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6

Orbital Floor Fractures – Don't Forget the Bubbles

8 year old Albert was playing indoor cricket at school when he was struck in the face with the cricket bat.  Although he did not lose consciousness he is complaining of a severe headache and double vision. He has already vomited five times in the department.  
dontforgetthebubbles.com
about 5 years ago
Sinaiem dark
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my-head-hurts

35 y F presents to ED with sudden onset worst headache of life starting 3 hours ago.  Refractory to treatment with excedrin.  No history of Migraines.  Concern for SAH. What is your management algorithm to rule out SAH?  Do you CT/LP?  
sinaiem.org
about 5 years ago
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Oral ibuprofen for acute treatment of episodic tension-type headache in adults | Cochrane

Frequent episodic tension-type headache (TTH) means having between one and 14 headaches per month. The condition causes much disability, and stops people concentrating and working properly. When headaches occur the pain usually goes away over time.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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2

Clinical Case 118: Thinking outside the box - Broome Docs

headaches paediatrics diagnosis thinking  
broomedocs.com
about 5 years ago
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Interventions for idiopathic intracranial hypertension | Cochrane

Review question We attempted to find all of the published randomised controlled trials (RCT, a type of rigorous study that compares one treatment option against another) that investigated any treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in any patient group. We looked at a number of outcomes including reduction in vision, improvement of headache and quality of life.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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WHO | An emergency within an emergency: caring for Ebola survivors

New research shows Ebola survivors most commonly face severe joint pains, eye problems leading to loss of vision in some cases, severe fatigue, headaches, poor concentration, and mental health challenges after recovery from Ebola.  
who.int
about 5 years ago
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11

Headaches

Learn why and how headaches develop and how to correct the underlying problems properly to live a headache free life. At http://bergmanchiropractic.com and h...  
youtube.com
about 5 years ago
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An unusual cause of headache in pregnancy

A pregnant 35 year old woman with known migraines presented with severe headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an enlarged sella turcica containing a macroadenoma …  
feeds.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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9

Why Is This Hydrocephalus Patient Confused and Immobile?

Following ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for hydrocephalus, a patient awakes very confused and complaining of a headache, unable to walk. What's the cause?  
medscape.com
about 5 years ago
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1

Manipulation and mobilisation for neck disorders | Cochrane

This update assessed the effect of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared with a control or another treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without arm symptoms and headache at immediate- to long-term follow-up.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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An expanding intracerebral haematoma

A 44 year old man presented to the emergency department with a sudden onset headache. He had no medical history of note and took no drugs. Urgent computed tomography of the head was performed (fig 1⇓). A repeat scan (eight minutes later) was performed after administration of intravenous contrast (OptiRay) (fig 2⇓). Upon return from the radiology department, he developed left sided hemiplegia. His blood pressure was 179/90 mm Hg. After another 46 minutes, computed tomography (fig 3⇓) with angiography (not shown) was performed; no abnormal vessels were seen. Blood tests did not show an underlying coagulopathy. He subsequently deteriorated to localising to pain and making incomprehensible sounds to pain without opening his eyes (Glasgow coma score 8). His pupils remained equal and reactive to light.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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2

An expanding intracerebral haematoma

A 44 year old man presented to the emergency department with a sudden onset headache. He had no medical history of note and took no drugs. Urgent computed tomography of the head was performed (fig 1⇓). A repeat scan (eight minutes later) was performed after administration of intravenous contrast (OptiRay) (fig 2⇓). Upon return from the radiology department, he developed left sided hemiplegia. His blood pressure was 179/90 mm Hg. After another 46 minutes, computed tomography (fig 3⇓) with angiography (not shown) was performed; no abnormal vessels were seen. Blood tests did not show an underlying coagulopathy. He subsequently deteriorated to localising to pain and making incomprehensible sounds to pain without opening his eyes (Glasgow coma score 8). His pupils remained equal and reactive to light.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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0

An expanding intracerebral haematoma

A 44 year old man presented to the emergency department with a sudden onset headache. He had no medical history of note and took no drugs. Urgent computed tomography of the head was performed (fig 1⇓). A repeat scan (eight minutes later) was performed after administration of intravenous contrast (OptiRay) (fig 2⇓). Upon return from the radiology department, he developed left sided hemiplegia. His blood pressure was 179/90 mm Hg. After another 46 minutes, computed tomography (fig 3⇓) with angiography (not shown) was performed; no abnormal vessels were seen. Blood tests did not show an underlying coagulopathy. He subsequently deteriorated to localising to pain and making incomprehensible sounds to pain without opening his eyes (Glasgow coma score 8). His pupils remained equal and reactive to light.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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Can Headaches During Pregnancy Trigger Red Flags? CME/CE

: Approximately one-third of pregnant women receiving neurologic consultation for headache have secondary causes, particularly those without headache history and with seizures, hypertension, or fever.  
medscape.org
almost 5 years ago
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Evaluation of a ring enhancing lesion

A 49 year old previously healthy woman presented to her general practitioner with a two week history of progressive headaches, forgetfulness, and decreased visual acuity. She had no other symptoms or findings of note. On examination, she was oriented to person, location, and time. Her heart rate was 78 beats/min, respiratory rate was 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure was 116/78 mm Hg. She was afebrile and had no meningeal signs. Physical examination identified a right homonymous hemianopsia but no other neurological or cognitive deficits. There was no evidence of papilloedema. Her electrolytes, complete blood count, and C reactive protein concentration were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single ring enhancing lesion with irregular borders.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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Evaluation of a ring enhancing lesion

A 49 year old previously healthy woman presented to her general practitioner with a two week history of progressive headaches, forgetfulness, and decreased visual acuity. She had no other symptoms or findings of note. On examination, she was oriented to person, location, and time. Her heart rate was 78 beats/min, respiratory rate was 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure was 116/78 mm Hg. She was afebrile and had no meningeal signs. Physical examination identified a right homonymous hemianopsia but no other neurological or cognitive deficits. There was no evidence of papilloedema. Her electrolytes, complete blood count, and C reactive protein concentration were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single ring enhancing lesion with irregular borders.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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1

Evaluation of a ring enhancing lesion

A 49 year old previously healthy woman presented to her general practitioner with a two week history of progressive headaches, forgetfulness, and decreased visual acuity. She had no other symptoms or findings of note. On examination, she was oriented to person, location, and time. Her heart rate was 78 beats/min, respiratory rate was 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure was 116/78 mm Hg. She was afebrile and had no meningeal signs. Physical examination identified a right homonymous hemianopsia but no other neurological or cognitive deficits. There was no evidence of papilloedema. Her electrolytes, complete blood count, and C reactive protein concentration were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single ring enhancing lesion with irregular borders.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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1

Evaluation of a ring enhancing lesion

A 49 year old previously healthy woman presented to her general practitioner with a two week history of progressive headaches, forgetfulness, and decreased visual acuity. She had no other symptoms or findings of note. On examination, she was oriented to person, location, and time. Her heart rate was 78 beats/min, respiratory rate was 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure was 116/78 mm Hg. She was afebrile and had no meningeal signs. Physical examination identified a right homonymous hemianopsia but no other neurological or cognitive deficits. There was no evidence of papilloedema. Her electrolytes, complete blood count, and C reactive protein concentration were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a single ring enhancing lesion with irregular borders.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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Even a worm can turn

A previously fit and well 24 year old US born white man presented for evaluation of abdominal pain. He had felt tired for the past two days and had been experiencing headaches, subjective fevers, and diffuse abdominal pain. Despite this he had maintained a good appetite and his normal diet, which included eating sushi at least once a week. His symptoms improved greatly after he noted a tape-like object in his stool. He had travelled to California, …  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago