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PharmaceuticalPreparations

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Pain management - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pain management, pain medicine, pain control or algiatry, is a branch of medicine employing an interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those living with chronic pain[1] The typical pain management team includes medical practitioners, pharmacists, clinical psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurse specialists.[2] The team may also include other mental health specialists and massage therapists. Pain sometimes resolves promptly once the underlying trauma or pathology has healed, and is treated by one practitioner, with drugs such as analgesics and (occasionally) anxiolytics. Effective management of chronic (long-term) pain, however, frequently requires the coordinated efforts of the management team.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 2 years ago
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List of psychiatric medications by condition treated - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of psychiatric medications used by psychiatrists to treat mental illness or distress. It is ordered alphabetically according to the condition or conditions each drug is used to treat, then by the generic name of each drug. The list is not exhaustive and not all drugs are used regularly in all countries.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 2 years ago
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White Families Call for a Gentler War on Drugs

In what is now being called as the worst drug overdose epidemic in United States history, the dark shroud of drug addiction ills over a new terrain.  
recoveryrehabs.com
over 2 years ago
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Largest Global Survey: Where Are Cancer Drugs Affordable?

Cancer drug prices vary widely around the world, but despite overall lower price tags, drugs might be less affordable in low-income countries.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
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Two Expensive Diabetic Macular Edema Drugs Not Cost-effective

Anti-VEGF medicines aflibercept and ranibizumab would have to drop in price by 69% and 80%, respectively, to be worth the societal cost compared with bevacizumab, a new study has found.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
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Mandatory addiction treatment for people who use drugs: global health and human rights analysis

Global evidence indicates that mandated treatment of drug dependence conflicts with drug users’ human rights and is not effective in treating addiction. Karsten Lunze and colleagues argue that drug treatment policies must be evidence based and meet international standards  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Mandatory addiction treatment for people who use drugs: global health and human rights analysis

Global evidence indicates that mandated treatment of drug dependence conflicts with drug users’ human rights and is not effective in treating addiction. Karsten Lunze and colleagues argue that drug treatment policies must be evidence based and meet international standards  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Higher priced drugs are not cost effective for diabetic macular edema, US study finds

In comparsion with treatment with the low cost antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drug bevacizumab (Avastin), the more expensive alternatives aflibercept (Eylea) and ranibizumab (Lucentis) are not cost effective for diabetic macular edema, a new study has found.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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'There's no point giving free cancer drugs to Africa' - BBC News

In an interview with the BBC News website, AstraZeneca boss Pascal Soriot talks about how it is an exciting time for the cancer drugs world, but says there is no point giving free drugs to Africa.  
bbc.co.uk
over 2 years ago
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Seven days in medicine: 1-7 June 2016

New guidance from NHS England and the Royal College of General Practitioners is urging GPs to review prescriptions for patients with learning disabilities or autism and to make sure that psychotropic drugs are continued only when the person poses a severe risk to themselves or others and all other alternatives have been exhausted. A review published last year found that between 30 000 and 35 000 people in the United Kingdom with learning disabilities or autism were taking an antidepressant or an antipsychotic despite not having the conditions for which the drugs are indicated. (See full BMJ story doi:10.1136/bmj.i3137)  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Seven days in medicine: 1-7 June 2016

New guidance from NHS England and the Royal College of General Practitioners is urging GPs to review prescriptions for patients with learning disabilities or autism and to make sure that psychotropic drugs are continued only when the person poses a severe risk to themselves or others and all other alternatives have been exhausted. A review published last year found that between 30 000 and 35 000 people in the United Kingdom with learning disabilities or autism were taking an antidepressant or an antipsychotic despite not having the conditions for which the drugs are indicated. (See full BMJ story doi:10.1136/bmj.i3137)  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Authors’ reply to Tufan and colleagues and Boucaud-Maitre

In response to Tufan and colleagues, it is true that older frail patients are under-represented in our meta-analysis, but such patients are under-represented in clinical trials in general, not just those investigating type 2 diabetes.1 2 Even when there is no formal age limit, the common exclusion of patients with organ dysfunction and comorbidities means that most older people are excluded.3 We can but hope that further trials will provide more information on benefits and risks of drugs in older people and will update …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Doctors' Prescribing Behavior a Small Part of Drug Cost Mess

Changing the CMS formula for reimbursing physicians for costs of drugs may have a small effect, but the fundamental problem comes from the price set by manufacturers, the author writes.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
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Extra five years of aromatase inhibitors increases disease-free survival in breast cancer

Extending use of adjuvant aromatase inhibitors from five to 10 years in women treated for primary breast cancer significantly increases rates of disease-free survival and the risk of cancer occurring in the other breast, a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows.1 However, extended use of the drugs was not found to affect overall survival.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Breast cancer: Taking hormonal drugs for up to 15 years can reduce risk - study - BBC News

Taking hormonal drugs for up to 15 years reduces the risk of breast cancers coming back, a landmark study suggests.  
bbc.co.uk
over 2 years ago
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FDA Simplifies Compassionate Use Application and Drug Costs

The new form should take physicians far less time to fill out, the agency says. The FDA also issues guidance on costs for the drugs.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
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'New era' of personalised cancer drugs, say doctors - BBC News

Cancer is entering a "new era" of personalised medicine with drugs targeted to the specific weaknesses in each patient's tumour, say doctors.  
bbc.co.uk
over 2 years ago
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A pregnant woman with anaemia and thrombocytopenia

A 28 year old woman who was 31 weeks pregnant attended the emergency department of our hospital with acute onset of abdominal pain in her right upper quadrant. She had undergone regular antenatal check-ups in the midwifery clinic, with no problems reported. She had no medical history of note and was not taking any drugs. She was a non-smoker and before she was pregnant she rarely drank alcohol. Her cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological examinations were unremarkable and she had no peripheral oedema. The fetal heart sounds were normal. Her blood pressure was high (136/104 mm Hg) and her pulse was 88 beats/min. The urine protein to creatinine ratio showed no evidence of proteinuria.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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A pregnant woman with anaemia and thrombocytopenia

A 28 year old woman who was 31 weeks pregnant attended the emergency department of our hospital with acute onset of abdominal pain in her right upper quadrant. She had undergone regular antenatal check-ups in the midwifery clinic, with no problems reported. She had no medical history of note and was not taking any drugs. She was a non-smoker and before she was pregnant she rarely drank alcohol. Her cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological examinations were unremarkable and she had no peripheral oedema. The fetal heart sounds were normal. Her blood pressure was high (136/104 mm Hg) and her pulse was 88 beats/min. The urine protein to creatinine ratio showed no evidence of proteinuria.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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'Major win' in pancreatic cancer fight - BBC News

A new combination of chemotherapy drugs should become the main therapy for pancreatic cancer, say UK researchers.  
bbc.co.uk
over 2 years ago