New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
1
4

The missing data that cost $20bn

Marketing is what you do when your product is no good, said Edward Land, scientist and inventor of the Polaroid instant camera. The same notion filled Tom Jefferson’s head when he began to reappraise his initial conclusions about neuraminidase inhibitors and the risk of influenza complications and hospital admissions (doi:10.1136/bmj.g2227). Keiji Hayashi, a Japanese researcher, alerted him to the existence of unpublished trials, trials that were not included in his Cochrane review of 2006. From trusting the literature, researchers, and companies, Jefferson moved to a position of deep scepticism. Many trials were unpublished, data weren’t shared, and decisions on purchasing, stockpiling, and using the drugs were based on a slim and skewed representation of the total evidence base.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1ilnrlb?1444774017
6
131

Itraconazole Toxicity and Cardiac Health Problems

Itraconazole is an antifungal drug used widely to treat fungal infections and is active against Aspergillus, Candida and Cryptococcus. It is effective and now much cheaper as it has passed out of the period of time granted to its inventor to exclusively sell it - there are now several competing manufacturers. It seems to be an increasingly useful and used drug now it has become more accessible which is a good thing in the main but this makes it increasingly important that this drug is properly understood and its very severe potential side effects appreciated and guarded against. These are the warnings published by the World Health Organisation Risk of congestive heart failure The agency says that while the available evidence suggests that the risk of heart failure with short courses of itraconazole is low in healthy, young patients, prescribers should exercise caution when prescribing the drug to at-risk patients. Amendments to the product information of all itraconazole formulations have been made to reflect this information. Risk to pregnant women By April 2000 the UMC had received 43 case reports from 5 countries regarding the use of itraconazole by pregnant women. 25 of these pregnancies ended in embryonic or foetal death. The remaining 19 reports described a variety of congenital malformation or neonatal disorders. In the 38 reports in which the route of administration was specified the drug was taken orally. The data suggested that: inspite of the approved recommendations and warnings itraconazole is being taken by pregnant women for minor indications, reported human experience seems to lend support to the experimental evidence that itraconazole is teratogenic, there is a predominance of abortion, and more firm warnings may be needed in the product information.Although not apparent from the UMC reports, a further question of interest was if itraconazole might decrease the reliability of oral contraceptives and so lead to unintended exposure in pregnancy. Care thus needs to be taken about which patients are prescribed itraconazole, adequate monitoring needs to be put in place if needed and sufficient advice given with the drug to ensure the patient is aware of the risks involved and the signs & symptoms to look out for.  
Graham Atherton
over 5 years ago
%3fr=0
2
69

Doing more with less: own Pride and Joy.

“There is nothing new under the sun” - Ecclesiastes 1:4-11. If any of you have read one of my blogs before you will have realised that I am a huge fan of books. The blog I am writing today is also about a book, but more than that, it is about an idea. The idea is simple, practical and nothing especially new. It is an idea that many call common sense but few call common practice. It is an idea that has been used in every sort of organisation for over 20 years. It is an idea that needs to be applied on a greater scale to the health service. The idea is not new. How the book is written is not new. But how the book explains the idea and applies it to healthcare is new and it will change how you view the health service. It is a revolutionary book. The book is called “Pride and Joy” by Alex Knight view here. How I came to read this book is a classic story of a Brownian motion (a chance encounter), leading to an altered life trajectory. The summer before starting medical school I was working as a labourer cleaning out a chaps guttering. During a tea break in the hot summer sun he asked me what I was going to study at Uni. As soon as I said “Medicine”, he said “then you need to come see this”. He took me into his office and showed me a presentation he had given the year before about a hospital in Ireland. He was a management consultant and had been applying a management theory he had learned while working in industry. With his help the hospital had managed to reduce waiting times by a huge amount. The management theory he was applying is called "The Theory of Constraints" (TOC). I thought that his presentation was fascinating and I could not understand why it was not more widely applied. I went away and read the books he suggested and promised that I would stay in touch. Four years later and I had been exposed to enough of the clinical environment to realise that something needs to change in how the health service is run. To this end, a couple of colleagues and myself founded the Birmingham Medical Leadership society (BMLS) with help from the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management (FMLM). The aim of which is to help healthcare students and professionals understand the systems they are working in. The first thing I did after founding the society was contact that friendly management consultant and ask him for his advice on what we should cover. He immediately put me in contact with QFI consulting, @QFIConsulting. This small firm has been working with hospitals all over the world to implement this simple theory called the Theory of Constraints. They were absolutely fantastic and within 2 emails had promised to come to Birmingham to run a completely free workshop for our society’s members. The workshop was on March 8th at Birmingham Medical School. Through our society’s contacts we managed to encourage 15 local students to take a revision break to attend the workshop on a sunny Saturday. We were also able to find 11 local registrars/ consultants who wanted to improve their management knowledge. It just so happens that the chap leading this workshop was Mr Alex Knight. The workshop sparked all of our interests and when he mentioned that he had just written a book, pretty much the whole crowd asked for a copy. When I got my copy, I thought I would leave it to read for after my end of year exams. However, I got very bored a few days before the first written paper and needed a revision break – so I decided that reading a few pages here and there wouldn't hurt. Trouble was that this book was a page turner and I soon couldn't put it down. I won’t spoil the book for all of you out there, who I hope will read it. I shall just say that if you are interested in healthcare, training to work in healthcare, already work in healthcare or just want a riveting book to read by the pool then you really should read it. The basic premise is that healthcare is getting more expensive and yet there appears to be an increase in the number of healthcare crises'. So if more money isn't making healthcare better, then maybe it is time to try a different approach. “Marketing is what you do when your product is no good” – Edward Land, inventor of the Polaroid Camera. Mr Land was a wise man and I can happily say that I have no conflict of interest in writing this blog. I have not been promised anything in return for this glowing review. The only reason that I have written this is because I believe it is important for people to have a greater understanding of how the health service works and what we can do to make it even better! As a very junior healthcare professional, there is not much that we can do on a practical level but that does not mean we are impotent. We can still share best practice and show our enthusiasm for new approaches. Healthcare students and professionals, if you care about how your service works and you want to help make it better. Please find a copy of this book and read it. It won’t take you long and I promise that it will have an impact on you. NB - Note all of the folded down corners. These pages have something insightful that I want to read again... there are a lot of folded pages!  
jacob matthews
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
13

Student Inventors Tackle Elder Mobility Hurdles - Next Avenue

Young winners of this year's Stanford Longevity Design Challenge went straight to would-be users for inspiration.  
nextavenue.org
over 3 years ago
Preview
0
2

Genetic engineering pioneer urges caution on editing human genome

Jennifer A. Doudna, inventor of a new DNA-editing tool, and 17 other scientists and ethicists call for a worldwide moratorium on creating inheritable changes to the human genome.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
0
8

Could this ankle exoskeleton help stroke survivors with mobility problems?

Inventors have been trying - and failing - to boost walking efficiency using wearable contraptions for over 100 years. Now, a team believes they have finally cracked it.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
1
2

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (Swedish: Nobelpriset i fysiologi eller medicin), administered by the Nobel Foundation, is awarded once a year for outstanding discoveries in the fields of life sciences and medicine. It is one of five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, in his will. Nobel was personally interested in experimental physiology and wanted to establish a prize for progress through scientific discoveries in laboratories. The Nobel prize is presented to the recipient(s) at an annual ceremony on 10 December, the anniversary of Nobel's death, along with a diploma and a certificate for the monetary award. The front side of the medal provides the same profile of Alfred Nobel as depicted on the medals for Physics, Chemistry, and Literature; its reverse side is unique to this medal.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 2 years ago
Preview
1
2

B. F. Skinner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Burrhus Frederic Skinner (March 20, 1904 – August 18, 1990), commonly known as B. F. Skinner, was an American psychologist, behaviorist, author, inventor, and social philosopher.[2][3][4][5] He was the Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology at Harvard University from 1958 until his retirement in 1974.[6]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 2 years ago
Preview
1
1

Kōbō Abe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kōbō Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kōbō?), pseudonym of Kimifusa Abe (安部 公房, Abe Kimifusa?, March 7, 1924 – January 22, 1993), was a Japanese writer, playwright, photographer and inventor. Abe has been often compared to Franz Kafka and Alberto Moravia for his modernist sensibilities and his surreal, often nightmarish explorations of individuals in contemporary society.[2][3]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 2 years ago
Preview
1
2

William Stern (psychologist) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Stern (German: [ʃtɛɐ̯n]; 29 April 1871 – 27 March 1938), born Wilhelm Louis Stern,[1] was a German psychologist and philosopher noted as a pioneer in the field of the psychology of personality and intelligence. He was the inventor of the concept of the intelligence quotient, or IQ, later used by Lewis Terman and other researchers in the development of the first IQ tests, based on the work of Alfred Binet. He was the father of the German writer and philosopher Günther Anders. In 1897, Stern invented the tone variator, allowing him to research human perception of sound in an unprecedented way.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 2 years ago
Preview
0
0

Flat lens promises possible revolution in optics - BBC News

A flat lens made of paint whitener on a sliver of glass could revolutionise optics, its US inventors say.  
bbc.co.uk
over 2 years ago
Preview
0
0

Rapid HIV Tester Kit Wins European Award for Innovation

A blood diagnostic kit that can detect infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis B in less than two hours won a European Inventor Award on Thursday for its developer.  
medscape.com
over 2 years ago
Preview
1
0

Walter Kistler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Walter P. Kistler (1918 – November 2, 2015) was a physicist, inventor, and philanthropist, born in Biel, Switzerland. Kistler is a life member of the Swiss Physical Society and a member of AIAA and ISA, which presented him the Life Achievement Award in 2000. He held patents on more than 50 inventions in the scientific and industrial instrumentation fields, and had published a number of papers in scientific and trade journals.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 2 years ago
Preview
1
1

Edward de Bono - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edward de Bono (born 19 May 1933)[1] is a Maltese physician, psychologist, author, inventor and consultant. He originated the term lateral thinking, wrote the book Six Thinking Hats and is a proponent of the teaching of thinking as a subject in schools.[2]  
en.wikipedia.org
about 2 years ago
Preview
1
1

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gottfried Wilhelm (von) Leibniz (/ˈlaɪbnɪts/;[8] German: [ˈɡɔtfʁiːt ˈvɪlhɛlm fɔn ˈlaɪbnɪts][9] or [ˈlaɪpnɪts];[10] French: Godefroi Guillaume Leibnitz;[11] 1 July 1646 [O.S. 21 June] – November 14, 1716) was a German polymath and philosopher who occupies a prominent place in the history of mathematics and the history of philosophy, having developed differential and integral calculus independently of Isaac Newton.[12] Leibniz's notation has been widely used ever since it was published. It was only in the 20th century that his Law of Continuity and Transcendental Law of Homogeneity found mathematical implementation (by means of non-standard analysis). He became one of the most prolific inventors in the field of mechanical calculators. While working on adding automatic multiplication and division to Pascal's calculator, he was the first to describe a pinwheel calculator in 1685[13] and invented the Leibniz wheel, used in the arithmometer, the first mass-produced mechanical calculator. He also refined the binary number system, which is the foundation of virtually all digital computers.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 2 years ago
Preview
1
2

Ub Iwerks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ubbe Eert "Ub" Iwerks, A.S.C. (/ˈʌb ˈaɪwɜːrks/; March 24, 1901 – July 7, 1971) was an American animator, cartoonist, character designer, inventor, and special effects technician, who created Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and Mickey Mouse with Walt Disney. The works Iwerks produced alongside Disney went on to win numerous awards, including multiple Academy Awards.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 2 years ago