New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Foo20151013 2023 qbpcwm?1444774114
2
157

"It’s not art, it’s not science – it’s the same thing" Dr. Mangione

Our most popular tweet this week comes from Forbes contributor, Robert Glatter. Robert discusses how medicine and art are a complementary skill set. EMBED TWEET: https://twitter.com/Meducation/status/394399394210263040 As universities look to improve the selection process for medical school, they are giving increased focus to natural traits that encompass the ideal candidate. In his article Robert looks at how typically “right brain” characteristics, such as artistic flair, are highly valued selection criteria and in some cases rank more favourably than “left brain” thinking. Dr. Mangione, a master of artistic expression and physical diagnosis, agrees that medical students with creative thinking as part of their skillset are likely to excel. Do you agree that this is an important factor to consider when predicting an individual's potential for success in medicine? If not, what traits do you believe are important? The full article can be seen here - it's a very thought provoking read. Nicole  
Nicole Chalmers
over 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xta4hx?1444774129
2
345

Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) Annual Event

The Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) held its second annual student research symposium on the 13th of November 2013 at the University Hospital of Wales. Medical students were invited to submit posters and oral presentations for the symposium. The event also launched this year’s INSPIRE program, a joint effort between Cardiff, Bristol, Exeter and Plymouth to give students connections to research groups through taster days and summer research programs. CUReS is a research society for medical students in Cardiff. All events and projects are completely free and available to all years. The research society has a particular focus on developing close bonds between researchers and students. In addition to INSPIRE, the society also releases a yearly list of summer research projects where medical students can find researchers interested in hosting projects over the summer. The purpose of the conference was to mark the launch of the INSPIRE taster days and display some of the impressive work that has been accomplished from the taster sessions and the funded summer projects. The symposium aims to give Cardiff medical students valuable experience in presenting their research and to motivate students interested in pursuing an academic career. CUReS president Huw Davies gave the opening speech, while INSPIRE lead Colin Dayan introduced the INSPIRE program. Previous INSPIRE students gave talks on their research and experiences gained from the program. Three successful applicants were invited to give oral presentations that were judged by the Cardiff Dean of Medicine Professor Paul Morgan, Professor Colin Dayan and Professor Julian Sampson, who also gave the keynote speech on his research. The symposium was a great success thanks to the enthusiastic medical students who presented posters and gave oral presentations on their research. First prize for an oral presentation was awarded to Georgiana Samoila for her work on Histological Diagnosis of Lung and Pleural Malignancies, while Lisa Roberts and Jason Chai were awarded runner-ups. The award for best poster was given to Thomas Lemon. Two further awards sponsored by Meducation, assessed by Peter Winter, were given to George Kimpton and Ryan Preece for their poster presentations. There was also a Meducation stall and the Cardiff University Research Society greatly appreciates the support. To get in touch with the CUReS, please email cures@cardiff.ac.uk or visit our website at www.cu-res.co.uk for more information. Written by Robert Lundin  
Nicole Chalmers
over 7 years ago
%3fr=0
2
138

A Modest Man

The registrar's face was taking on a testy look. So enduring was the silence our furtive glances had developed a nystagmic quality. “Galactosaemia” came her peremptory reply. Right on queue the disjointed chorus of ahs and head nods did little to hide our mental whiteboard of differentials being wiped clean. At the time conjugated bilirubinaemia in children only meant one thing: biliary atresia. A fair assumption; we were sitting in one of three specialist centres in the country equipped to treat these patients. Ironically the condition has become the unwieldy yardstick I now measure the incidence of paediatric disease. Biliary atresia is the most common surgical cause of neonatal jaundice with a reported incidence of 1 in 14-16ooo live births in the West. It is described as a progressive inflammatory obliteration of the extrahapatic bile duct. And Dr Charles West, the founder of Great Ormond Street Hospital, offers an eloquent description of the presenting triad of prolonged jaundice, pale acholic stools and dark yellow urine: ‘Case 18...It was born at full term, though small, apparently healthy. At 3 days however, it began to get yellow and at the end of 3 weeks was very yellow. Her motions at no time after the second day appeared natural on examination, but were white, like cream, and her urine was very high coloured.’ 1855 was the year of Dr West's hospital note. An almost universally fatal diagnosis and it would remain so for the next 100 years. The time's primordial classification of biliary atresia afforded children with the 'noncorrectable' type, a complete absence of patent extrahepatic bile duct, an unfortunate label; they were beyond saving. Having discovered the extent of disease at laparatomy, the surgeons would normally close the wound. The venerable Harvardian surgeon, Robert E. Gross saved an enigmatic observation: “In most instances death followed a downhill course…” K-A-S-A-I read the ward’s board. It was scrawled under half the children's names. I dismissed it as just another devilishly hard acronym to forget. The thought of an eponymous procedure had escaped me and in biliary atresia circles, it's the name everyone should know: Dr Morio Kasai. Originating from Aomori prefecture, Honshu, Japan, Dr Kasai graduated from the National Tohoku University School of Medicine in 1947. His ascension was rapid, having joined the 2nd department of Surgery as a general surgeon, he would assume the role of Assistant Professor in 1953. The department, under the tenure of Professor Shigetsugu Katsura, shared a healthy interest in research. 1955 was the landmark year. Katsura and Kasai operated on their first case: a 72 day old infant. Due to bleeding at the incised porta hepatis, Katsura is said to have 'placed' the duodenum over the site in order to staunch the flow. She made a spectacular postoperative recovery, the jaundice had faded and there was bile pigment in her stool. During the second case, Katsura elected to join the unopened duodenum to the porta hepatis. Sadly the patient's jaundice did not recover, but the post-mortem conducted by Kasai confirmed the development of a spontaneous internal biliary fistula connecting the internal hepatic ducts to the duodenum. Histological inspection of removed extrahepatic duct showed the existence of microscopic biliary channels, hundreds of microns in diameter. Kasai made a pivotal assertion: the transection of the fibrous cord of the obliterated duct must contain these channels before anastomosis with the jejunal limb Roux-en-Y loop. This would ensure communication between the porta hepatis and the intrahepatic biliary system. The operation, entitled hepatic portoenterostomy, was first performed as a planned procedure for the third case at Tohoku. Bile flow was restored and Kasai published the details of the new technique in the Japanese journal Shujutsu in 1959. However, news of this development did not dawn on the West until 1968 in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. The success of the operation and its refined iterations were eventually recognized and adopted in the 1970s. The operation was and is not without its dangers. Cholangitis, portal hypertension, malnutrition and hepatopulmonary syndrome are the cardinal complications. While diagnosing and operating early (<8 weeks) are essential to the outcome, antibiotic prophylaxis and nutritional support are invaluable prognostic factors. Post operatively, the early clearance of jaundice (within 3 months) and absence of liver cirrhosis on biopsy, are promising signs. At UK centres the survival after a successful procedure is 80%. The concurrent development of liver transplantation boosts this percentage to 90%. Among children, biliary atresia is the commonest indication for transplantation; by five years post-Kasai, 45% will have undergone the procedure. On the 6th December 2008, Dr Kasai passed away. He was 86 years old and had been battling the complications of a stroke he suffered in 1999. His contemporaries and disciples paint a humble and colourful character. A keen skier and mountaineer, Dr Kasai lead the Tohoku University mountain-climbing team to the top of the Nyainquntanglha Mountains, the highest peaks of the Tibetan highlands. It was the first successful expedition of its kind in the world. He carried through this pioneering spirit into his professional life. Paediatric surgery was not a recognized specialty in Japan. By founding and chairing multiple associations including the Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons, Dr Kasai gave his specialty and biliary atresia, the attention it deserved. Despite numerous accolades of international acclaim for his contributions to paediatric surgery, Dr Kasai insisted his department refer to his operation as the hepatic portoenterostomy; the rest of the world paid its originator the respect of calling it the ‘Kasia’. Upon completion of their training, he would give each of his surgeons a hand-written form of the word ‘Soshin’ [simple mind], as he believed a modest surgeon was a good one. At 5 foot 2, Kasai cut a more diminutive figure one might expect for an Emeritus Professor and Hospital Director of a university hospital. During the course of his lifetime he had developed the procedure and lived to see its fruition. The Kasia remains the gold standard treatment for biliary atresia; it has been the shinning light for what Willis J. Potts called the darkest chapter in paediatric surgery. It earned Dr Kasai an affectionate but apt name among his peers, the small giant. References Miyano T. Morio Kasai, MD, 1922–2008. Pediatr Surg Int. 2009;25(4):307–308. Garcia A V, Cowles RA, Kato T, Hardy MA. Morio Kasai: a remarkable impact beyond the Kasai procedure. J Pediatr Surg. 2012;47(5):1023–1027. Mowat AP. Biliary atresia into the 21st century: A historical perspective. Hepatology. 1996;23(6):1693–1695. Ohi R. A history of the Kasai operation: Hepatic portoenterostomy for biliary atresia. World J Surg. 1988;12(6):871–874. Ohi R. Morio Kasai, MD 1922-2008. J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(3):481–482. Lewis N, Millar A. Biliary atresia. Surg. 2007;25(7):291–294. This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, April 2014 issue.  
James Wong
almost 7 years ago
12
2
95

Diabetes

Diabetes factsheet from WHO providing key facts and information on types of diabetes, symptoms, common consequences, economic impact, diagnosis and treatment, WHO response. Updated November 2014.  
who.int
about 6 years ago
Preview
2
103

Mitral Valve Stenosis Explained Clearly

Understand mitral valve stenosis and regurgitation with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult. Includes discussion on the signs and symptoms, diagnosis...  
youtube.com
almost 6 years ago
Preview
2
46

Pelvic Mass

Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis of Pelvic Mass from the Professional Version of the Merck Manuals.  
merckmanuals.com
almost 6 years ago
Preview
2
45

Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip - American Family Physician

Screening programs relying primarily on physical examination techniques for the early detection and treatment of congenital hip abnormalities have not been as consistently successful as expected. Since the 1980s, increased attention has been given to ultrasound imaging of the hip in young infants (less than five months of age) as a possible tool for improving patient outcomes. Although ultrasound examination may not provide advantages over careful repeated physician examination for universal screening, a growing body of evidence indicates that ultrasound surveillance of mild abnormalities can reduce the need for bracing without worsening outcomes. Radiographic documentation of hip normality after the femoral nucleus of ossification has appeared (at three to five month of age) is still appropriate to rule out hip dysplasia.  
aafp.org
almost 6 years ago
Preview
2
100

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases takes a comprehensive look at infectious diseases, their anatomic manifestations, and how to ensure a complete and accurate sign out at the microscope. A user-friendly chapter landscape and thousands of high-quality images combine to make this medical reference book a key companion for the general surgical pathologist or resident in training. Comprehensive discussions on how to sign out cases. Formatted into sections by organism type (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasite), and further divided by those that can be diagnosed on histological appearance. Species-specific pathologies for finding "zebra" cases.Essential information is listed in a bulleted format with numerous high-quality images to facilitate learning."Key Facts" highlight the quick criteria needed for diagnosis or adequacy evaluation at the time of a procedure.Features clear pictures of diagnostic forms, ancillary diagnostic tools, including microbiology and molecular diagnostics, pathological reaction patterns expected for given organisms, and important common and uncommon pathogens.Explains when and when not to use molecular diagnostics, and discusses histological limitations and how to address them at sign out.  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
125

Rheumatoid Arthritis: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Learn all about rheumatoid arthritis with our guide to symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatments  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
11

Tracheal Bronchus: High Resolution Computed Tomography diagnosis in a symptomatic patient

A 75-year-old female underwent a High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) scan for recurrent bronchitis and cough. HRCT images showed an anomalous supernumerary bronchus to the right upper lobe directly arising from the right side of distal trachea, corresponding to Tracheal Bronchus (TrB). TrB can cause recurrent right upper lobe pneumonia and special care is requiring during endotracheal intubation.  
ac.els-cdn.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
9

Colorectal cancer: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

We checked this guideline and decided that it should be updated. For details, see the update decision, decision matrix and the process for deciding if an update is needed. Details of the update will be available on the guidelines in development webpage in due course. No further checks of this guideline will be scheduled until this update is published.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
4

Metastatic spinal cord compression in adults: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

The guideline should cross refer to technology appraisal guidance 265, denosumab for the prevention of skeletal-related events in adults with bone metastases from solid tumours.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
12

Acute heart failure: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guideline offers evidence-based advice on the care and management of adults with acute heart failure or possible acute heart failure.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
16

Hypertension in adults: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

The guideline should not be updated at this time. For further information, please refer to surveillance review decision.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
17

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in over 16s: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

We checked this guideline and decided that it should not be updated at this time. For details, see the update decision, and the process for deciding if an update is needed.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
10

Meningitis (bacterial) and meningococcal septicaemia in under 16s: recognition, diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

We checked this guideline and decided that it should not be updated at this time. For details, see the update decision and the process for deciding if an update is needed. We have also removed reference to throat swabs from recommendation 1.3.14, to bring it into line with Public Health England’s Guidance for public health management of meningococcal disease in the UK.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
19

Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

We checked this guideline and decided that it should not be updated at this time. For details, see the update decision and the process for deciding if an update is needed.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
2

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in adults: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

We checked this guideline and decided that it should not be updated at this time. For details see the update decision, decision matrix and the process for deciding if an update is needed.  
nice.org.uk
over 5 years ago