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Complications of High Blood Pressure or Hypertension - adidarwinian

Complications of High Blood Pressure or Hypertension can be a multitude of deadly diseases including Heart Attack, Stroke, Kidney Failure, Vision Loss, etc.  
adidarwinian.com
about 3 years ago
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Common Sense Pathology

The humble FBC is the clinicians best friend. A simple diagnostic test that can reveal so much. Take a peak.  
rcpa.edu.au
over 2 years ago
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Hypersensitivity to non-painful events may be part of pathology in fibromyalgia

New research shows that patients with fibromyalgia have hypersensitivity to non-painful events based on images of the patients' brains, which show reduced activation in primary sensory regions...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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Occupational medicine at a turning point - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

With the successful control of many of the most serious occupational hazards to health, the focus of occupational medicine in developed countries has shifted to other work related disorders that are rarely fatal but cause substantial disability. This paper hypothesises that many of these disorders do not arise from detectable organic pathology, but rather are a psychologically mediated response to triggering exposures that is conditioned by individual characteristics and cultural circumstances. If correct, this has important implications for the way in which such illness should be managed and prevented. Proposals are made for ways in which the hypothesis could be tested.  
oem.bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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Drones Shown Effective for Delivery of Patient Pathology Samples |

Drones, also known as unmanned aerial systems, will change the face of many industries and may in many ways affect how our society functions. They can give  
medgadget.com
over 2 years ago
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Transcriptomics identifies genes & signaling pathways that may regulate Neurodegeneration

Massive elimination of neurons is a critical aspect of normal nervous system development but also represents a defining feature of neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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TWiV 331: Why is this outbreak different from all other outbreaks? | This Week in Virology

The TWiV team discusses the possible association of the respiratory pathogen enterovirus D68 with neurological disease.  
twiv.tv
over 2 years ago
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Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury

This story starts in 1955, upon the death of Albert Einstein, when the pathologist charged with performing the famous scientist's autopsy stole his brain.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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Myriad publishes myPath Melanoma pivotal validation study

Myriad Genetics, Inc. has announced the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology published data from a pivotal clinical validation study that showed the myPath Melanoma test is highly effective...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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Computerized Staining to Speed Up Digital Pathology | Medgadget

Staining of cells is a basic component of pathology, allowing clinicians and researchers to identify different cell types and to track their activity. It c  
medgadget.com
over 2 years ago
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MGH Develops Molecular Diagnostics Tool on a Smartphone |

By quantifying the number of tumor-marker-targeting microbeads bound to cells (lower images), the D3 system categorizes high- and low-risk cervical biopsy  
medgadget.com
about 2 years ago
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What Happens After the Scan? Dr Kenneth Bloom on Pathology, Detection and Treatment

Breast cancer awareness has come a long way. Today, the fight to find a cure and the campaign to encourage early detection has garnered support from survivors, family members, researchers and fundraisers around the world. Thanks to their efforts, most of us are now in the know and familiar with terms like “mammogram,” “early detection,” and “breast cancer screening”.  
newsroom.gehealthcare.com
about 2 years ago
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Patient commentary: Consider the person alongside the pathology

My experience of being discussed at multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings backs Eigenmann’s view that someone who can present the patient’s perspective should be there.1 It also suggests that patients should be alerted to these meetings and might value the option to represent themselves.  
bmj.com
about 2 years ago
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Tuberculous Pericarditis

A 15-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with symptoms of fever, chest tightness, epigastralgia, and progressive dyspnea for 7 days. There was neither febrile illness nor upper respiratory symptoms among family members. The patient’s grandfather had old tuberculosis but had had no close contact with the patient. The patient had bilateral rales and distant heart sound but no friction rub. Multiple nontender lymph nodes, ≈0.5 cm, were palpated at the neck and inguinal area. Cardiomegaly and blunt costophrenic angles were evident in a plain radiograph of the chest (Figure 1). An echocardiogram revealed the presence of pleural effusion, massive hypodense pericardial effusion with fibrin-like material (Figure 2A and 2B and Movie I in the online-only Data Supplement), partial collapse of the right atrium and right ventricle during diastole, and mild pericardial thickening. Under the impression of pericarditis with cardiac tamponade, he received immediate pericardiocentesis. The fluid was clear and light yellowish in appearance and was lymphocyte predominant (96%) in cell-count analysis. Gram stain, acid-fast stain, bacterial, and fungal cultures all yielded negative results. Cytology revealed no malignant cell. His influenza rapid test was positive for influenza B. However, fever persisted despite the use of antibiotics, including ampicillin-sulbactam and then piperacillin-tazobactam, oseltamivir, and doxycycline. Follow-up echocardiogram and computed tomographic scan 9 days later showed a small amount of hyperdense pericardial effusion and marked thickening (maximum, 1 cm excluding the pericardial space) of pericardium without calcification (Figures 2C, 2D, and 3 and Movie II in the online-only Data Supplement). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were negative for tuberculosis, adenovirus, pan-enterovirus, influenza A/B, and parvovirus B19. Serologies for atypical pathogens and autoimmune screening tests were all negative. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pericardial biopsy was performed, which showed pericardial thickening, ≈1 cm in thickness, with only some fibrin and whitish jelly-like content inside the pericardial space without pericardial effusion (Figure 4). Pathology showed granulomatous inflammation with caseous necrosis in hematoxylin and eosin stain and 1 acid-fast bacillus (Figure 5). Culture of the pericardial fluid and pericardial tissue both grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculous (TB) pericarditis was finally diagnosed, and anti-TB combination therapy was then started. The fever subsided soon, and the patient was discharged 1 week later. Plain radiograph of the chest 4 and 6 months after discharge showed normal heart size and a sharp costophrenic angle (Figure 6). Echocardiography revealed no pericardial effusion and no diastolic dysfunction 3 and 9 months after discharge (Figure 7 and Movie III in the online-only Data Supplement).  
circ.ahajournals.org
about 2 years ago
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Selective vulnerability of Rich Club brain regions is an organizational principle of structural connectivity loss in Huntington’s disease

Huntington’s disease can be predicted many years before symptom onset, and thus makes an ideal model for studying the earliest mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Diffuse patterns of structural connectivity loss occur in the basal ganglia and cortex early in the disease. However, the organizational principles that underlie these changes are unclear. By understanding such principles we can gain insight into the link between the cellular pathology caused by mutant huntingtin and its downstream effect at the macroscopic level. The ‘rich club’ is a pattern of organization established in healthy human brains, where specific hub ‘rich club’ brain regions are more highly connected to each other than other brain regions. We hypothesized that selective loss of rich club connectivity might represent an organizing principle underlying the distributed pattern of structural connectivity loss seen in Huntington’s disease. To test this hypothesis we performed diffusion tractography and graph theoretical analysis in a pseudo-longitudinal study of 50 premanifest and 38 manifest Huntington’s disease participants compared with 47 healthy controls. Consistent with our hypothesis we found that structural connectivity loss selectively affected rich club brain regions in premanifest and manifest Huntington’s disease participants compared with controls. We found progressive network changes across controls, premanifest Huntington’s disease and manifest Huntington’s disease characterized by increased network segregation in the premanifest stage and loss of network integration in manifest disease. These regional and whole brain network differences were highly correlated with cognitive and motor deficits suggesting they have pathophysiological relevance. We also observed greater reductions in the connectivity of brain regions that have higher network traffic and lower clustering of neighbouring regions. This provides a potential mechanism that results in a characteristic pattern of structural connectivity loss targeting highly connected brain regions with high network traffic and low clustering of neighbouring regions. Our findings highlight the role of the rich club as a substrate for the structural connectivity loss seen in Huntington’s disease and have broader implications for understanding the connection between molecular and systems level pathology in neurodegenerative disease.  
brain.oxfordjournals.org
about 2 years ago
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Reclassified AS Patients At Higher Risk of Adverse PCa Pathology

Rates of prostate cancer adverse pathology varied from 24% for men with more than 2 positive biopsy cores to 45% in men reclassified by Gleason score.  
renalandurologynews.com
about 2 years ago