical animation shows a blood clot forming in a lower leg vein, creating a deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. When the thrombus breaks free of the valve, it is called an embolus, and travels toward the heart and lungs. The animation ends by showing the embolus lodging in the lung tissue forming a life-threatening pulmonary embolism (PE).  
Liz Walker
over 8 years ago
10
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36

Focus On: Treatment of Epistaxis

Epistaxis is one of the most common ear, nose, and throat emergencies, with an estimated 60% lifetime incidence rate for an individual person.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
0
2
15

Focus On: Ultrasound Detection of Traumatic Anterior Pneumothorax

Early detection of a pneumothorax may be important in the clinical management of a trauma patient. Supine chest radiographs in the immobilized trauma patient have been shown to be insensitive.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
1
1
22

Focus On: Acute Chest Syndrome - The Critical Cough

Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is defined as any acute cardiopulmonary symptom accompanied by a new radiographic infiltrate in a patient with sickle cell disease.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
5
2
22

Focus On: Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

With approximately 600,000 cases and 50,000 deaths per year, this condition challenges emergency physicians to be diligent in their patient evaluation and knowledgeable in their interpretation of nonspecific tests.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
7
2
34

Focus On: Treatment Options for Pneumothorax

Define the various types of pneumothoraces. Describe the indications for needle aspiration and small-bore catheter placement in the management of pneumothoraces as outlined by the ACCP and BTS. Discuss the controversies surrounding needle aspiration and small-bore catheter placement for management of pneumothoraces. Identify the characteristics of those patients with pneumothoraces unlikely to be successfully treated with needle aspiration and small-bore catheter placement. Identify sub-sets of patients who have had their pneumothoraces successfully treated with needle aspiration and small-bore catheter placement.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
1
1
14

Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

A discussion on nosocomial infections and VAP.<br/>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago
9
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34

Complications of PEEP and Auto-PEEP

Virtually all patients on ventilators are on PEEP.&nbsp; PEEP has several interactions with various organ systems and some can result in profound complications. An understanding of PEEP and auto-PEEP are required before we can understand modes of ventilation like APRV (Bi-Vent)  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago
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Modes of Mechanical Ventilation

A discussion of the various types of ventilators with a focus on the various ventilator modes and types of ventilator cycles.&nbsp; Also presented is the topic of pressure support ventilation (PSV)  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago