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Foo20151013 2023 2iw10f?1444774140
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Medical students face new NHS entry exam

The Health Service Journal have announced this week that medical students could be given a license to practice medicine in the NHS as soon as they graduate. What do we know? The proposal comes from Health Education England. Students would qualify by taking an additional exam when applying for the Foundation Programme. The aim is to improve the standard of medics joining the NHS. Another driving force is to reduce the rising number of med students applying for the two-year Foundation Programme (currently the only way for junior doctors to achieve a full license to practice). Last year there were 297 more applicants than places. If approved the plan would require changes to the Medical Act. Statement from the BMA Dr Andrew Collier, Co-Chair of the BMA’s Junior Doctor Committee said: “We do not feel the case has yet been made for a wholesale change in foundation programme selection process, especially as the system was significantly overhauled and implemented only one year ago. There is little evidence that another new national exam over and above current medical school assessment methods will add any benefit either for graduating students or the NHS as a whole. It is also unlikely to solve the ongoing oversubscription to the foundation programme which will only be addressed by well thought out workforce planning.” Will it work? This proposal has certainly come as a surprise to me so soon after recent changes to the Foundation Programme selection process. I would love to know what you think about it. Do you agree with Dr Collier’s statement? If the plan goes ahead do you think it will be effective in achieving the desired outcomes? Please post your comments and thoughts. Nicole Read more: http://www.hsj.co.uk/news/exclusive-medical-students-face-new-nhs-entry-exam/5066640.article#.UrbyS2RdVaE  
Nicole Chalmers
about 7 years ago
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Dementia: A reflection from an Egyptian Perspective

Through different periods of the Egyptian history from Pharaonic, Greco-Roman, Coptic, Islamic and Modern Era; Egyptians tend to respect, appreciate and care for elderly. There is also a rich Eastern Christian tradition in respecting and taking care of old people that has continued since the first centuries of Christianity. Churches used to develop retirement homes served by monastic personnel and nurses. Egyptian culture traditionally linked some aspects of mental illnesses to sin, possession of evil, separation from the divine and it is usually associated with stigmatisation for all family members. However, forgetfulness with ageing was normalised. Until now, it seems that the difference between normal ageing and dementia is blurred for some people. Recently, the term 'Alzheimer' became popular, and some people use it as synonymous to forgetfulness. El-Islam, stated that some people erroneously pronounce it as 'Zeheimer' removing the 'Al' assuming it is the Arabic equivalent to the English 'the'. In 2010, a film was produced with the title 'Zeheimer' confirming the mispronunciation. Elderly face many health challenges which affect their quality of life. Dementia is one of these challenges as it is considered to be one of the disorders which attack elderly and affect their memory, mental abilities, independence, decision making and most cognitive functions. Therefore, the focus on dementia has increased around the world due to the rapid spread of the syndrome and the economical and psychosocial burden it cause for patients, families and communities. (Grossber and Kamat 2011, Alzheimer’s Association 2009, Woods et al. 2009). In recent years, the proportion of older people is increasing due to the improvement in health care and scientific development. The demographic transition with ageing of the population is a global phenomenon which may demand international, national, regional and local action. In Egypt the ageing population at the age of 65 and older are less than 5% of the Egyptian population (The World FactBook, 2012), yet, the World Health Organization (WHO) asserts that a demographic shift is going to happen as most of the rapid ageing population will transfer to the low and middle income countries in the near future (WHO, 2012). Egyptian statistics assert this shift. The Information Decision Support Center published the first comprehensive study of the elderly in Egypt in 2008. According to the report, in 1986, 5 percent of Egyptians were age 60 and older. In 2015, they will make up to 11 percent of the population and in 2050; over a fifth. Caring of older persons constitutes an increasing segment of the Egyptian labor market. However, nation wide statistics about number of dementia sufferers in Egypt may be unavailable but the previous demographic transition is expected to be accompanied by an increase in dementia patients in Egypt and will affect priorities of health care needs as well. The Egyptian society may need adequate preparation with regards to health insurance, accommodation and care homes for the upcoming ageing population (El-Katatney, 2009). Although the number of care home increased from 29 in 1986 to be around 140 home in 2009; it cannot serve more than 4000 elderly from a total of 5 million. Not every elderly will need a care home but the total numbers of homes around Egypt are serving less than 1% of the elderly population. These facts created a new situation of needs for care homes besides the older people who are requiring non-hospital health care facility for assisted living. The Egyptian traditions used to be strongly associated with the culture of extended family and caring for elderly as a family responsibility. Yet, in recent years changes of the economic conditions and factors as internal and external immigration may have affected negatively on elderly care within family boundaries. There is still the stigma of sending elderly to care homes. Some perceive it as a sign of intolerance of siblings towards their elderly parents but it is generally more accepted nowadays. Therefore, the need for care homes become a demand at this time in Egypt as a replacement of the traditional extended family when many older people nowadays either do not have the choice or the facilities to continue living with their families (El-Katatney 2009). Many families among the Egyptian society seem to have turned from holding back from the idea of transferring to a care home to gradual acceptance since elderly care homes are becoming more accepted than the past and constitutes a new concept of elderly care. Currently, many are thinking to run away from a lonely empty home in search of human company or respite care but numbers of geriatric homes are extremely lower than required and much more are still needed (Abdennour, 2010). Thus, it seems that more care homes may be needed in Egypt. Dementia patients are usually over 65, this is one of the factors that put them at high risk of exposure to different physical conditions related to frailty, old age, and altered cognitive functions. Additionally, around 50% of people with dementia suffers from other comorbidities which affect their health and increases hospital admissions (National Audit Office 2007). Therefore, it is expected that the possibility of doctors and nurses needing to provide care for dementia patients in various care settings is increasing (RCN 2010). Considering previous facts, we have an urgent need in Egypt to start awareness about normal and upnormal ageing and what is the meaning of dementia. Moreover, change of health policies and development of health services is required to be developed to match community needs. Another challenge is the very low number of psychiatric doctors and facilities since the current state of mental health can summarised as; one psychiatrist for every 67000 citizens and one psychiatric hospital bed for every 7000 citizens (Okasha, 2001). Finally the need to develop gerontologically informed assessment tools for dementia screening to be applied particularly in general hospitals (Armstrong and Mitchell 2008) would be very helpful for detecting dementia patients and develop better communication and planning of care for elderly. References: El Katateny, E. 2009. Same old, same old: In 2050, a fifth of Egyptians will be age 60 and older. How will the country accommodate its aging population?. Online available at: http://etharelkatatney.wordpress.com/category/egypt-today/page/3/ Fakhr-El Islam, M. 2008. Arab culture and mental health care. Transcultural Psychiatry, vol. 45, pp. 671-682 Ageing and care of the elderly. Conference of European churches. 2007. [online] available at: http://csc.ceceurope.org/fileadmin/filer/csc/Ethics_Biotechnology/AgeingandCareElderly.pdf World Health Organization. 2012 a. Ageing and life course: ageing Publications. [Online] available at : http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/en/ World Health Organization. 2012 b. Ageing and life course: interesting facts about ageing. [Online] available at: http://www.who.int/ageing/about/facts/en/index.html World Health Organization 2012 c. Dementia a public health priority. [online] available at: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2012/9789241564458_eng.pdf World Health Organization. 2012 d. Why focus on ageing and health, now?. Department of Health. 2009. Living well with dementia: a national dementia strategy. [Online] available at: http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_094058 Andrawes, G., O’Brien, L. and Wilkes, L. 2007. Mental illness and Egyptian families. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol.16, pp. 178-187 National Audit Office. 2007. Improving service and support for people with dementia. London. [online[ Available at: http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0607/support_for_people_with_dement.aspx Armstrong, J and Mitchell, E. 2008. Comprehensive nursing assessment in the care of older people. Nursing Older People, vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 36-40. Okasha, A. 2001. Egyptian contribution to the concept of mental health. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal,Vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 377-380. Woods, R., Bruce, E., Edwards, R., Hounsome, B., Keady, J., Moniz-Cook, E., Orrell, M. and Tussell, I. 2009. Reminiscence groups for people with dementia and their family carers: pragmatic eight-centre randomised trial of joint reminiscence and maintenance versus usual treatment: a protocol. Trials Journal: open access, Vol. 10, [online] available at: http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/10/1/64 Grossberg, G. and Kamat, S. 2011. Alzheimer’s: the latest assessment and treatment strategies. Jones and Bartlett, publisher: The United States of America. Alzheimer’s Association. 2009. 2009 Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, Volume 5, Issue 3. [online] Available at: http://www.alz.org/news_and_events_2009_facts_figures.asp Royal College of Nursing. 2010. Improving quality of care for people with dementia in general hospitals. London. National Audit Office. 2007. Improving service and support for people with dementia. London. [online[ Available at: http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/0607/support_for_people_with_dement.aspx Authors: Miss Amira El Baqary, Nursing Clinical instructor, The British University in Egypt 10009457@qmu.ac.uk Dr Emad Sidhom, MBBCh, ABPsych-Specialist in Old Age Psychiatry-Behman Hospital e.sidhom@behman.com  
Amira El Baqary
almost 7 years ago
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London classification of PIPJ fracture

London classification of PIPJ fracture  
Chris Oliver
almost 11 years ago
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Potential risk of carcinogens in e-cigarette vapour

The recent Public Health England evidence update on e-cigarettes is an important review by experts that will certainly guide public health policy in the UK.1 However, although the use of e-cigarettes is currently perceived to be less harmful than smoking, e-cigarettes …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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King's College London: Injection-free vaccination technique

Scientists at King's have demonstrated the ability to deliver a dried live vaccine to the skin without a traditional needle, and shown for the first time that this technique is powerful enough to enable specialised immune cells in the skin to kick-start the immunising properties of the vaccine. Dr Linda Klavinskis from the Peter Gorer Department of Immunobiology at King's explains the research behind the new technique and its wider potential. Read more about this technique on the King's College London website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/newsevents/news/newsrecords/2013/02-Feb/Injection-free-vaccination-technique.aspx.  
Nicole Chalmers
about 7 years ago
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Dr Mark Newbold: Why should doctors get involved in management?

Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of the Heart of England Foundation Trust, lectures as part of the Alumni Leadership Talks series.  
YouTube
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 4ktnps?1444774050
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Poo transplants

When is it medically advisable to eat some one else's poo? When you need a poo transplant. Poo transplants could be the solution to one of the biggest problems facing the NHS today- the bacterial infection Clostridium difficile. C.diff, as it's known to its friends, infects about 18,000 people in England and Wales every year and is involved in the deaths of about 2000 people. C.diff typically arises due to imbalances in the normal gut bacteria. The gut is like a city, a city with about 100 trillion bacterial residents happily munching away on a banquet of bowel contents. The average person has about 1000 different types of bacteria in their gut, and about 3% of healthy adults have C.diff in that mix. The C.diff doesn't cause them any problems because its numbers are kept in check by the other gut bacteria. However treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics such as clindamycin, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin and co-amoxiclav, can disrupt this happy community- killing off vast swathes of bacteria but crucially not the C.diff. Given free rein the C.diff multiplies rapidly and produces toxins which damage the gut. In some people this causes mild diarrhoea and abdominal pain, in others it can lead to torrential diarrhoea, perforation of the colon and death. Traditional treatment includes stopping any broad spectrum antibiotics and possibly prescribing antibiotics which target the C.diff such as metronidazole or vancomycin. However with antibiotic use comes the risk of resistance. Moreover our current approach isn't entirely effective and about 22% of patients treated suffer a recurrence. This can result in a cycle of illness and hospital admission which is costly to the patient and the hospital. So it's time to start thinking outside of the box. Cue the poo transplant. The thinking goes like this- if the cause of the problem is disruption to the normal community of gut bacteria, why not just pop those bacteria back in to crowd out the C.diff? Simples. Practically, the first step is to identify a donor, usually a close relative of the patient, and screen them for a range of infectious diseases and parasites. It's also advisable to make sure they haven't recently consumed anything the intended recipient is allergic to, before asking them to make their "donation". You then pop it in a household blender and blitz it down, adding saline or milk to achieve a slurry consistency. Next you need to strain your concoction to remove large materials- one medic in the UK uses coffee filters. Top tip. Then you're ready to administer it- about 25ml from above (e.g. via nasogastric tube), or 250ml from below. Now, its important to note that poo transplants are still an experimental treatment. To date only small case studies have been carried out, but with 200 total reported cases, an average cure rate of 96% and no serious adverse events reported to date, it's worth carrying out a large trial to assess it thoroughly. Poo transplants- arguably the ideal treatment for a cash strapped NHS. It's cheap, plentiful and it seems to work. Now to convince people to consume someone else's poo... Bottoms up! FYI: This was first posted on my own blog. Image Courtesy of Marcus007 at de.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  
Dr Catherine Carver
almost 8 years ago
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Bert Cohen Obituary: The first Nuffield research professor of dental science at the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

Professor of dental science who undertook research into head and neck cancers.  
theguardian.com
over 5 years ago
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'Super-gonorrhoea' outbreak in Leeds - BBC News

Highly drug-resistant gonorrhoea is spreading in the north of England with an outbreak centred in Leeds, health officials have confirmed.  
bbc.co.uk
over 5 years ago
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Two viewpoints on supporting clinical informatics in the 'new' NHS landscape

By Anne Cooper, Clinical informatics advisor, NHS England  
Speaker Deck
about 7 years ago
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Prescription charge to rise in England - BBC News

The price of NHS prescriptions is to rise by 20 pence in April and again next year.  
BBC News
almost 7 years ago
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Children admitted to adult mental health wards 'rising' - BBC News

The number of children with mental health problems being treated on adult wards in England is rising, according to new data.  
BBC News
almost 7 years ago
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Fewer hospital admissions for tooth decay in fluoridation areas – study

Public Health England says findings on children's dental health offer reassurance that water fluoridation is safe and effective  
the Guardian
almost 7 years ago
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Prostate Cancer

  By the age of 80, >80% of men have prostate cancer It is the second most common cancer in men, and the 4th most common cause of death for men in England and Wales. Rates of prostate cancer are particularly low in Asians, and particularly high in African Americans and Scandinavians. The tumours are adenomas and are usually located in the peripheral prostate.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
almost 7 years ago