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The handy guide to anaemia

The handy guide comprises a series of 5 short videos explaining different aspects of anaemia. The videos show my hands displaying cardboard cut outs of pictures I drew to explain the story of anaemia, an idea which I thought might make the information more memorable for students.  
kate mccormick
about 8 years ago
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2103

Haematology Tutorial

Haematology tutorial covering key topics in haematology  
James Davis
almost 7 years ago
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Acute Myeloid and Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Well rounded, clear and concise look at acute leukaemia.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Haematology SBAs

Slideshow offering some SBAs in Haematology  
James Davis
almost 7 years ago
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An Introduction to Haematological Malignancies

A presentation covering the basics of the haematological malignancies; including the acute and chronic leukaemias, the myeloproliferative disorders, paraproteinaemias and myelofibrosis.  
Benjamii
over 6 years ago
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Iron Profile TIBC, Ferritin and Saturation

My notes on iron metabolism and diagnosis of diseases using iron profile.  
Sarosh Kamal
over 3 years ago
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An Overview of Hematopoiesis

Hematopoiesis is the process of creating new blood cells in the body. All blood cells start off as hematopoietic stem cells, and then specialize into myeloid cells or lymphoid cells (T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes).  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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Acid Base Balance and ABG Analysis Lecture

Acid Base balance and ABG analysis lecture overing Acidosis, Alkaline Condition and Effects of PH.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Septic shock - pathophysiology and symptoms

Learn about the pathophysiology of Sepsis and Septic Shock and the symptoms you need to look out for.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Transfusion medicine mindmap

all what you need to know about blood products and transfusion in one page!  
Mohammed AlShammari
over 3 years ago
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Immunodeficiency Disorders Slideshow

A detailed slideshow covering manifestations, symptoms and much more.  
slideshare.net
over 3 years ago
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Death by Powerpoint.

Introduction Computerised presentations are a part of every medical student's / junior doctor's life. Sometimes we give them, often we sleep through them and occasionally we even listen to them. They are the backbone of medical education besides traditional bed-side teaching, having rapidly replaced the now extinct OHR (Over Head Projector) acetate-sheet presentations of years gone-by. The problem is that Doctors and medical students often struggle with creating and presenting coherent slides. This is most probably due to the general apathy most have for actually talking in front of an audience, or because those asked to present are often taken unawares, and therefore have little time to prepare. In these times of avolition or last-minute hurriedness, people often reach out for the industry standard of presentation production: PowerPoint. PowerPoint is the most commonly used tool for making presentations because it is simple to use and comes with a whole load of free templates. Unfortunately, most of these templates look disgusting. If a template doesn't look disgusting, then it is most certainly overused and you run the risk of having a presentation that looks identical to the student before you at the weekly seminar teaching - a scenario that can be easily likened to turning up to a lecture wearing exactly the same clothes as another person in the room, which would just be awkward. Another problem with PowerPoint is the phenomenon of 'Death By Powerpoint,' which refers to the general boredom and apathy experienced by those who have received way too much information in way too short a space of time via a series of over-cramped, poorly stylised slides. But why on earth do you care? People should care about 'Death By Powerpoint' because if your presentations cause people to zone out, then you are not getting your message across. And if you aren't getting your message across then you. are. not. presenting. at. all. (take a moment to reflect on that particularly Zen statement). Let me explain using a metaphor, if I am a sales person and I present my talk with well-designed slides, in an enthusiastic and well-rehersed manner to an appropriate audience I will make more sales than if I present using poorly designed slides at the last minute. Similarly, in Medicine if I present well designed, aesthetic slides I am more likely to convey accurate information to my colleagues that may very well be retained and enjoyed by all involved. Of course, this blog assumes a degree of presentation-related Altruism. The recommendations I am about to make require you to 'step out of the mould' and say 'no' to poor presentations. They require you to forgive others for the presentations they have inflicted on you in the past. You will 'lead by example'. Unfortunately I am not capable (or qualified) to make you an excellent designer, nor can I give you the motivation to feel as passionately about design aesthetics as i do when all you've got to do is slam some slides together for your monthly journal club. But what I can do is present to you a series of resources that might tempt you away from the horrific PowerPoint templates that currently infest medical student seminars and young doctors presentations. If you really couldn't care less, then I suggest using Prezi, a website where you can make quite eccentric looking presentations rapidly and for free. The only problem is that Prezi became cliched even before its debut and you risk inflicting travel sickness on your poor audience, what with all the funky zooming in and out of slides that occurs during a typical Prezi presentation (you will know what I mean if you've ever seen one). So, without further ado, here are my top 5 tips for making your presentations look smoother and more polished... Irrespective of whether the contents of your talk are any good. Step One: Typography Get yourself a good font. Typography is really important, when you speak to someone you use a variety of tones and gestures to convey the meaning of the words you are using. Fonts are effectively the printed version of your tone and gestures. Good font choice can help give 'umph' to a particular point in your presentation and help give character to what you are saying. Of course, it's important to remain professional so 'Wingbats' might not be your first choice, but anything that you could envisage on a nice business card is probably a good shout. Fonts are usually something you have to pay for if you want anything beyond the set given to you when you download Microsoft Word (for example). However, there are whole hosts of free fonts available from sites like [dafont])(http://www.dafont.com). The key is to be willing to trawl through these sites to find fonts that are actually useful! Beware those fancy fonts unless you know your audience can take it! If you are stuck on choosing a font, which is a common complaint, then maybe this flow diagram will help! Oh yeah, and never ever use Comic Sans. Ever. Step Two: Colour A good font isn't going to get you very far on its own. You need a solid colour scheme to bring your presentation alive. It seems blunt to say, but some people are not very good at picking colours that go well with one another. This is well evidenced in PowerPoint presentations where the yellow-text-on-blue-background is far too common. I mean yeah, in theory blue and yellow 'compliment' each other, but thats where the relationship between blue and yellow should stay... in theory. Luckily there are some useful colour palette websites available out there, which will match colours for you... Step Three: Structure After you've picked a sensible font and a suitable colour scheme, it's time to think about the structure or layout of your slides. It's absolutely crucial that you avoid putting too much information on your slides even if you are giving an academic presentation. An overloaded slide is about as useful as a dead cat. At this point, some of you may be tempted to resort to those dodgy PowerPoint default templates but there is another way! There are sites out there that have some pretty fresh templates you can use and they are completely free! They are sure to add a bit of spice to your slide's aesthetic. There will probably be a separate tutorial on this in the future, but basic principles apply. As a general rule stick to Left Alignment *and avoid *Central Alignment like the plague. Step Four: Imagery Images help to spice up a presentation, but try and keep them related to the topic. Google Images is a great resource but remember that most images will be a low resolution and will be poorly suited to being shown blown up full-size on a presentation screen. Low resolution images are a presentation killer and should be avoided at all costs. For high-quality images try sites like Flikr or ShutterStock. Step Five: Consider Software The interface of Powerpoint does not lend itself well to having images dropped in and played with to make nice looking layouts. I would recommend Adobe Photoshop for this kind of work, but not everyone will have access to such expensive software. Cheap alternatives include Photoshop Elements amongst others. Once you have created slides in Photoshop it is quick and easy to save them as JPEG files and drag and drop them into PowePoint. Perhaps that can be a tutorial for another time... Step 5: Additional Stuff Presentations typically lack significance, structure, simplicity and rehearsal. Always check over your presentation and ask 'is this significant to my audience?' Always structure your presentation in a logical manner and (it is recommended you) include a contents slide and summary slide to tie things together. Keep your verbal commentary simple and keep the slides themselves even more simple than that. Simplicity is crucial. Once you have produced your beautiful slides with wonderful content you will want to practice them. Practice, Practice, Practice. Rehearsing even just once can make a good presentation even better. Conclusion: This blog entry has covered some basic points on how to improve your medical presentations and has given a series of useful online resources. Putting effort into designing a presentation takes time and motivation, for those without these vital ingredients we recommend Prezi (whilst it is still relatively new and fresh). Perhaps the rest of you will only use these tips for the occasional important presentation. However, I hope that soon after you start approaching presentations with a little more respect for their importance and potential, you too will find a desire to produce high-quality, aesthetically pleasing talks. LARF - Mood: damn tired and feeling guilty that I just wrote this blog instead of revising haematology notes. Follow me on Twitter. Follow the Occipital Designs original blog. Check out my Arterial Schematic.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 6 years ago
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New research helps explain why a deadly blood cancer often affects children with malaria | Newswire

In equatorial Africa, a region of the globe known as the “lymphoma belt,” children are ten times more likely than in other parts of the world to develop Burkitt’s lymphoma, a highly aggressive blood cancer that can be fatal if left untreated. That area is also plagued by high rates of malaria, and scientists have spent the last 50 years trying to understand how the two diseases are connected.  
newswire.rockefeller.edu
almost 4 years ago
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Easy Coagulation Cascade (1 of 2) - Simple & easy to remember

A free coagulation cascade study guide is available at http://coagulationcascade.blogspot.com I'm a med student at Midwestern University's Chicago College of...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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Easy Coagulation Cascade

A free coagulation cascade study guide is available at http://coagulationcascade.blogspot.com! I'm a med student at Midwestern University's Chicago College o...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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Introduction to the mean cell volume (MCV) - Full Blood Count Masterclass Series

his video introduces the principles of measuring the mean cell volume (MCV) of red blood cells (RBCs). This provides a foundation for understanding abnormalities in the MCV and interpreting the FBC.  
Vernon Louw
over 6 years ago
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Haematopoiesis - Blood Cell Formation

All blood cells develop from haemocytoblasts The process is called haematopoiesis (sometimes just haemopoiesis) Haemocytoblasts are also known as pluripotential stem cells. These cells can replicate themselves as well as differentiate into other cells, thus providing the constant supply of blood cells. The turnover of cells is very quick:  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Haematology - Red Blood Cells

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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Platelet clumping - Full Blood Count Masterclass series

Platelet clumping is an important cause of a falsely decreased platelet count and occurs in about one out of ten patients with a low platelet count or thrombocytopenia. what it is, what causes it and what the implications are for the patient. Every medical student and doctor should know and recognize this. Enjoy!  
Vernon Louw
over 6 years ago
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Pediatrics Hematology Tutorial

This excerpt is a lecture from our 2014 Pediatrics Board Review.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago