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Cardiovascular Examination OSCE guide

This is a guide to performing a cardiovascular examination in the context of an OSCE exam. It was created by a group of medical students for the free revision website www.geekymedics.com where you can find a written guide to accompany the video. The way in which this examination is carried out varies greatly between individuals & institutions therefore this should be used as a rough framework which you can personalise to suit your own style.  
Lewis Potter
almost 6 years ago
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93
1609

A medical student guide to Red Eye

This booklet was developed as a part of Special Study Unit (Doctors as Teachers) at Peninsula Medical School. This booklet covers some of the important aspects of Ophthalmology. This booklet could be used as a quick revision guide before finals and also could be used along Ophthalmology placements. The purpose of this booklet is to provide some insight into the most common presentations of red eye and their management.  
Nirosa Vicneswararajah
over 4 years ago
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35
1484

Everything you need to know about the Liver

The liver is one of the most confusing organs to get to grips with, and one that medical students know very little about prior to startinf medical school. This document aims to explain everything a first year medical student needs to know about the liver in a clear and concise manner, with the aid of bulletpoints and diagrams.  
Lucy Faulkner
almost 5 years ago
0
27
909

Confidence Building During Medical Training

My fellow medical students, interns, residents and attendings: I am not a medical student but an emeritus professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and also a voluntary faculty member at the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. I have a great deal of contact with medical students and residents. During training (as student or resident), gaining confidence in one's own abilities is a very important part of becoming a practitioner. This aspect of training does not always receive the necessary attention and emphasis. Below I describe one of the events of confidence building that has had an important and lasting influence on my career as an academic physician. I graduated from medical school in Belgium many years ago. I came to the US to do my internship in a small hospital in up state NY. I was as green as any intern could be, as medical school in Belgium at that time had very little hands on practice, as opposed to the US medical graduates. I had a lot of "book knowledge" but very little practical confidence in myself. The US graduates were way ahead of me. My fellow interns, residents and attendings were really understanding and did their best to build my confidence and never made me feel inferior. One such confidence-building episodes I remember vividly. Sometime in the middle part of the one-year internship, I was on call in the emergency room and was called to see a woman who was obviously in active labor. She was in her thirties and had already delivered several babies before. The problem was that she had had no prenatal care at all and there was no record of her in the hospital. I began by asking her some standard questions, like when her last menstrual period had been and when she thought her due date was. I did not get far with my questioning as she had one contraction after another and she was not interested in answering. Soon the bag of waters broke and she said that she had to push. The only obvious action for me at that point was to get ready for a delivery in the emergency room. There was no time to transport the woman to the labor and delivery room. There was an emergency delivery “pack” in the ER, which the nurses opened for me while I quickly washed my hands and put on gloves. Soon after, a healthy, screaming, but rather small baby was delivered and handed to the pediatric resident who had been called. At that point it became obvious that there was one more baby inside the uterus. Realizing that I was dealing with a twin pregnancy, I panicked, as in my limited experience during my obstetrical rotation some months earlier I had never performed or even seen a twin delivery. I asked the nurses to summon the chief resident, who promptly arrived to my great relief. I immediately started peeling off my gloves to make room for the resident to take my place and deliver this twin baby. However, after verifying that this baby was also a "vertex" without any obvious problem, he calmly stood by, and over my objections, bluntly told me “you can do it”, even though I kept telling him that this was a first for me. I delivered this healthy, screaming twin baby in front of a large number of nurses and doctors crowding the room, only to realize that this was not the end of it and that indeed there was a third baby. Now I was really ready to step aside and let the chief resident take over. However he remained calm and again, stood by and assured me that I could handle this situation. I am not even sure how many triplets he had delivered himself as they are not too common. Baby number three appeared quickly and also was healthy and vigorous. What a boost to my self-confidence that was! I only delivered one other set of triplets later in my career and that was by C-Section. All three babies came head first. If one of them had been a breech the situation might have been quite different. What I will never forget is the implied lesson in confidence building the chief resident gave me. I have always remembered that. In fact I have put this approach in practice numerous times when the roles were reversed later in my career as teacher. Often in a somewhat difficult situation at the bedside or in the operating room, a student or more junior doctor would refer to me to take over and finish a procedure he or she did not feel qualified to do. Many times I would reassure and encourage that person to continue while I talked him or her through it. Many of these junior doctors have told me afterwards how they appreciated this confidence building. Of course one has to be careful to balance this approach with patient safety and I have never delegated responsibility in critical situations and have often taken over when a junior doctor was having trouble. Those interested, can read more about my experiences in the US and a number of other countries, in a free e book, entitled "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path" can be downloaded at this link. Enjoy!  
DR William LeMaire
almost 3 years ago
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642

Type 2 diabetes basics

I am writing a series of endocrinology short (10 slide) presentations on key things i think you need to know as medical students. I will do another presentation on complications in more depth comments pleas I will put some audio with it soon  
Nick Thomas
about 6 years ago
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20
533

Mnemonics For Finals

Mnemonics are a great tool for the medical student. They allow complex information to be condensed into a few words and essentially make your memory more efficient. This material is provided by revise4finals (www.revise4finals.co.uk), courtesy of PasTest Online Revision for Medical Students (www.pastest.co.uk). You can find more mnemonics and other revision materials at both of these websites.  
revise4finals.co.uk
almost 2 years ago
Preview
16
1402

Medical Student Apps: Chest X-ray Interpretation (for beginners)

This video tutorial has been made for use with Medical Student Apps: Chest Xrays, an application for the iPhone and iPad. Download the app here for free: htt...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
Cardiovasular 2
15
662

OSCE Skills, clinical examination resources for medical students

Providing medical students with an abundance of free and exclusive e-learning stations for studying for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)  
OSCE Skills
almost 3 years ago
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12
274

Mental Health in Medical Students: Challenges and Opportunities

Objectives: Identify common mental health problems seen in medical students nationally. Describe approaches to improving medical student mental health.  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
6b9ce585453268efc7f4737fb018f8aa
12
403

My Top 5 Tips to Use Social Media to Improve your Medical Education

Introduction Hello and welcome! I am finally back to blogging after having a brief hiatus in order to take my final exams. Whilst the trauma is still fresh in my mind, I would like to share with you the top 5 social media tips that helped me through the dark days of undergraduate medicine. Some of you may have already read my old essay on 'How Medical Students should interact with Social Media Networking Sites' and this document deals with some of the problems with professionalism surrounding the use of social media. This blog will not cover such issues, but will instead focus on how you can use social media to benefit your learning/ revision processes. Top Tip 1: YouTube For those of you who are unaware, YouTube is a video-sharing website. Sometimes the site is overlooked as a 'social media' resource but if you consider the simple definition of Social Networking Sites as 'those with user led content,' you can quickly see how YouTube definitely falls into the social media category. It wasn't until I got to University that I realised the potency of YouTube as an educational tool. It has a use at every stage of medical education and it is FREE. If you are still in your pre-clinical training then there are a wealth of videos that depict cellular processes and 3D anatomy - very useful content for the visual learner. For the clinical student, there are a number of OSCE demonstration videos that may be useful in honing your examination skills. There are also a number of presentations on clinical topics that have been uploaded, however, YouTube has no quality control measures for these videos (to my knowledge) so it may be best to subscribe to a more official source if you like to use podcasts/ uploaded presentations for your revision. Another reason YouTube comes in as my number 1 top tip is because I find it difficult to procrastinate whilst using the site. Sure, you can start looking up music and videos that have nothing to do with medicine but personally I find that having a little bit of music on in the background helps me work for longer periods, which is a definite bonus during the revision period. On the other hand, there are many that find YouTube difficult to harness due to the draw of funny videos and favourite Vloggers (Video Bloggers) that can distract the unwary from revision for hours on end. At the end of the day, YouTube was created for funny videos (predominantly of cats it seems) and not for medical education, and this should be kept in mind if you choose to use it as a tool for your learning. Top Tip 2: Facebook Yes, the dreaded Facebook comes in at number two for me. Facebook is by far and away my largest source of procrastination when it comes to writing / working / revising or learning. It is a true devil in disguise, however, there are some very useful features for those who like to work in groups during their revision... For example, during the last six months I have organised a small revision group through Facebook. We set up a 'private page' and each week I would post what topics would be covered in the weeks session. Due to the nature of Facebook, people were obviously able to reply to my posts with suggestions for future topics etc. We were also able to upload photos of useful resources that one or more of us had seen in a tutorial in which the other students hadn't been able to attend. And most importantly, we were able to upload revision notes for each other via the Facebook 'files' tab. This last feature was invaluable for sharing basic notes between a few close colleagues. However, for proper file sharing I strongly recommend the file sharing service 'Dropbox,' which provides free storage for your documents and the ability to access files from any computer or device with internet. Coming back to Facebook, my final thoughts are: if you don't like group work or seeing what your colleagues are doing via their statuses or private messages then it probably isn't a useful resource for you. If you have the motivation (unlike myself) to freeze your Facebook account I can imagine you would end up procrastinating far less (or you'll start procrastinating on something else entirely!). Top Tip 3: Twitter Twitter is a microblogging site. This means that users upload microblogs or 'Tweets' containing useful information they have found on the internet or read in other people's tweets. Twitter's utility as an educational resource is directly related to the 'type' of people you follow. For example, I use Twitter primarily to connect with other people interested in social media, art & medicine and medical education. This means my home screen on twitter is full of people posting about these topics, which I find useful. Alternatively, I could have used my Twitter account to 'follow' all the same friends I 'follow' on Facebook. This would have meant my Twitter home page would have felt like a fast-paced, less detailed version of my Facebook feed just with more hashtags and acronyms - not very useful for finding educational resources. With this in mind, consider setting up two twitter accounts to tease apart the useful tweets about the latest clinical podcast from the useless tweets about what your second cousin once removed just had for lunch. A friend suggested to me that if you really get into twitter it is also possible to use one account and 'group' your followers so that you can see different 'types' of tweets at different times. This seems like a good way to filter the information you are reading, as long as you can figure out how to set up the filters in the first place. Like all Social Media Sites, Twitter gets its fair share of bad press re. online professionalism and its tendency to lure users into hours of procrastination. So again, use with caution. Top Tip 4: Meducation It would not be right to write this blog and not include Meducation in the line-up. Meducation is the first website that I have personally come across where users (students, doctors etc) upload and share information (i.e. the very soul of what social networking is about) that is principally about medicine and nothing else. I'm sure there may be other similar sites out there, but the execution of this site is marvellous and that is what has set it apart from its competitors and lead to its rapid growth (especially over the last two years, whilst i've been aware of the site). When I say 'execution,' I mean the user interface (which is clean and simple), the free resources (giving a taste of the quality of material) and the premium resources (which lecture on a variety of interesting clinical topics rather than sticking to the bread and butter topics 24/7). One of my favourite features of Meducation is the ability to ask 'Questions' to other users. These questions are usually asked by people wishing to improve niche knowledge and so being able to answer a question always feels like a great achievement. Both the questions and answers are mostly always interesting, however the odd question does slip through the net where it appears the person asking the question might have skipped the 'quick google search' phase of working through a tough topic. Meducation harnesses social networking in an environment almost free from professionalism and procrastination issues. Therefore, I cannot critique the site from this angle. Instead, I have decided to highlight the 'Exam Room' feature of the website. The 'Exam Room' lets the user take a 'mock exam' using what I can only assume is a database of questions crafted by the Meducation team themselves (+/- submissions from their user base). However, it is in my opinion that this feature is not up to scratch with the level and volume of questions provided by the competitors in this niche market. I feel wrong making this criticism whilst blogging on Meducation and therefore I will not list or link the competitors I am thinking of here, but they will be available via my unaffiliated blog (Occipital Designs). I hope the Meducation team realise that I make this observation because I feel that with a little work their question database could be improved to the point where it is even better than other sites AND there would also be all the other resources Meducation has to offer. This would make Meducation a truly phenomenal resource. Top Tip 5: Blogging Blogging itself is very useful. Perhaps not necessarily for the learning / revision process but for honing the reflective process. Reflective writing is a large component of undergrad medical education and is disliked by many students for a number of reasons, not least of which is because many find some difficulty in putting their thoughts and feelings on to paper and would much prefer to write with the stiffness and stasis of academic prose. Blogging is great practice for breaking away from essay-writing mode and if you write about something you enjoy you will quickly find you are easily incorporating your own personal thoughts and feelings into your writing (as I have done throughout this blog). This is a very organic form of reflection and I believe it can greatly improve your writing when you come to write those inevitable reflective reports. Conclusion Thanks for reading this blog. I hope I have at least highlighted some yet unharnessed aspects of the sites and resources people already commonly use. Please stay tuned in the next week or two for more on social media in medicine. I am working together with a colleague to produce 'Guidelines for Social Media in Medicine,' in light of the recent material on the subject by the General Medical Council. Please feel free to comment below if you feel you have a Top Tip that I haven't included! LARF Twitter Occipital Designs My Blog As always, any views expressed here are mine alone and are not representative of any organisation. A Worthy Cause... Also, on a separate note: check out Anatomy For Life - a charity medical art auction raising money for organ donation. Main Site Facebook Twitter  
Dr. Luke Farmery
almost 4 years ago
30155
12
213

Cranial Nerves Examination

This video tutorial teaches a comprehensive approach to cranial nerves examination. It is part of the MedPrep video tutorial series: http://www.medprep.in/clinical-examination-videos.php On YouTube, the MedPrep video tutorial series has received nearly 24,000 hits. The video series features myself, Sohaib Rufai, third year medical student at the University of Southampton, along with Iftkhar Hussein, an Economics student at the University of Manchester playing the patient, and Fahad Khan, a Clinical Sciences student at the University of Bradford, filming. The videos were then edited by myself. The aim was to produce a useful video series that is easy to follow, at times adding a bit of humour. The patient also put in extra time at the gym especially for the videos. The MedPrep website has been developed by a group of us at University of Southampton, aiming to provide free useful learning aids for medical students.  
Soton
almost 5 years ago
B7529db325b26dad1d7cbf7b580a6d45
12
961

How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
about 3 years ago
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Assessment Questions

Information on some of the assessment questions for 1st year medics at Birmingham University Medical School  
Mr Raymond Buick
about 5 years ago
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11
246

Interactive Learning Resource - MCQ website

The site contains an extensive range of MCQs and “fill in the blank” style questions for years one through to five of my Medical degree at Leeds. The site can be viewed here; http://mcqs.leedsmedics.org.uk The site proved to be very popular. It has had over 18,000 page loads in the last month, with an average of 244 visitors per day. I decided to extend it so that it could provide a wider range of information source for medical students. I did this by approaching the MSRC as I felt that they could benefit greatly from a website. The resulting website now contains a wealth of study resources, links to other student groups, and links to useful information sources (e.g. finance, accommodation, personal support). The site also keeps medical students up to date with news around the medical school and provides a port of call for those wishing to contact members of the MSRC or buy ‘Leeds Medics’ tops from an ethical supplier. This site has also proved to be very popular, with over 4000 page loads in the last month and an average of 77 unique visitors per day. It also gives potential medical students a professional looking point of contact with current students at Leeds. I have now finished my final exams, but I have handed over instructions for how the site can be managed and updated to the IT Rep in the MSRC and hope that it will continue to provide a useful resource for students studying medicine for years to come. The site can be viewed here; http://msrc.leedsmedics.org.uk, and the section with MCQs can be viewed here; http://mcqs.leedsmedics.org.uk  
brian mcmillan
almost 6 years ago
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8
218

Medical School - Antibiotics: Fluoroquinolones

Discussion of the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/iMedSchool Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Imedicalschool?ref=hl iTunes Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/imedicalschool/id577103998?mt=2 iMedicalSchool is a channel dedicated to helping you understand complex medical topics in a simple manner. We are dedicated to making sure that you understand every topic presented. We are happy to answer questions and take suggestions. No matter if you are in medical school, nursing school or physician assistant school we are here to serve you.  
Nicole Chalmers
about 3 years ago
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8
379

How to memorize in medical school

I show you how to use the memorization technique called the method of loci. Link to the material: http://mnemotechnics.org/wiki/Method_of_Loci Memorization i...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
29948
8
197

Antibacterials

A video made by Imperial College Yr5 Medical Students to illustrate the mechanisms of actions of various different antibiotic classes  
Salman Waqar
almost 6 years ago
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7
304

Common station surgical stations for final year medical students

Key surgical topics that may come up in surgical osces  
Anisha Sukha
about 5 years ago
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7
269

Geeky Medics | free medical student revision notes + OSCE

Geeky medics provides free medical revision notes crafted for medical students including OSCE guides, clinical skills videos and quizzes. Get your geek on!  
Geeky Medics
about 3 years ago
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7
255

The Best Reference Sites For Medical Students

When I'm not writing Mac articles for MakeUseOf, I'm a full-time medical student and I have to say that life as a medical student is insufferably horrible.  
MakeUseOf
about 3 years ago