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How to Study

Because of the snail's pace that education has developed at, most of us don't really know how to study because we've been told lectures and reading thousands of pages is the best way to go, and no one really wants to do that all day. That's not the only way to study. My first year of medical school... You know when you start the year so committed, then eventually you skip lectures once or twice... then you just binge on skipping? Kinda like breaking a diet "Two weeks in: oh I'll just have a bite of your mac n' cheese... oh is that cake? and doritos? and french fries? Give me all of it all at once." Anyways, when that happened in first year I started panicking after a while; but after studying with friends who had attended lectures, I found they were almost as clueless as I was. I'm not trying to say lectures are useless... What my fellow first years and I just didn't know was how to use the resources we had– whether we were keen beans or lazy pants, or somewhere in between. I still struggle with study habits, but I've formed some theories since and I'm going to share these with you. Reading While reading should not be the entire basis of your studying, it is the best place to start. Best to start with the most basic and detailed sources (ex.Tortora if it's a topic I'm new to, then Kumar and Clark, and Davidson's are where I usually start, but there are tons of good ones out there!). I do not feel the need to read every section of a chapter, it's up to the reader's discretion to decide what to read based on objectives. If you do not have time for detailed reading, there are some wonderful simplified books that will give you enough to get through exams (ICT and crash course do some great ones!). I start with this if exams are a month or less away. Later, it's good to go through books that provide a summarized overview of things, to make sure you've covered all bases (ex. Flesh and Bones, the 'Rapid ______" series, oxford clinical handbook, etc.). These are also good if you have one very specific question about a subject. Video Tutorials**** After all that reading, you want the most laid back studying you can find. This is where Meducation and Youtube become your best friend. (I can post a list of my favourite channels if anyone is interested).I always email these people to thank them. I know from the nice people that run this website that it takes a tremendous amount of effort and a lot of the time and it's just us struggling students who have much to gain. Everyone should use video tutorials. It doesn't matter if you're all Hermione with your books; every single person can benefit from them, especially for osce where no book can fully portray what you're supposed to do/see/hear during examinations. Some youtube channels I like https://www.youtube.com/user/TheAnatomyZone https://www.youtube.com/user/ECGZone https://www.youtube.com/user/MEDCRAMvideos https://www.youtube.com/user/awolfnp https://www.youtube.com/user/harpinmartin https://www.youtube.com/user/RadiologyChannel Lectures We're all thinking it, lectures can be boring. Especially when the speaker has text vomited all over their slides (seriously, If I can't read it from the back of the lecture hall, there's too much!. It's even worse when they're just reading everything to you, and you're frantically trying to write everything down. Here's the thing, you're not supposed to write everything down. If you can print the slides beforehand or access them on your laptop/ipad/whatever you use and follow along, do that. You're meant to listen, nod along thinking (oh yes I remember this or oooh that's what happens? or Oh I never came across that particular fact, interesting!). It's also meant to be a chance for you to discuss interesting cases from the a doctor's experiences. If you're lucky to have really interactive lecturers, interact! Don't be shy! Even if you make a fool of yourself, you're more likely to remember what you learned better. If you happen to be in a lecture you're completely unprepared for (basically 70% of the time?). Think of it as "throwing everything at a wall and hoping something sticks." Pull up the slides on your smart phone if you have one, only take notes on interesting or useful things you hear the speaker say. If all else fails, these lectures where tell you what topics to go home and read about. Tutorials My university has gradually increased its use of tutorials, and I couldn't be happier. Make the most out of these because they are a gift. Having the focused attention of a knowledgeable doctor or professor in a small group for a prolonged period of time is hard to lock down during hospital hours. Ask lots of questions, raise topics you're having trouble understanding, this is your protected time. Discussions In group study activities, this is particularly hard to make the most of when everyone in your group varies in studying progression, but even so, it can be beneficial. Other people's strengths might be your weaknesses and vise versa– and it's always helpful to hear an explanation about something from someone at your level, because they will neither under or over estimate you, and they will not get offended when you tell them "ok I get it that's enough." Myself and 3 of my medic friends would meet once a week the month or two leading up to exams at one of our houses to go through OSCE stations and concepts we didn't understand (food helps too). Besides peer discussions, you should take advantage of discussions with doctors. If the doctor is willing to give you their time, use it well. Practice Questions I am a practice question book hoarder. Practice questions book not only test and reaffirm your knowledge, which is often hard to find if your exams are cumulative and you have little to no quizes/tests. They also have concise, useful explanations at the back and, they tell you where the gaps in your studying are. For my neuro rotation, the doctor giving the first and last lecture gave us a quiz, it was perfect for monitoring our progress, and the same technique can be used in your studies. Practical Clinical Experiences If you freeze up during exams and blank out, and suddenly the only forms of text floating around your brain are Taylor Swift lyrics, these are bound to come to your rescue! "Learn by doing." Take as many histories as you can, do as many clinical exams in hospital, and on your friends to practice, as you can, see and DO as many clinical procedures as you can; these are all easy and usually enjoyable forms of studying. Teaching Have you ever had an experience where one of your peers asks you about something and you give them a fairly good explanation then you think to yourself "Oh wow, I had no idea that was actually in there. High five me." If there is ever an opportunity to teach students in the years below you or fellow students in your year, do it! It will force you to form a simplified/accurate explanation; and once you've taught others, it is sure to stick in your head. Even if it's something you don't really know about, committing yourself to teaching others something forces you to find all the necessary information. Sometimes if there's a bunch of topics that nobody in my study group wants to do, we each choose one, go home and research it, and explain it to each other to save time. If you're doing this for a presentation, make handouts, diagrams or anything else that can be used as an aid.  
Mary
almost 4 years ago
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6
171

An eye on optic nerve swelling - Diets USA Magazine

Optic neuritis is swelling and inflammation of the optic nerve which may result in dull pain behind the eye, and cause visual impairments such as blurry and distorted vision as well as “blind spots,” and/or “flashing lights, which may become more apparent over the course of several hours, or days.  
diets-usa.com
almost 2 years ago
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3
117

The (Peninsula) medical student's guide to healthy eating

I am a 4th year medical student, about to go into my final year and I created a healthy eating booklet directed at medical students as part of a Special Study Unit module. In the title of the booklet I included Peninsula medical school in the title to make it more appealing to the medical students in my university. However, all the information provided in the booklet is relevant to all medical students and even to non-medical students. Students are notoriously popular for having unhealthy diets during university life. Some of the reasons for this are the assumptions that healthy meals are more expensive to prepare, take longer to cook and require a greater deal of expertise than the average microwaveable meal Also the transition from living at home where meals are provided to having to fend for themselves especially for freshers can be one of the barriers to adopting a healthy lifestyle for students This booklet provides easy to follow tips on healthy eating and provides practical advice for cooking meals that are both healthy and cheap! The information is also presented in a style that's easy and interesting to read The booklet was created with the help of expert advice from a dietician at the Royal Devon and Exeter hospital, web based resources such as the NHS choices website and food leaflets from reputable organisations.  
Dolapo Thompson
over 5 years ago
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1
37

Rationally Coping With High Blood Pressure or Hypertension

Rationally Coping, High Blood Pressure, Multifaceted Menace, Hypertension, Silent Killer, HBP, Blood Pressure, BP, Lifestyle Changes, DASH, medicines  
adidarwinian
almost 3 years ago
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1
75

CHOLESTEROL & STEROID HORMONES by Professor Fink

Professor Fink first describes the molecular structure of steroids, the sources of Cholesterol in our diet, and the mechanism of action of Lipitor (& other "...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
Www.bmj
1
31

Drugs for neuropathic pain

The patient is a 63 year old freelance editor with type 2 diabetes diagnosed about five years ago that is relatively well controlled with insulin. He has early signs of retinopathy, with normal kidney function and electrocardiogram. Lipid values are normal with diet and atorvastatin 20 mg/day. He developed autonomic and peripheral neuropathy a few months ago, and now experiences postural hypotension and burning pain and clumsiness in his feet. His pain makes concentration and falling asleep difficult. He asks his general practitioner for painkillers to help him continue working.  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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3
53

The (Peninsula) medical student's guide to healthy eating

I am a 4th year medical student about to go into my final year and I created a healthy eating booklet directed at medical students as part of a Special Study Unit module. I included Peninsula medical school in the title of the booklet to make it more appealing to the medical students in my university. However, all the information provided in the booklet is relevant to all medical students and even to non-medical students. Students are notoriously popular for having unhealthy diets during university life. Some of the reasons for this are the assumptions that healthy meals are more expensive to prepare, take longer to cook and require a greater deal of expertise than the average microwaveable meal Also the transition from living at home where meals are provided to having to fend for themselves especially for freshers can be one of the barriers to adopting a healthy lifestyle for students This booklet provides easy to follow tips on healthy eating and provides practical advice for cooking meals that are both healthy and cheap! The information is also presented in a style that's easy and interesting to read The booklet was created with the help of expert advice from a dietician at the Royal Devon and Exeter hospital, web based resources such as the NHS choices website and food leaflets from reputable organisations.  
Dolapo Thompson
over 5 years ago
1
3
86

Metabolism: Starvation versus Stress

<p>Not feeding an injured or ill patient is not that same as a normal individual who is fasting.&nbsp;&nbsp; A pound of weight loss in the stress patient is significantly different than a pound of weight loss in someone on a diet.&nbsp;&nbsp;A basic understanding of stress metabolism is needed prior to a discussion of nutrition.&nbsp; </p>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 7 years ago
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0
7

Starch

Starch is a major source of energy for the diet. Starch is made up of glucose molecules linked together forming linear chains and also branching chains. Thes...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
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1
27

Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet & Treatment. Information resource | Patient

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic disease. Early diagnosis of RA and effective treatment with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Find out arthritis diets rheumatoid arthritis treatment.  
Patient.co.uk
over 2 years ago
9c2acd4690f2a59636fb7944b191e5aa
6
142

'THE F***-IT BUTTON'

It is Julian Bagginis' book, 'The Virtues of the Table: How to Eat and Think', that is fuelling me to write. I am particularly drawn to the chapter 'Willpower and Weight-loss' and would like to dedicate my first blog-entry to the ‘F**** -it-button’; the antithesis of willpower and thus.. weightloss. The ‘F***-it button’ is a useful concept for any -visually minded- [medical] student that in an attempt to lead the perfect [medic] lifestyle of ‘work hard-play hard' (whilst focusing on eating that all-important 'balanced diet' and exercising regularly)... ... ends up ‘working hard but playing harder', finds themselves eating the leftover cake in the nurses’ room (in order to gain that much-needed energy to sit in a clinic), and ditches the gym in favour of Facebook. In sum, the ‘F***-it button’ is that imaginary ‘button’ –definitely red in colour- that is available for any individual to press at any time, BUT is only pressed on occasion, for which there is usually a 'trigger' (an emotion or event that 'forces' you to do it). Once pressed, willpower and self-control are fully deactivated. The individual is free to do as they will. As you can imagine, the ‘F***-it button’ can be applied to anything... However, for me, this button is most often activated when trying to be 'healthy' and lead that balanced lifestyle. In this context, ‘F***-it button' 'initiation’ does not mean the breakfast that when portioning a bowl of cereal, a handful of flakes is ‘allowed’ to reach the mouth before the bowl... We are talking about total and utter blowout. Examples include: Having THE healthiest day EVER- planned to perfection- and then rewarding oneself with a night in a cocktail bar or a ‘few’ beers to celebrate the ‘day of healthiness’. (Usually on a Sunday) Finishing the week’s worth of ‘healthy’ food you stocked up to eat that week, you get a lil bit peckish at about 5p.m, about the time Sainsbury’s closes, and low and behold, you find yourself entering a housemate’s (sorry!) cupboard and demolishing their chocolate biscuits… the ‘walk of shame’ in the form of a ‘replacement trip’ to Sainsbury’s follows the next day, or if Sainsbury’s is open, promptly. That day when you are absolutely ravenous at 10.30am, lunch is too far away but you will not survive the morning… the only option is a chocolate bar or other high calorie snack… lunchtime comes but you are not hungry due to that cheeky snack BUT by mid-afternoon- maybe just as you are about to clerk a patient- you are ravenous, and a trip to the nurse’s room for a cake ‘to keep you going’ is inevitable. In all three cases, by this time you may as well give up completely, throw off all restrictions and eat whatever you like for at least the next week… you will eat everything and anything that comes to your mind, and it will involve numerous visits to the ‘chocolate shop’ (provided the cravings come before 11pm).* The ‘F***-it button’ has been pressed. In a way, I do love the ‘F***-it’ button conception; it allows a period of freedom to indulge, in a mood dependent fashion, in what you want, when you want to. However, it is very much a love-hate relationship.. eating the nurses cake is undoubtedly essential for those times when you need a ‘pick me up’ but regularly doing so leaves you unpopular, with tight trousers and intense feelings of guilt. The ‘hate’ part of the relationship is the reason I want to consider why it is that the‘F- it’ button exists. I have been informed by various ‘dieting’ websites that certain triggers, for example fatigue will trigger certain impulse responses, for example ‘F- it button’. This is a situation most of us can recognize… you really want to lose weight but faced with the temptation of the nurse’s cake on a day you feel tired, your desire for the cake, only needs to overrule your weight-loss resolution for a minute (or so) and all your good intentions are crushed, as the cake finds its way to your mouth. How is it that some of my friends – you know the type (my housemate)- can have one cookie of a packet of fifteen, and the other fourteen remain on their desk (or cupboard for that matter), next to where they are working, in full view, where they can smell, see and think about it, for at least half a year before they decide to have Biscuit Number Two, and ONLY Biscuit Number Two. This I just do not understand. My mind is put at ease- to an extent – by the knowledge gained from my new ‘bible’, ‘that experiments with toddlers show that even at a very young age, some people are able to resist or defer gratification better than others’. I was definitely NOT one of those toddlers… Baggini goes on to say that this matters more than just for weight loss: having good self-control is a very strong predictor of academic career and success… Hmm, I think we will leave it at that. *Chocolate shop as defined as the nearest newsagents or supermarket.  
Catherine Bruce
over 3 years ago
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1
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Pre-pregnancy diet 'permanently influences baby's DNA' - BBC News

A mother's diet can permanently alter the functioning of her child's genes, even before conception, say scientists.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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1
14

Olive oil and salad combined 'explain' Med diet success - BBC News

The combination of olive oil and leafy green salad or vegetables gives the Mediterranean diet its healthy edge, say scientists.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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1
1

Starch

Starch is a major source of energy for the diet. Starch is made up of glucose molecules linked together forming linear chains and also branching chains. Thes...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
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0
12

Risk For Two Birth Defects Affected By Overall Quality Of Pregnant Woman's Diet

The overall quality of a pregnant woman's diet is linked with risk for two types of serious birth defects, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 2 years ago
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1
117

Edible Glycerin Uses, Benefits, Safety, Side Effects

Glycerin (glycerine, glycerol) is a sugar alcohol (a carbohydrate) used as a food additive. Glycerin syrup is used as a sweetener.  
nutrientsreview.com
about 2 years ago
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1
10

High-fibre diet 'benefits heart attack patients' - BBC News

If you have had a heart attack, eat plenty of fibre because it may improve your long-term chances of recovery, say researchers.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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1
2

Do Diet Foods Make You Fat? - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 5th Feb 2012 - Do Diet Foods Make You Fat?  
thenakedscientists.com
over 3 years ago
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1
4

WHO: Daily sugar intake 'should be halved' - BBC News

People will be advised to halve the amount of sugar in their diet, under new guidance from the World Health Organization.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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1
10

High-fat diet and gut microbiota

Stream High-fat diet and gut microbiota by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 2 years ago