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13
277

Vagus nerve

An edited version of my Friday Evening Discouse given to the Royal Institution on 11 April 2008. Abstract: The vagus nerves (cranial nerve X) connects our brainstem to the body, facilitating monitoring and control of many automatic functions; the vagus electrically links our gut, lungs and heart to the base of the brain in an evolutionarily-ancient circuit, similar between mammals and also seen in birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The vagus comprises a major part of the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system, contributing to the motor control of important physiological functions such as heart rate and gut motility. The vagus is also sensory, relaying protective visceral information leading to reflexes like cough and indication of lung volume. The vagus has been described as a neural component of the immune reflex. By monitoring changes in the level of control exerted by the vagus, apparent as beat by beat changes of heart rate, it is possible to indirectly view the effect of pharmaceuticals and disease on brainstem function and neural processes underlying consciousness. The paired vagus nerves of humans have different functions, and stimulation of the left vagus has been shown to be a therapeutic treatment for epilepsy, and may modulate the perception of pain.  
Chris Pomfrett
almost 10 years ago
5
2
48

Status epilepticus in children

<p><!--StartFragment--></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-CA">This podcast gives medical students an approach to managing status epilepticus in pediatric patients. It was written by Michelle Bischoff and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Michelle is a medical student at the University of Alberta and Dr. Lewis is a General Pediatrician and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Stollery Children&rsquo;s Hospital and University of Alberta.</span>&nbsp;These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content at <a href="http://www.pedscases.com/">www.pedscases.com</a>.</p <!--EndFragment-- <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 8 years ago
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2
115

Epilepsy slides

A lecture I gave as a medical student on the pathogenesis of Epilepsy and bits and pieces on pharmacology. I will add a voice- over if you enjoy the slides to make it even more helpful. Hope you enjoy this!  
BL MK
about 5 years ago
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0
124

Epilepsy

A teaching slide show on Epilepsy pathophysiology and some pharmacology. Hope it's useful  
Marinos Koulouroudias
about 5 years ago
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6
261

Epilepsy Tutorial

Overview of the different types and the classification of epilepsy.  
Sam Lang
almost 4 years ago
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0
3

Suspected epilepsy: when to warn

Medical Protection Society Website  
medicalprotection.org
over 4 years ago
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2
57

Epilepsy

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
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1
23

Migraine

To distinguish from a TIA: - TIA’s have sudden onset, with maximum deficits immediately. Headache is rare. In migraine, the deficits may occur gradually, and almost always accompanied by headache. In both cases aura may be present It can occur in recurrent episodes (similar to tension headache) or in one off, irregular instances. Incidence – 8-12%. M:F – 1:2    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
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1
15

Subdural Haemorrhage

A haemorrhage between the arachnoid and dura mater. It can be acute, chronic, or acute on chronic. Most cases are chronic, and occur in the elderly after mild trauma (e.g. a fall). Usually a venous bleed.   Epidemiology and aetiology Elderly Hypertension Falls (e.g. in epilepsy and alcohol abuse) Anticoagulant therapy   Pathology Vast majority due to trauma, but sometimes can be caused by ↑ICP and brain mets.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
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2
28

Febrile Convulsion

A seizure is a neurological event where there is a synchronous discharge of many neurons. Each individual has a ‘threshold’ at which their neurons will begin to do this. It is thought that this threshold is at least partly genetically determined. This threshold can be affected by: External stimulation – e.g. flashing lights Cerebral injury  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
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11
236

Seizure classifications, types for neuroscience pathology student: Tonic Clonic etc

Seizures include tonic clonic, abscence and status epileptics. Simple partial and complex partial as well.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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10
818

Pharmacology Mnemonic: Partial Seizures: Phenytoin, Carbamazepine, Lamotrigine, Topiramate

Simple and complex partial seizures can be treated with medical drugs.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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1
33

How to manage the first seizure in an adult

Stream How to manage the first seizure in an adult by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
11

First seizures in adults

In 85% of patients, the diagnosis comes from the history; blood tests, electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging are important for classification and risk prediction  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
10

Doctor is not to blame for baby left brain damaged 32 years ago, court finds

A High Court judge has ruled that a hospital doctor was not to blame for a brain injury in a newborn baby 32 years ago that left him with cerebral palsy as well as epilepsy and cognitive, behavioural, and physical problems.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago