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Foo20151013 2023 113s0nw?1444773969
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The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!? These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality. Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend: Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent. While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier. Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Sherwood – From cells to systems Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it. For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts. However: I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards! Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did. That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you. Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs. This is a book for any budding surgeon! Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder Macleod’s clinical examination Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf. I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice. Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder Oxford textbook of clinical pathology When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all. The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology. After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide. Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Medical Pharmacology at glance Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day. Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function. This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts! In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece! Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder. Anatomy colouring book This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all. While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery. Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it! Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!  
Benjamin Norton
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1i9rgu8?1444773940
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The elephant in the room: Is everything you see on an x-ray relevant?

Recent 'tongue in cheek' research which has been reported in a Washington Post blog recently has caused a lot of questions to be raised concerning inattention blindness, which could cause concern unless you understand the underlying psychology. Here's a CT scan: During psychology lectures at Med School, you may have encountered the basketball bouncing students in front of a bank of elevators where you were asked to count the number of passes the basketball made from the player wearing the white T shirt, while a gorilla ran between the students. (Even if you did watch it before, you can re-watch the video on the Washington Post blog). The recent study asked radiologists to identify and count how many nodules are present in the lungs on a regular CT thorax. If you look at the image you may see a gorilla waving his arms about. As a radiologist, I see the anatomy in the background, the chambers of the heart and mediastinum, but nothing there out of the ordinary. As radiologists, we are looking for pathology, but also report pathological findings that are unexpected. The clinical history of a patient is very important for us in interpretation of imaging examinations, as we need to answer the question you are asking, but have to be careful we do not miss anything else of serious import. As we do not see any other pathology, we would not expect to find a gorilla in the chest, so our brains can pass over distracting findings. The other psychological issue is the satisfaction of search, where we can see the expected pathology, but may miss the other cancer if we do not carefully and systematically look through the images. So the main thing to learn from this is that your training should always keep you alert, not just to expected happening, but to not discount the unexpected, then many lives will be saved as a result of your attention to detail.  
Chris Flowers
almost 8 years ago
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8
164

Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity

Metabolic syndrome and obesity are attaining epidemic proportions worldwide. This PPT shows the link between the two, their aetiology, the pathophysiology and what simple measures could be used in managing the conditions.  
piyusha atapattu
about 8 years ago
2
0
30

What are liver ultrasounds NOT good at detecting?

Often when liver pathology is suggested, the imaging of choice seems to be ultrasound. What conditions would not be picked up on ultrasound that would be picked up on other imaging?  
Jess Pobbs
about 8 years ago
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3
51

Wales Medical Undergraduate Conference Case Presentation - A Dangerous Cough

A case report surrounding a “A dangerous cough” which highlights the importance of healthcare advertising and describes how a fairly innocent presentation can later turn out to be a more sinister pathology.  
ABHISHEK CHITNIS
about 8 years ago
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3
70

childhood asthma

slide presentation of childhood asthma, covering about epidemiology, pathology, presentation, investigation and management and prognosis.  
malek ahmad
about 8 years ago
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7
181

bronchiolitis in paediatrics

slide presentation of bronchiolitis in paediatrics, covering about epidemiology, pathology, presentation, investigation and management and prognosis.  
malek ahmad
about 8 years ago
2
0
24

How effective is the stethoscope at eliciting pathology?

I have been thinking for a while, most tests in medicine have a sensitivity and specificity when related to pathology. How does this relate to examination findings and especially those done with the stethoscope in cardiological and respiratory examinations?  
Gareth Lewis
over 8 years ago
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108
2130

Haematology Tutorial

Haematology tutorial covering key topics in haematology  
James Davis
over 8 years ago
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101

Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient - Normal Scenario (with possible pathology).wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to perform the initial assessment of a patient with suspected traumatic injury.<br>This scenario is of an uninjured patient. It includes possible pathology to be found at each step.  
Hussam Rostom
over 8 years ago
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1195

The Visual System

A presentation on the visual system, explains the basic concepts of Anatomy, Physiology, Embryology, Pathology and a little information on examination. It's a great presentation for teaching purposes.  
Raghad Sabbagh
over 8 years ago
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10
209

Dementia

This is a narrated power point presentation on dementia, with a focus on Alzheimer's Disease. It covers: pathology, symptoms and signs, assessment, investigation, differential diagnoses and management.  
Anna Watkinson-Powell
over 8 years ago
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8
240

Calcium - Physiology and pathology

Video tutorial on calcium homeostasis, calcium pathology including hypocalcaemia and hypercalcaemia.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30085
4
154

Upper GI Pathology

Video tutorial outlining upper gastrointestinal disease affecting the oesophagus and stomach. Oesophageal disease processes discussed include gastroesophageal reflux, hiatus hernia, peptic stricture, Barrett's oesophagus, oesophageal carcinoma and achalasia. Disease processes affecting the stomach include gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric lymphoma.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
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Pathology of the Small Intestine

An audio podcast discussing the pathology of the small intestine. This includes a discussion on obstruction, infections diseases and inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's and coeliac disease.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30082o
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35

Pancreatic Pathology

A audio podcast outlining pancreatic disease, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30081o
2
121

Liver pathology 2

Audio podcast outlining the pathological processes that occur in the liver including; infection, alcohol abuse, drugs toxicity, metabolic abnormalities, autoimmune processes and neoplasia.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30080
4
207

Liver pathology 1

Video tutorial outlining the basic anatomy and physiology of the liver followed by a summary of acute and chronic liver disease, hepatic failure and cirrhosis.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30079o
1
98

Liver function tests

This is a chemical pathology podcast on liver function tests.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago
30077o
1
48

Large Bowel Pathology - Gastoenterology

An audio podcast outlining the cellular pathology of the appendix and large intestine.  
Podmedics
over 9 years ago