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Dr Mark Newbold: Why should doctors get involved in management?

Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of the Heart of England Foundation Trust, lectures as part of the Alumni Leadership Talks series.  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 jpe0ks?1444774148
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246

Surprising places to find Medical Leadership

When I first started thinking about Medical Leadership and Management (MLM) it was because I like to see things work. When anything doesn't work, or something is inefficient or I think a system could be designed to make life easier - I get pretty annoyed. So, being irritated in things is what got me interested in MLM, but now it seems that I spend quite a lot of time thinking about MLM just because it is so ubiquitous. Almost any day you spend in hospital will involve you witnessing MLM on an almost minute by minute basis - even if you don't notice it! Recently, I have being working on a number of projects in my spare time (mostly out of interest but partly to secure those elusive foundation program points), which involved reading quite a few journal articles on a number of subjects ranging from the "trauma care" to "gastric banding". What surprised me was the prevalence of phrases like "....teams need greater training in medical leadership to improve patient outcomes..." or "...medical education needs to include greater emphasis of soft skills such as communication, team work and team leadership.." The profession's views on MLM have obviously been developing for a while, within the literature and now some organisations are really taking this ethos to heart, but it is still not a universal phenomenon. So, I thought it would be interesting to post this blog and start documenting random places where MLM is mentioned. If anyone reading this finds any surprising mentions then please do paste the link to the article in the comments section.  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 8occ4b?1444774213
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147

A taste of someone else's medicine

Choosing a career path is one of the hardest (non-clinical) decisions many doctors will face in their professional lives. With almost 100 specialties and sub-specialties available, settling on any one career can seem pretty daunting, particularly as in the majority of cases the choice will set a path you’re likely to be on for the next 30+ years. But, with only a very small range of these specialties and almost none of the sub-specialties available to undertake as rotations during any one foundation programme, finding out what actually working in different specialties is like can be difficult. It’s likely you’ll have at least identified an area you’re kind of/maybe interested in before starting the foundation programme but, to use a total cliché, you wouldn't buy a car without taking it for a test drive, right? There is good evidence to show that any experience, even if only brief, can be very influential on career choice and this is why all deaneries offer new doctors to undertake a ‘taster week’ at some point during the Foundation Programme. This is usually from 2-5 days, taken as study leave, in a specialty of the doctor’s choosing which they haven’t and won’t work during their foundation programme. Most hospitals will allow doctors to do this at an external hospital or organisation if the desired specialty isn't available locally. Tasters are often organised by the trainee but deaneries are encouraged to provide a list or register of structured taster programmes to its trainees. A timetable split into half-day activities, including time for 1:1 discussion with both consultants and trainees, should be provided or agreed with a supervisor, which gives the doctor as broad an experience of the roles, responsibilities, highlights, challenges and lifestyle of the specialty as possible. This should then give the doctor plenty of food for thought and provide an opportunity for (you guessed it) reflection to confirm or exclude that specialty as a career choice and identify (if the former) what steps they need to take to get there. At the end of the experience the doctor should fill in a feedback form and formally reflect in their portfolio. Taster weeks aren't limited to particular specialties and sub-specialties either; there are plenty of more over-arching opportunities such as experiencing leadership and management roles or getting involved in academia, research or medical education. As long as you can identify and describe what you’ll aim to learn or understand from the experience, almost any taster is possible. So, how do you go about it? Each deanery should have a policy relating to taster weeks, or have an responsible administrator who can provide advice. Talking to your educational supervisor can also be really useful. Considering early on in FY1 which area or specialty you want to explore is important; time runs out scarily quickly and taking time out of rotations needs careful planning and co-ordination to make sure there is enough cover for your day job. You may already know or have identified an appropriate supervisor who will facilitate the experience but if not, your supervisor or administrator will almost certainly be able to point you in the right direction. You’ll never get to experience every possible career path before starting out on one; the specialty or sub-specialty you eventually work in may not even exist yet. But getting an idea of what you’ll definitely consider, or definitely won’t, will give you a better chance of identifying something that will suit you personally and professionally, and, particularly in the more competitive and run-though specialties will give you another example of commitment to specialty. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box or look at something really niche – it may give you a taste for something unexpected that you’ll love for life. References: http://www.foundationprogramme.nhs.uk/download.asp?file=Tasters_guidance_2011_final-2.pdf  
Dr Lydia Spurr
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1hvig6h?1444774122
3
158

Mr Tim Smart “Learning to Lead” - Birmingham Medical Leadership Society Lecture 2

Last Wednesday (27/11/13) was Birmingham Medical Leadership Society’s second lecture in its autumn series on why healthcare professionals should become involved in management and leadership. Firstly, a really big thank you to Mr Smart for travelling all the way to Birmingham for free (!) to speak to us. It was a brilliant event and certainly sparked some debate. A second big thank you to Michelle and Angie – the University of Birmingham Alumni and marketing team who helped organise this event and recorded it – a video will hopefully be available online soon. Mr Tim Smart is the CEO of King’s NHS Foundation Trust and has been for the last few years – a period in which King’s has had some of the most successive hospital statistics in the UK. Is there a secret to managing such a successful hospital? “It’s a people business. Patients are what we are here for and we must never forget that” Mr Smart doesn’t enjoy giving lectures, so instead he had an “intimate chat” covering his personal philosophy of why we as medical students and junior doctors should consider a career in management at some point. Good managers should be people persons. Doctors are selected for being good at talking to and listening to people – these are directly translatable skills. Good managers should be team leaders. Medicine is becoming more and more a team occupation, we are all trained to work, think and act as a team and especially doctors are expected to know how to lead this team. Again, a directly transferable skill. Good managers need to know how to make decisions based on incomplete knowledge and basic statistics. Doctors make life-altering clinical decisions every day based statistics and incomplete knowledge. A very important directly transferable skill. Good managers get out of their offices, meet the staff and walk around their empires. Doctors, whether surgeons, GP’s or radiologists have to walk around the hospitals on their routine business and have to deal with a huge variety of staff from every level. To be a great doctor you need to know how to get the best out of the staff around you, to get the tasks done that your patients’ need. Directly transferable skills. Good managers are quick on the up-take and are always looking for new ways to improve their departments. Doctors have to stay on top of the literature and are committed to a life-time of learning new and complex topics. Directly transferable. Good managers are honest and put in place systems that try to prevent bad situations occurring again. Good doctors are honest and own up when they make a mistake, they then try to ensure that that mistake isn’t made again. Directly Transferable. Even good managers sometimes have difficulties getting doctors to do what they want – because the managers are not doctors. Doctors that become managers still have the professional reputation of a doctor. A very transferable asset that can be used to encourage their colleagues to do what should be done. A good manager values their staff – especially the nurses. A good doctor knows just how important the nurses, ODP, physio’s and other healthcare professionals and hospital staff are. This is one of the best reasons why doctors should get involved with management. We understand the front line. We know the troops. We know the problems. We are more than capable of thinking of some of the solutions! “Project management isn’t magic” “Everything done within a hospital should be to benefit patients – therefore everything in the hospital should be answerable to patients, including the hospital shop!” “Reward excellence, otherwise you get mediocrity” At the present The University of Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society is in contact with the FMLM and other similar groups at the Universities of Bristol, Barts and Oxford. We are looking to get in contact with every other society in the country. If you are a new or old MLS then please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you and are happy to help your societies in any way we can – we would also love to attend your events so please do send us an invite. Email us at med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @UoBMedLeaders Find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Come along to our up coming events… Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust Wednesday 22nd January 2014 LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Has the NHS lost the ability to care?’ – responding to the Mid Staffs inquiry’ By Prof Jon Glasby, Director of the Health Services Management Centre , UoB Thursday 20th February LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Creating a Major Trauma Unit at the UHB Trust’ By Sir Prof Keith Porter, Professor of Traumatology, UHB Saturday 8th March LT3 Medical School, 1pm ‘Applying the Theory of Constraints to Healthcare By Mr A Dinham and J Nieboer ,QFI Consulting  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
%3fr=0
3
174

Doing more with less: own Pride and Joy.

“There is nothing new under the sun” - Ecclesiastes 1:4-11. If any of you have read one of my blogs before you will have realised that I am a huge fan of books. The blog I am writing today is also about a book, but more than that, it is about an idea. The idea is simple, practical and nothing especially new. It is an idea that many call common sense but few call common practice. It is an idea that has been used in every sort of organisation for over 20 years. It is an idea that needs to be applied on a greater scale to the health service. The idea is not new. How the book is written is not new. But how the book explains the idea and applies it to healthcare is new and it will change how you view the health service. It is a revolutionary book. The book is called “Pride and Joy” by Alex Knight view here. How I came to read this book is a classic story of a Brownian motion (a chance encounter), leading to an altered life trajectory. The summer before starting medical school I was working as a labourer cleaning out a chaps guttering. During a tea break in the hot summer sun he asked me what I was going to study at Uni. As soon as I said “Medicine”, he said “then you need to come see this”. He took me into his office and showed me a presentation he had given the year before about a hospital in Ireland. He was a management consultant and had been applying a management theory he had learned while working in industry. With his help the hospital had managed to reduce waiting times by a huge amount. The management theory he was applying is called "The Theory of Constraints" (TOC). I thought that his presentation was fascinating and I could not understand why it was not more widely applied. I went away and read the books he suggested and promised that I would stay in touch. Four years later and I had been exposed to enough of the clinical environment to realise that something needs to change in how the health service is run. To this end, a couple of colleagues and myself founded the Birmingham Medical Leadership society (BMLS) with help from the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management (FMLM). The aim of which is to help healthcare students and professionals understand the systems they are working in. The first thing I did after founding the society was contact that friendly management consultant and ask him for his advice on what we should cover. He immediately put me in contact with QFI consulting, @QFIConsulting. This small firm has been working with hospitals all over the world to implement this simple theory called the Theory of Constraints. They were absolutely fantastic and within 2 emails had promised to come to Birmingham to run a completely free workshop for our society’s members. The workshop was on March 8th at Birmingham Medical School. Through our society’s contacts we managed to encourage 15 local students to take a revision break to attend the workshop on a sunny Saturday. We were also able to find 11 local registrars/ consultants who wanted to improve their management knowledge. It just so happens that the chap leading this workshop was Mr Alex Knight. The workshop sparked all of our interests and when he mentioned that he had just written a book, pretty much the whole crowd asked for a copy. When I got my copy, I thought I would leave it to read for after my end of year exams. However, I got very bored a few days before the first written paper and needed a revision break – so I decided that reading a few pages here and there wouldn't hurt. Trouble was that this book was a page turner and I soon couldn't put it down. I won’t spoil the book for all of you out there, who I hope will read it. I shall just say that if you are interested in healthcare, training to work in healthcare, already work in healthcare or just want a riveting book to read by the pool then you really should read it. The basic premise is that healthcare is getting more expensive and yet there appears to be an increase in the number of healthcare crises'. So if more money isn't making healthcare better, then maybe it is time to try a different approach. “Marketing is what you do when your product is no good” – Edward Land, inventor of the Polaroid Camera. Mr Land was a wise man and I can happily say that I have no conflict of interest in writing this blog. I have not been promised anything in return for this glowing review. The only reason that I have written this is because I believe it is important for people to have a greater understanding of how the health service works and what we can do to make it even better! As a very junior healthcare professional, there is not much that we can do on a practical level but that does not mean we are impotent. We can still share best practice and show our enthusiasm for new approaches. Healthcare students and professionals, if you care about how your service works and you want to help make it better. Please find a copy of this book and read it. It won’t take you long and I promise that it will have an impact on you. NB - Note all of the folded down corners. These pages have something insightful that I want to read again... there are a lot of folded pages!  
jacob matthews
about 7 years ago
Preview
3
31

The Leadership Council - The Effect of Childhood Trauma on Brain Development

As recently as the 1980s, many professionals thought that by the time babies are born, the structure of their brains was already genetically determined. However, emerging research shows evidence of altered brain functioning as a result of early abuse and neglect. The key to why this occurs appears to be in the brain.  
leadershipcouncil.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview 300x412
2
452

Innovative Programme Elements Add Value to a FAIMER Regional Institute Faculty Development Fellowship Model in Southern Africa

The Foundation for the Advancement of Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) is a US-based non-profit organisation committed to improving health professions education to improve global health. FAIMER traditionally offers a two year fellowship programme; 2 residential and 3 distance learning sessions and an education innovation project in the fellow’s home institution. The focus is on education methods, leadership/management, scholarship and the development of an international community of health professions educators. During the past 5 years, FAIMER has expanded the programme and established regional institutes in India[3], Brazil[1] and Southern Africa (SAFRI)[1]. We implemented the programme in Africa in 2008, introducing 5 innovations to the generic programme. SAFRI was created as an independent voluntary association to reflect the multinational intent of the programme. Aim of project To understand the impact of the innovations in the structure and implementation of the programme on its quality and the experience of the participants in it. Conclusions Faculty development programmes can significantly enhance their impact: Be sensitive to the local political climate Demonstrate wide ownership Focus on developing a community of practice Work within the professional time constraints of Fellows and faculty Maximise learning opportunities by linking to other scholarly activities  
Juanita Bezuidenhout
over 11 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1f9109k?1444774063
2
2679

Criticizing the NHS - Can students do this productively?

In this month’s SBMJ (May 2013) a GP called Dr Michael Ingram has written a very good article highlighting some of the problems with the modern NHS’s administrative systems, especially relating to the huge amount of GP time wasted on following up after administrative errors and failings. I personally think that it is important for people working within the NHS to write articles like this because without them then many of us would be unaware of these problems or would feel less confident in voicing our own similar thoughts. The NHS is a fantastic idea and does provide an excellent service compared to many other health care systems around the world, but there is always room for improvement – especially on the administrative side! The issues raised by Dr Ingram were: Histology specimens being analysed but reports not being sent to the GP on time or with the correct information. Histology reports not being discussed with patient’s directly when they try and contact the hospital to find out the results and instead being referred to their GP, who experiences the problem stated above. GP’s are being left to deal with patient’s problems that have nothing to do with the GP and their job and have everything to do with an inefficient NHS bureaucracy. These problems and complaints often taking up to a third of a GP’s working day and thereby reducing the time they can spend actually treating patients. Having to arrange new outpatient appointments for patients when their appointment letters went missing or when appointments were never made etc. Even getting outpatient appointments in the first place and how these are often delayed well after the recommended 6 week wait. Patients who attend outpatient appointments often have to consult their GP to get a prescription that the hospital consultant has recommended, so that the GP bares the cost and not the hospital. My only issue with this article is that Dr Ingram highlights a number of problems with the NHS systems but then does not offer a single solution/idea on how these systems could be improved. When medical students are taught to write articles for publication it is drummed into us that we should always finish the discussion section with a conclusion and recommendations for further work/ implications for practice. I was just thinking that if doctors, medical students, nurses and NHS staff want to complain about the NHS’s failings then at least suggest some ways of improving these problems at the same time. This then turns what is essentially a complaint/rant into helpful, potentially productive criticism. If you (the staff) have noticed that these problems exist then you have also probably given some thought to why the problem exists, so why not just say/write how you think the issue could be resolved? If your grievances and solutions are documented and available then someone in the NHS administration might take your idea up and actually put it into practice, potentially reducing the problem (a disgustingly idealist thought I know). A number of times I have been told during medical school lectures and at key note speeches at conferences that medical students are a valuable resource to the NHS administration because we visit different hospitals, we wander around the whole hospital, we get exposed to the good and bad practice and we do not have any particular loyalty to any one department and can therefore objective observations. So, I was thinking it might be interesting to ask as many medical students as possible for their thoughts on how to improve the systems within the NHS. So I implore any of you reading this blog: write your own blog about short comings that you have noticed, make a recommendation for how to improve it and then maybe leave a link in the comments below this blog. If we start taking more of an interest in the NHS around us and start documenting where improvements could be made then maybe we could together work to create a more efficient and effective NHS. So I briefly just sat down and had a think earlier today about a few potential solutions for the problems highlighted in Dr Ingram’s article. A community pathology team that handles all of the GP’s pathology specimens and referrals. A “patient pathway co-ordinator” could be employed as additional administrative staff by GP surgeries to chase up all of the appointments and missing information that is currently using up a lot of the GP’s time and thereby freeing them to see more patients. I am sure this role is already carried out by admin staff in GP practices but perhaps in an ad hoc way, rather than that being their entire job. Do the majority of GP practices get access to the hospitals computer systems? Surely, if GPs had access to the hospital systems this would mean a greater efficiency for booking outpatient appointments and for allowing GPs to follow up test results etc. In the few outpatient departments I have come across outpatient appointments are often made by the administration team and then sent by letter to the patients, with the patient not being given a choice of when is good for them. Would it not be more efficient for the administrative staff to send the patients a number of appointment options for the patient to select one appropriate for them? Eliyahu M. Goldratt was a business consultant who revolutionized manufacturing efficiency a few years ago. He wrote a number of books on his theories that are very interesting and easy to read because he tries to explain most of his points using a narrative – “The Goal” and “Critical Chain” being just tow. His business theories focussed on finding the bottle neck in an industrial process, because if that is the rate limiting step in the manufacturing process then it is the most essential part for improving efficiency of the whole process. Currently, most GPs refer patients to outpatient appointments at hospitals and this can often take weeks or months. The outpatient appointments are a bottle neck in the process of getting patients the care they require. Therefore, focussing attention on how outpatient appointments are co-ordinated and run would improve the efficiency in the “patient pathway” as a whole. a. Run more outpatient clinics. b. Pay consultants overtime to do more clinics, potentially in the evenings or at weekends. While a lot may not want to do this, a few may volunteer and help to reduce the back log on the waiting lists. c. Have more patients seen by nurse specialists so that more time is freed up for the consultants to see the more urgent or serious patients. d. An obvious, yet expensive solution, hire more consultants to help with the ever increasing workload. e. Change the outpatient system so that it becomes more of an assembly line system with one doctor and a team of nurses handling the “new patient” appointments and another team handling the “old patient” follow up appointments rather than having them all mixed together at the same time. I am sure that there are many criticisms of the points I have written above and I would be interested to hear them. I would also love to hear any other solutions for the problems mentioned above. Final thought for today … Why shouldn’t medical students make criticisms of inefficiencies and point them out to the relevant administrator? If anyone else is interested in how the NHS as a whole is run then there is a new organisation called the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management that is keen to recruit interested student members (www.fmlm.ac.uk).  
jacob matthews
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xyj9qx?1444774087
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661

The NEW Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society

Who are we? This society has been formed by a core group of clinical year medical students at the University of Birmingham. We are hoping that lots more healthcare students at UoB will join us soon. This society is open to any student who has a keen interest in healthcare management – Nurse, physio, BMedSc, Medical student, Business student, dentist and pharmacist are all welcome. Why do we exist? Healthcare has become more complex. To ensure that patient’s receive the most effective treatments then healthcare services need to be organised effectively. This might be your role one day and you won’t receive any formal training in management theory or on team working and leadership skills from the University – knowledge that is essential to providing the best care for our patients. Studies have shown that clinicians who have received management training and who take an active role in managing the departments they belong to have achieved significantly decreased complication and mortality rates. What do we plan to do? 1) Raise awareness amongst healthcare students about the opportunities to be involved in healthcare management in their future careers. 2) The society hopes to act as an intermediary between healthcare students keen to make contacts with likeminded individuals in other course and years. We intend to have regular social events that allow everyone to practice their essential networking skills while at discussions over coffee, nights out, games of golf or away day visits to conferences and organisational visits. 3) The society will be holding lectures given by eminent professionals from all areas of healthcare management – The NHS, DoH, Armed forces, private organisations, think tanks, consultancy firms and leading researchers. 4) The society aims to help students foster essential leadership and team working skills that will be required in their future professional roles. These skills will be developed informally and during seminars and workshops. These skills will then be put to the test in high stress situations like Paintballing, laser tag and outdoor activities. 5) The final main aim of this society is to help students make contacts with clinicians and researchers who are working on improving healthcare systems and who need healthcare students to help with research. We hope to develop a network of contacts who are willing to provide research and audit opportunities to keen students. Are you interested in joining the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society? Then please email the committee at: med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Or come find us at the MedSoc Freshers fair in September. The Student medical leadership society (SMiLeS) useful resources!!! Why is it important? student BMJ 2012;345:e5319 http://www.leadingsystemsnetwork.com/pdf/Management_Matters.pdf http://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/11/02/improving-performance-nhs http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e5015 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=healthcare+reform Undergrad oppurtunities http://www.diagnosisltd.co.uk/ http://www.ihi.org/offerings/ihiopenschool/Pages/default.aspx http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/business-school/programmes/msc-health-management?gclid=CPTQy6bCwLgCFS3HtAodZ1sAtQ http://medicalleadership.net/committee/ http://www.lead-in.co.uk/ http://www.ihi.org/offerings/IHIOpenSchool/Chapters/Pages/SQLA.aspx Foundation year opportunities http://www.stfs.org.uk/faculty/leadership Future career opportunities http://www.leadership.londondeanery.ac.uk/home/fellowships%20in%20clinical%20education http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/get-involved/harkness-fellowship Higher Education http://www.surrey.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/business/healthcaremanagement/ http://www.open.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/main/study-us/leadership http://www.manchester.ac.uk/postgraduate/taughtdegrees/courses/atoz/course/?code=05855 http://www.brunel.ac.uk/bbs/mba/mba-specialisations/healthcare-management http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/courses/postgraduate/taught/social-policy/health-care-policy-management.aspx http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/social-policy/departments/health-services-management-centre/index.aspx Free Learning/ Relevant organisations http://www.qficonsulting.com/healthcare/qfi-healthcare http://www.tocthinkers.com/ http://www.tocthinkers.com/2012/05/qa-performance-improvement-for-healthcare-leading-change-with-lean-six-sigma-and-constraints-managem.html http://www.institute.nhs.uk/quality_and_service_improvement_tools/quality_and_service_improvement_tools/theory_of_constraints.html http://www.dbrmfg.co.nz https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=theory+of+constraints&rlz=1C1CHMC_enGB501GB502&oq=Theory+of+con&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j5j69i65j0j69i62.4977j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_constraints http://www.york.ac.uk/che/ http://www.ihm.org.uk/ Relevant Journals http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/342359/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/bmj.c5072.full.pdf www.civitas.org.uk/doctors/index.php http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/342359/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/bmj.c5072.full.pdf http://www.hsj.co.uk/# http://www.bjhcm.co.uk/ book list http://www.amazon.co.uk/Performance-Improvement-Healthcare-Constraints-ebook/dp/B005RWFOSE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374945477&sr=8-1&keywords=Performance+Improvement+for+Healthcare http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_6?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=goldratt&sprefix=Goldra%2Cdigital-text%2C142&rh=i%3Adigital-text%2Ck%3Agoldratt Final Summary Did you know that you may not just work for the NHS, but also help to run it? The new Medical Leadership Society aims to foster leadership skills in healthcare students through talks from NHS leaders, the DoH and even the Armed Forces. We provide a way for you to learn about being a leader and influencing policies in the NHS, and our talks and events will serve as an excellent platform for you to start making influential contacts within areas that interest you. You’ll also practice those leadership skills in an array of activities, including paintballing and laser tag!  
jacob matthews
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1hbf5w2?1444774116
2
278

Creating the Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine Service in the West Midlands –The Inaugural lecture of the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society

Many thanks to everyone who attended the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society’s first ever lecture on November 7th 2013. The committee was extraordinarily pleased with the turn out and hope to see you all at our next lectures. We must also say a big thank you to Dr Nicholas Crombie for being our Inaugural speaker, he gave a fantastic lecture and we have received a number of rave reviews and requests for a follow up lecture next year! Dr Crombie’s talk focussed on three main areas: 1) A short personal history focussing on why and how Dr Crombie became head of one of the UK’s best Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine (PHEM) services and the first post-graduate dean in charge of PHEM trainees. 2) The majority of the lecture was a case history on the behind the scenes activity that was required to create the West Midlands Pre-Hospital Network and training program. In summary, over a decade ago it was realised that the UK was lagging behind other developed nations in our Emergency Medicine and Trauma service provisions. There were a number of disjointed and only partially trained services in place for major incidents. The British government and a number of leading health think-tanks put forward proposals for creating a modern effective service. Dr Crombie was a senior doctor in the West Midlands air ambulance charity, the BASICS program and had worked with the West Midlands Ambulance service. Dr Crombie was able to collect a team of senior doctors, nurses, paramedics and managers from all of the emergency medicine services and charities within the West Midlands together. This collaboration of ambulance service, charities, BASIC teams, CARE team and NHS Trusts was novel to the UK. The collaboration was able to tender for central government and was the first such scheme in the UK to be approved. Since the scheme’s approval 5 major trauma units have been established within the West Midlands and a new trauma desk was created at the Ambulance service HQ which can call on the help of a number of experienced teams that can be deployed within minutes to a major incident almost anywhere in the West Midlands. This major reformation of a health service was truly inspirational, especially when it was achieved by a number of clinicians with relatively little accredited management training and without them giving up their clinical time, a true clinical leadership success story. 3) The last component of the evening was Dr Crombie’s thoughts on why this project had been successful and how simple basic principles could be applied to almost any other project. Dr Crombie’s 3 big principles were: Collaborate – leave your ego’s at the door and try to put together a team that can work together. If you have to, invite everyone involved to a free dinner at your expense – even doctors don’t turn down free food! Governance – establish a set of rules/guidelines that dictate how your project will be run. Try to get everyone involved singing off the same hymn sheet. A very good example of this from Dr Crombie’s case history was that all of the services involved in the scheme agreed to use the same emergency medicine kit and all follow the same Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), so that when the teams work together they almost work as one single effective team rather than distinct groups that cannot interact. Resilience – the service you reform/create must withstand the test of time. If a project is solely driven by one person then it will collapse as soon as that person moves on. This is a well-known problem with the NHS as a whole, new managers always have “great new ideas” and as soon as that manager changes job all of their hard work goes to waste. To ensure that a project has resilience, the “project manager” must create a sense of purpose and ownership of the project within their teams. Members of the team must “buy in” to the goals of the project and one of the best ways of doing that is to ask the team members for their advice on how the project should proceed. If people feel a project was their idea then they are far more likely to work for it. This requires the manager to keep their ego on a short leash and to let their team take credit. The take home message from this talk was that the days of doctors being purely clinical is over! If you want to be a consultant in any speciality in the future, you will need a basic underlying knowledge of management and leadership. Upcoming events from the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society: Wednesday 27th November LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Learning to Lead- Preparing the next generation of junior doctors for management’ By Mr Tim Smart, CEO Kings Hospital NHS Trust Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust If you would like to get in touch with the society or attend any of our events please do contact us by email or via our Facebook group. We look forward to hearing from you. https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
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Dr Mark Newbold “Why Should Doctors Get Involved in Management – Understanding the Problems” - Birmingham Medical Leadership Society Lecture 3

The Birmingham Student’s Medical Leadership Society (MLS) held it’s third and final lecture of 2013 on Thursday December 5th. The final lecture was given by Dr Mark Newbold CEO of the Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust and was a particularly enlightening end to our autumn lecture series on why healthcare professionals should become involved in management and leadership. In contrast to the previous talk by Mr Tim Smart this lecture did not focus on why doctors would be suitable for management roles but rather on why clinical leadership is absolutely necessary to tackle the fundamental problems in our hospitals today. Once again, the Birmingham MLS heartily thanks Dr Newbold for giving up his valuable time to speak to us and we must also thank Michelle and Angie for video recording this event as well. Fingers crossed, the recordings of both of our last events should be available fairly shortly. The lecture began with a brief career history of why and how Dr Newbold became involved in hospital management, from front line doctor, to department lead and on to chief exec of a major NHS foundation trust. The second part of the lecture was a brief history of the recent NHS beginning with the Labour years. Between 1997 and 2010 NHS funding increased enormously, which was a good thing. Targets increased proportionally with the funding, not necessarily a good thing. Expectations to meet the targets at all costs and punishments for failure also increased, not a good thing. Focus became diverted from providing the best possible care to ensuring that the hospital didn’t go bankrupt from failing to hit it’s targets. The “budget culture” was an unintended consequence of overzealous central target setting. This system did have some major successes, such as overall reduced waiting times and new specialist urgent cancer referral pathways. However, these successes did not necessarily transform into better patient care or higher patient satisfaction. This came to ahead as well all know with the Mid-Staffs Enquiry, the Francis report and the Keogh review. The recent NHS reforms have tried to change the NHS management culture away from target driven accounting and more towards affordable, yet excellent patient care – a “quality culture”. The NHS structural reforms have been well meaning but messy and complicated. The NHS culture change has begun, but trying to change something as huge as the NHS is like trying to steer an oil tanker, it takes time for the tiniest change in direction to be noticed. Add to this list of changes, an ever ageing population, an ever growing population, an increasingly chronically ill, co-morbid population and a relative freeze in budget and you can start to see why NHS managers are having such a tough time at the moment. How can NHS managers adopt this culture? Put their priorities in order. Quality care + Patient satisfaction > Waiting lists > Budgets Engage with the public in a more meaningful way. Have a social media presence so that you, your hospital and its staff are more than just a faceless organisation. Have a twitter account and write blogs about your challenges and successes. This will increase patient satisfaction with your hospital. Ask for and listen to patient reviews regularly. Make sure these reviews are public and this will help ensure that any changes made are recognised. Better articulate why you are changing a service, e.g. you are not shutting a local A/E to save money but to save lives! Specialist centres have been shown to have better patient outcomes than smaller, less specialised centres. The London stroke service reforms are an excellent example of this principle. Realise that a budget is a constraint, not an aim! Create a dialogue with doctors about which targets are important and why they are important. If doctors don’t agree with the targets then they will not try to improve the measures. For example, the A/E 4 hour waiting time target annoys a lot of healthcare professionals, who see it as a criticism of their work. However, this target is in fact not a measure of A/E efficiency but actually a measure of FLOW through the entire hospital. If the 4h target is missed then there is a problem within the hospital system as a whole and the doctors needed to be aware that their service is reaching capacity and that this may affect their practice. They should also consider why the 4h target was missed and what can they do to increase the patient flow through the hospital – are they needed in an understaffed department? The essence of this part of the lecture can be summarised by saying that “poor hospital performance has consequences for that hospital and its staff, these consequences affect clinical care and therefore, healthcare professionals need to care about the bigger picture otherwise it will affect frontline care”. The next part of the talk went on to outline some of the recent problems that Dr Newbold has been made aware of and how this affects his hospitals performance. 35% of patients who present to the A/E department have at least 1 chronic condition. 12% of patients are re-admitted within 30 days. Did they receive suboptimal care the first time? Patients who are re-admitted have a far higher mortality rate than other patients. Once, a patient has been in hospital for longer than 5 days their mortality rate begins to rise drastically. Being in a hospital is bad for your health and patients are often not discharged as soon as they should be. A hospital of 1500 people needs to discharge over 200 patients a day just to maintain its flow of patients. If this discharge rate decreases then the pressure on the system increases and beds are no longer available, which starts to decrease the services a hospital can provide, such as elective operations. Hospitals tend to be managed on 4 layers of alert. When the hospital is on top alert i.e. the most under pressure, mortality rates can be up to 8% higher than when the hospital is at its least pressured. By not discharging patients promptly, doctors are increasing the pressure on the system as a whole with awful unintended consequences for the patients. By admitting patients to the wards, who do not necessarily require in-patient care, doctors are also increasing the pressure on the system. Bed blocking has consequences for the patients, not just the budgets. The list above demonstrates how unintended consequences of frontline staff decisions affect patient outcomes. That is why it is critical that frontline staff are involved with helping to improve some of these problems. Does that patient really need to be admitted to an already full hospital? Does that patient really need to stay on the ward until Friday? Did that man with an exacerbation of asthma get the best acute treatment and has a plan been made for his long term management that will decrease the chance of him re-admitting? Healthcare staff can help by adjusting their practice to the situation and by helping to change the systems overall, so that the above consequences are less likely to occur. This part of the lecture was really quite sobering. It spelled out some hard facts about how such a complex system as a hospital operates. But more importantly it helped clarify just what needs to be done in the future to make hospital care the best it can be. Dr Newbold quoted the RCP report “Hospitals are not the problem, they have a problem” to highlight his believe that in the future the health service needs to change to be less focussed on acute crises and more focussed on exacerbation prevention. Hospitals should be a last resort, not a first choice. Hospitals themselves need to change how they deliver care. NHS staff need to explore ways of providing their services in an ambulatory fashion, so that patients don’t need to stay on the wards for any pre-longed period of time but come and go as quickly as possible. This will involve a major shake up in how hospital trusts fund care. They will need to increase their funding for the provision of more services at home. They need to get their employs out of the hospital and into the community. They need to work more closely with GP’s and with local social services. As the previous Chief Medical Officer said “Good Health is about team work”. Only when GP’s, community staff, hospital staff and social services work as a team will patient care really improve. At the present The University of Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society is in contact with the FMLM and other similar groups at the Universities of Bristol, Barts and Oxford. We are looking to get in contact with every other society in the country. If you are a new or old MLS then please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you and are happy to help your societies in any way we can – we would also love to attend your events so please do send us an invite. Email us at med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @UoBMedLeaders Find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Come along to our up coming events… Wednesday 22nd January 2014 LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Has the NHS lost the ability to care?’ – responding to the Mid Staffs inquiry’ By Prof Jon Glasby, Director of the Health Services Management Centre , UoB Thursday 20th February LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Reforming the West Midlands Major Trauma Care” By Sir Prof Keith Porter, Professor of Traumatology, UHB Saturday 8th March WF15 Medical School, 1pm “Applying the Theory of Constraints to Healthcare” By Mr A Dinham and J Nieboer ,QFI Consulting  
jacob matthews
over 7 years ago
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Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine

The purpose of the trauma team is to provide advanced simultaneous care from relevant specialists to the seriously injured trauma patient. When functioning well, the outcome of the trauma team performance should be greater than the sum of its parts. Trauma teams have been shown to reduce the time taken for resuscitation, as well as time to CT scan, to emergency department discharge and to the operating room. These benefits are demonstrated by improved survival rates, particularly for the most severely injured patients, both within and outside of dedicated trauma centres. In order to ensure the best possible performance of the team, the leadership skills of the trauma team leader are essential and their non-technical skills have been shown to be particularly important. Team performance can be enhanced through a process of audit and assessment of the workings of the team and the evidence currently available suggests that this is best facilitated through the process of video review of the trauma resuscitation. The use of human patient simulators to train and assess trauma teams is becoming more commonplace and this technique offers a safe environment for the future education of trauma team staff.  
sjtrem.com
over 5 years ago
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Partnership for Leadership in Practice

South East Coast Postgraduate Deanery for Kent, Surrey and Sussex Partnership for Leadership in Practice Partnership for Leadership in Practice: Deanery, LEP a…  
Zoe Playdon
over 11 years ago
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Reinventing specialty training of physicians? Principles and challenges

In a world undergoing constant change, in the era of globalisation, the training of medical professionals should be under constant review so that it can be tailored to meet the needs of this society in transition. This is all the more true at times of economic uncertainty, such as the current conditions, which have a direct impact on health services. Professionals need new Competencies for new times. Over the last decade initiatives have emerged in various Anglo- Saxon countries which have defined a framework of basic Competencies that all medical specialists should demonstrate in their professional practice. In addition to this, we must respond to the creation of the European Higher Education Area which has implications for specialised training. In Spain, training for medical specialists was in need of an overhaul and the recently passed law (Real Decreto 183/2008) will allow us to move forward and implement, in medical education, initiatives and innovations required in our medical centres, to respond to the new society and bring us in line with international professional education and practice. The way forward is a Competencybased model for medical education with assessment of these Competencies using simple instruments, validated and accepted by all the stakeholders. The institutions involved (hospitals, medical centres and other health care services) should trial different approaches within the general framework established by the current legislation and be conscious of the duty they have to society as accredited training organisations. Accordingly, they should consolidate their teaching and learning structures and the various different educational roles (Director of Studies, Tutors, and other teaching positions), showing the leadership necessary to allow proper implementation of their training programmes. For this, the Spanish Autonomous Regions must develop their own legislation regulating Medical Specialty Training. So, medical professionals should receive training, based on ethical values, behaviours and attitudes that considers humanistic, scientific and technical factors, developing an understanding of the scientific method; ability to put it into practice; skills to manage complexity and uncertainty; a command of scientific, technical and IT terminology to facilitate independent learning; and a capacity for initiative and teamwork, as well as skills for dealing with people and for making an effective, democratic contribution both within health organisations and in the wider society. Key words: Postgraduate Medical Education. Competencybased Medical Education.  
Jesús Morán_Barrrios
over 8 years ago
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NHS London Flu Factsheet 2014

London region: Respiratory Clinical Leadership Group Flu vaccination protects you, your family and your patients - still time to make a difference. Introductio…  
Nicole Chalmers
about 7 years ago
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Blogs | Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management

The FMLM blog publishes original articles on a range of issues relating to medical leadership and management.  Our blog authors are FMLM members and invited guests from a variety of grades, specialties, backgrounds and geographical locations, each with a unique perspective on leadership and management issues. Please note: blog posts are moderated for abusive content. Views published in the blog are those of the authors, and do not necessarily represent the views of the FMLM.  
fmlm.ac.uk
about 7 years ago
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Leadership - an integral part of a career in healthcare | Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management

FMLM Midlands and East region and the Birmingham Medical Leadership Society would like to invide you to their free event 'Leadership - an integral part of a career in healthcare'. It starts at 10am and runs until 5pm on Saturday 26 April.  
fmlm.ac.uk
about 7 years ago
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University of Birmingham Medical Leadership Society

Society for individuals interested in medical leadership and management  
University of Birmingham Medical Leadership Society
about 7 years ago
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Surgeons' leadership in the operating room: an observational study

Am J Surg. 2012 Sep;204(3):347-54. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2011.03.009. Epub 2011 Dec 16. Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
about 7 years ago