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Glomerulonephritis

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Glomerulonephritis (GN)

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Goodpasture’s syndrome (anti-GBM antibody disease)

  This is a rare, genetic, autoimmune condition characterised by a combination of glomerulonephritis with alveolar hemorrhage in the presence of circulating anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies.  Circulating anti-GBM antibodies bind to basement membranes in the kidneys and lungs, fix complement and trigger a cell-mediated inflammatory response, causing glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis.    Specific predisposing factors include the following: Association with HLA-DR2  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Pathology of Glomerulonephritis

Pathology of Glomerulonephritis.  
SlideShare
about 5 years ago
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Glomerulonephritis. Information on glomerulonephritis | Patient

Glomerulonephritis includes a range of immune-mediated disorders that cause inflammation within the glomerulus and other compartments of the kidney. [...  
Patient.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Glomerulonephritis - Renal Medicine | Fastbleep

Fastbleep offers the opportunity to support a growing social network of healthcare students and educators as they consider patient care, undertake professional development and share knowledge.  
fastbleep.com
over 4 years ago
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Renal MCQ

A 42 year old man develops a sore throat. He does not consult his GP but takes some over the counter painkillers and an anti-inflammatory. 1 week later he has a non itchy rash starting on his feet then spreading to his trunk. The rash has the appearance of tiny teardrops. He is correctly diagnosed with guttate psoriasis. The patient is put on penicillin orally 250mg QDS for 1 week. He then starts passing small volumes of urine. His urine is described as "orangey brown" . He continues taking a non steroidal anti inflammatory drug (ibuprofen 800mg TDS). What is the most likely explanation for this? a. Post infective glomerulonephritis b. Rheumatic fever c. Secondary to penicillin d. Interstitial nephritis secondary to anti inflammatory medication  
Af Del
over 5 years ago
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The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!? These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality. Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend: Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent. While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier. Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Sherwood – From cells to systems Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it. For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts. However: I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards! Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did. That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you. Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs. This is a book for any budding surgeon! Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder Macleod’s clinical examination Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf. I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice. Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder Oxford textbook of clinical pathology When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all. The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology. After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide. Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Medical Pharmacology at glance Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day. Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function. This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts! In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece! Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder. Anatomy colouring book This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all. While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery. Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it! Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!  
Benjamin Norton
over 6 years ago
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Glomerulonephritis with Dr. Caster

Dr. Caster is an Assistant Professor with the University of Louisville in the division of Nephrology. In this lecture she discusses glomerulonephritis. Her f...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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MyUSMLE CK: Goodpasture syndrome

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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MyUSMLE CK: Goodpasture syndrome - YouTube

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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Multidrug, multitarget regimen results in higher remission rates for lupus nephritis patients

A multidrug, multitarget regimen proves superior to intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) as induction therapy for lupus nephritis (LN), according to a randomized, controlled trial being...  
medicalnewstoday.com
about 4 years ago
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Immunosuppressive agents for treating IgA nephropathy | Cochrane

IgA nephropathy is a common kidney disease that often leads to decreased kidney function and may result ultimately in kidney failure for one-third of affected people. The cause of IgA nephropathy is not known, although most people with the disease have abnormalities in their immune system. We identified 32 studies enrolling 1781 patients that met our inclusion criteria. This review found that if people with IgA nephropathy receive immunosuppressive drugs, particularly steroids, they may be less likely to develop kidney failure needing dialysis or transplantation. Few studies were available and the harms of therapy are currently not well understood. Larger placebo-controlled studies are now needed to be certain about the benefits and hazards of steroids on outcomes in IgA nephropathy and to identify which specific patients might benefit most from the treatment.  
cochrane.org
almost 4 years ago
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Lupus Nephritis Affects One Third of Patients With Lupus

Patients with lupus who have nephritis had high rates of end-stage renal disease and death and a lower quality of life, a longitudinal study showed.  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Interventions for renal vasculitis in adults | Cochrane

Renal vasculitis presents as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis which is a form of kidney disease that causes damage to the small structures (glomeruli) inside the kidneys that help filter waste and fluids from blood to form urine. The disease leads to a rapid loss of kidney function. Standard suppression of the immune system with steroids and cyclophosphamide is recommended. The aim of this review was to evaluate the benefits and harms of any intervention for the treatment of renal vasculitis. Thirty one studies (2217 patients) were identified. Plasma exchange reduces the risk of end-stage kidney disease in patients presenting with severe acute kidney failure. The use of pulse cyclophosphamide results in good remission rates but there was an increased risk of relapse. Azathioprine is effective as maintenance therapy once remission has been achieved. Mycophenolate mofetil is equivalent for remission induction than cyclophosphamide. Mycophenolate mofetil has also been tested in maintenance treatment and was found to result in a higher rate of disease relapse. Initial data on rituximab showed equivalent effectiveness to cyclophosphamide. Methotrexate and leflunomide are useful in maintenance therapy but their relative effectiveness are not clearly defined. Treatment with co-trimoxazole may prevent respiratory infections and relapses but are unlikely to have a major impact on systemic relapses of vasculitis.  
cochrane.org
almost 4 years ago
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Intro to Renal Failure

Positive urine sediment and/or RBCs should always point you to intrinsic renal failure (ATN, AIN, glomerulonephritis), regardless of urine sodium and osmolal...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Rituximab Emerging as New Option for Membranous Nephropathy

The treatment of membranous nephropathy remains controversial, but new data suggest that adding rituximab to nonimmunosuppresive antiproteinuric therapy is an option.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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MRCPCH: Acute Post streptococcal Glomerulonephritis (APSGN) by MrcpchTeam

I have discussed only important points you need to know for MRCPCH examination, hope it will benefit you thank you. SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://bit.ly/161OmbF  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Favorable Long-Term Renal Graft Survival in Primary Glomerulonephritis

Patients with primary glomerulonephritis (GN) generally have favorable long-term kidney transplant outcomes, according to new findings.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago