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ECGs: Bradycardias

Written by Dr John L Gibbs, Consultant Paediatric Cardiologist, Yorkshire Heart Centre, Leeds General Infirmary. This presentation covers the many types of bradyarthymias, their ECG findings, investigation of them and finally some of the common treatment methods.  
Lara Gibbs
about 9 years ago
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Career Advice: Doctors and Medical Industries

Dr. Warren Hyer, Consultant Paediatrician, shares his advice on how best to achieve a successful medical career.  
YouTube
almost 4 years ago
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8
635

An introduction to pain pathways and mechanisms [Feb 2012]

Dr Danielle Reddi is a Pain Research Fellow and Speciality Registrar in Anaesthesia at University College London Hospital, London, NW1 2BU, Dr Natasha Curran is Consultant in Pain and Anaesthesia, UCLH and Dr Robert Stephens is Consultant in Anaesthesia, UCLH.  
ucl.ac.uk
over 2 years ago
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7
198

Fundoscopy in 5 min

Mrs Fiona Carley, Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital delivering a beginners guide to performing fundoscopy  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
D93c671ccead641a6d5f40f8d79a33b2
7
667

Thou shalt not doubt oneself in front of the patient

As part as my paediatrics attachment, I was having peripheral nervous system bed side teaching. We had spoken over the examination and I was first up to practice on 4 year old Jake. One consultant and 3 other medical students looked on as I worked my way through the examination. My general inspection and impression of the child got approving nods from my colleagues. Phew! Next up was actual exam “two people can’t resist…” I recalled in my head. First up, tone. I assessed this correctly and nothing had gone majorly wrong yet. Relief. Power was next. “ok, so put out your arms up like this and resist me…ok, no, not like that..erm..oh god…I don’t know how to explain it”. My colleagues looked on. The consultant chipped in “tell him to touch his shoulders”. It did the trick and I was able to get through the rest of the examination without too many hiccups. When we had finished, in classic med school fashion I had to reflect on what had just happened and then say something I did good and something I could have done better. My good thing was “I got through it..I mean I remembered everything”. My bad thing was “I wasn’t good at explaining power to him”. My feedback wasn’t the same as my bad thing though. My feedback was “be more confident. You did everything correctly and didn't forget anything. I think it’s a girl thing. You doubt yourselves more than the boys”. Next up was a male medical student’s turn. He did the examination just fine but there were things that I could pick out that he could have done better and being totally objective my examination was better. But there was a major difference. His confidence. He seemed like he knew what he was doing and when he went wrong or missed something out, he just added it to the end of his examination. If I were his examiner, I would have found it difficult to fault him. He appeared confident and as a patient that inspires confidence and a happy patient makes for a happy examiner and good marks. After the session, I got to thinking: am I really incompetent or am I just underestimating my own ability which is making me lack confidence? The fact that a paediatric consultant and all my colleagues told me that my examination was fine, good even, answers the first part. I am not incompetent. So I must be underestimating my own ability. And if I am, is that something that is unique to me? Or are other medical students doing that too? And more interestingly to me, is this something that the female medical students are doing more than their male colleagues?  
Salma Aslam
almost 4 years ago
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6
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Pediatric Cardiology- Basic Physics of Echocardiography

Pediatric Cardiology Teaching, Class, Lecture conducted by Dr Swati Garekar, Consultant Pediatric Cardiologist. The topic is - Basic Physics of Echocardiogra...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
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6
183

ECG Revision Lecture

Year 5 Revision Lecture by Dr. Rick Body Consultant in Emergency Medicine  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
9
6
131

Analgesia Podcast

In this audio podcast Dr Richard Jones talks to Dr Gareth Jones a consultant anaethetist about analgesia - as it is an informal discussion style it is easy to listen to and follow. More content can be found at www.surgeryandmedicine.com  
Rhys Clement
about 8 years ago
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3
115

Visual Fields in 5 min

Fiona Carley - Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon on Visual Fields. Please note that this short eLecture is on testing visual fields as part of an ophthalmology e...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
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4
135

Common Pediatric Fractures by Dr Monika Sharma, Consultant Radiologist.

Radiology teaching on Common Pediatric Fractures - Anatomy of Pediatric Bone.  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
1853e60a9389187a33829af731413488
9
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My transition from medical student to patient

I started medical school in 2007 wanting to 'making people better'. I stopped medical school in 2010 facing the reality of not being able to get better myself, being ill and later to be diagnosed with several long term health conditions. This post is about my transition from being a medical student, to the other side - being a patient. There are many things I wish I knew about long-term health conditions and patients when I was a medical student. I hope that through this post, current medical students can become aware of some of theses things and put them into practice as doctors themselves. I went to medical school because I wanted to help people and make them better. I admired doctors up on their pedestals for their knowledge and skills and expertise to 'fix things'. The hardest thing for me was accepting that doctors can't always make people better - they couldn't make me better. Holding doctors so highly meant it was very difficult for me to accept their limitations when it came to incurable long-term conditions and then to accept that as a patient I had capacity myself to help my conditions and situation. Having studied medicine at a very academic university, I had a very strict perception of knowledge. Knowledge was hard and fast medical facts that were taught in a formal setting. I worked all day and night learning the anatomical names for all the muscles in the eye, the cranial nerves and citric acid cycle, not to mention the pharmacology in second year. Being immersed in that academic scientific environment, I correlated expertise with PhDs and papers. It was a real challenge to realise that knowledge doesn't always have to be acquired through a formal educational but that it can be acquired through experience. Importantly, knowledge acquired through experience is equally valid! This means the knowledge my clinicians have developed through studying and working is as valid as my knowledge of my conditions, symptoms and triggers, developed through experiencing it day in day out. I used to feel cross about 'expert patients' - I have spent all these hours in a library learning the biochemistry and pharmacology and 'Joe Bloggs' walks in and knows it all! That wasn't the right attitude, and wasn't fair on patients. As an expert patient myself now, I have come to understood that we are experts through different means, and in different fields. My clinicians remain experts in the biological aspects on disease, but that's not the full picture. I am an expert in the psychological and social impact of my conditions. All aspects need to be taken into account if I am going to have holistic integrated care - the biopsychosocial model in practice - and that's where shared-decision making comes in. The other concept which is has been shattered since making the transition from medical student to patient is that of routine. In my first rotation, orthopaedics and rheumatology, I lost track within the first week of how many outpatient appointments I sat in on. I didn't really think anything of them - they are just another 15 minute slot of time filled with learning in a very busy day. As a patient, my perspective couldn't be more different. I have one appointment with my consultant a year, and spend weeks planning and preparing, then a month recovering emotionally. Earlier this year I wrote a whole post just about this - The Anatomy of an Appointment. Appointments are routine for you - they are not for us! The concept of routine applies to symptoms too. After my first relapse, I had an emergency appointment with my consultant, and presented with very blurred vision and almost total loss of movement in my hands. That very fact I had requested an urgent appointment suggest how worried I was. My consultants response in the appointment was "there is nothing alarming about your symptoms". I fully appreciate that my symptoms may not have meant I was going to drop dead there and then, and that in comparison to his patients in ICU, I was not as serious. But loosing vision and all use of ones hands at the age of 23 (or any age for that matter) is alarming in my books! I guess he was trying to reassure me, but it didn't come across like that! I have a Chiari malformation (in addition to Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Elhers-Danlos Syndrome) and have been referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss the possibility of neurosurgery. It is stating the obvious to say that for a neurosurgeon, brain surgery is routine - it's their job! For me, the prospect of even being referred to a neurosurgeon was terrifying, before I even got to the stage of discussing the operation. It is not a routine experience at all! At the moment, surgery is not needed (phew!) but the initial experience of this contact with neurosurgeons illustrates the concept of routines and how much our perspectives differ. As someone with three quite rare and complex conditions, I am invariable met in A&E with comments like "you are so interesting!". I remember sitting in the hospital cafeteria at lunch as a student and literally feasting on the 'fascinating' cases we had seen on upstairs on the wards that morning. "oh you must go and see that really interesting patient with X, Y and Z!" I am so thankful that you all find medicine so interesting - you need that passion and fascination to help you with the ongoing learning and drive to be a doctor. I found it fascinating too! But I no longer find neurology that interesting - it is too close to home. Nothing is "interesting" if you live with it day in day out. No matter what funky things my autonomic nervous may be doing, there is nothing interesting or fascinating about temporary paralysis, headaches and the day to day grind of my symptoms. This post was inspired by NHS Change Day (13th March 2013) - as a patient, I wanted to share these few things with medical students, what I wish I knew when I was where you are now, to help the next generation of doctors become the very best doctors they can. I wish you all the very best for the rest of your studies, and thank you very much for reading! Anya de Iongh www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk @anyadei  
Anya de Iongh
over 4 years ago
71349e910c9a4176d3777c81989ae38b
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Chronic: How one word can change everything

So, I think its about time I posted another blog post! A few weeks ago I received the results from my most recent scan. I was both nervous and excited to find out my results, after months of tests and being misdiagnosed several times I just wanted to know what was wrong with me. However, as I read through the letter from my consultant I realised that my journey was just beginning. I was diagnosed with a rare stomach condition. Gastroparesis. A chronic illness. There is no known cure, just various treatments with limited success. I didn’t really know how to react to this news. Shouldn’t I be happy that I finally knew what was wrong? I had convinced myself for months that as soon as the doctors found out what was wrong, they could fix it and I’d be better in no time, but this wasn’t to be. I couldn’t understand how this could happen. Slowly the reality began to sink in, I’ll probably be fighting this battle for the rest of my life. I think the mental aspect of chronic conditions is so commonly overlooked. I’ve sat through endless lectures about the pathophysiology of illnesses but I’ve never once stopped to think what it must be like to actually have it. The way it can limit your life, from not being able to go for a drink with friends because you’re in too much pain to the countless hospital appointments that your life seems to revolve around. The thing that hit me the most is the amount of medications I have to take on a daily basis just to make my symptoms bearable. I no longer have full control of my life and that's the worst part. This experience has given me an invaluable insight into how patients with chronic illness feel. It affects almost every aspect of your life and you can never escape. It scares me to think of the future, I never know when I’m going to get my next flare up or how long its going to last. I just have to take one day at a time and hope that when I wake up tomorrow I won’t be too nauseous. After spending a few weeks feeling down about it all, I’ve realised that I just have to enjoy life when I can and be grateful that I can still live a normal-ish life. It doesn’t matter how much I complain, it's not going to go away, and I think I’ve finally accepted that fact. If anything, this experience has made me more determined to achieve my dream of becoming a doctor. I’ve been a lot more motivated to work harder so that one day I can help others like me through some of their toughest times, hopefully bringing them some comfort and relief.  
Nicole Mooney
over 3 years ago
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Eponymous Syndromes

An A-Z list of syndromes named after the main protagonist (patient or doctor) involved in their discovery. So that hopefully when your consultant asks you will be able to give more than just a blank vacant look! =P N.B. Accepted answers don't require accents and often doesn't require the word 'syndrome'.  
Memrise
over 3 years ago
8
4
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Anaesthetic Principles

In this audio podcast Dr Richard Jones talks to Dr Gareth Jones a consultant anaethetist about the principles of anaesthesia - as it is an informal discussion style it is easy to listen to and follow. More content can be found at www.surgeryandmedicine.com  
Rhys Clement
about 8 years ago
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ECG Revision Lecture

Year 5 Revision Lecture by Dr. Rick Body Consultant in Emergency Medicine  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
10f8d3ebe679f366824783e2dbae9c95
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435

Points mean Prizes (and jobs)

Thousands of doctors are currently preparing portfolios and stressing about situational judgements as they go into core and specialty training interviews. As a medical student I wasn’t even aware when these interviews were and had only the briefest imaginings of what they might entail. Even at finals, specialty applications felt a million miles away; but it’s as if you’ve only just got through the misery of MTAS and you’re suddenly an F2 realising that the last 15 months have, to your surprise, disappeared. Yes, the interview is certainly a stressful situation, and for many medics it’s only the second ‘proper’ interview they’ve ever had. Time pressures, the scope of stations and performing under the watchful eye of the great and good of the medical profession only add to the stress. But, there are ways to make this process bearable, and, dare I say it, enjoyable (kind of). The most important step is preparation. Not just the preparation that starts in the days to weeks before the interview; this should be for refining your skills, getting your answers super-slick and getting to know yourself inside-out. Preparation starts at university (and no, which school you’re in doesn’t make a single difference). What the interviewers are looking for can be found in the person specification unique to each specialty (found at http://bit.ly/1eWF6aN). I.e. if you know you were born to perform heart surgery, start looking at what the interviewers for cardiothoracics are looking for. Even if you’re completely confused about your career path, it’s time to start thinking. Many specialties still have a short-listing stage dependent on the application form. Whether assessed on the form or at interview each specialty will (generally) award points for other/higher degrees, publications, presentations, prizes, teaching experience, audit and ‘commitment to specialty’. At the CT1/ST1 stage it doesn’t matter what subject area you published/presented/taught in etc. to score in that section; but having something relevant will help you discuss your commitment to that specialty. ‘Relevant’ in itself is misleading however; every experience is likely to be relevant when you identify the transferable skills involved and what you learned from the experience. Some specialties are stricter and you’ll need demonstrable evidence that you haven’t just applied on a whim. These tend to be the more competitive specialties which demand evidence you’ve had a really good look at what the job involves and have taken steps to broaden your knowledge. There is typically also at least one skills station which may be general (e.g. breaking bad news to a patient) or specialty-specific (e.g. interpreting images for radiology) but are still based on applicants demonstrating they fit the person specification. Many of the mark schemes are also freely available on the relevant Royal College website, and I encourage you to have a look and see where you could get a few more points (or give yourself a pat on the back that you couldn’t). It’s unlikely that the mark scheme/person spec. will be exactly the same every year, but the general overview is enduring. NB. The GP application is a bit different, but that’s for another post. The take home message is get involved early on, and be involved consistently. It may eat up some of your free time but you’ll appreciate it as soon as you look at the application form. If you’re struggling for practical ideas, take a look at the Royal College and specialty trainee websites for inspiration (some, for example the Royal College of Radiologists, have great audit ideas). The RSM and each medical school have a list of available prize essays and exams. A wise person once said to me “there’s no such thing as a wasted conversation”: Speaking to trainees and consultants about how they got to where they are not only gives you great insight into what they do but being friendly and enthusiastic can open up doors for you to help in audits and publications. And the final tip? Write everything down. Not only will this stand you in good stead as a safe doctor, but you’ll be surprised how much you can forget in a very short time. Then, unlike me, you won’t have to spend ages trying to think of reasonable examples of ‘when I dealt with stress’. Written by Lydia Spurr, FY3 Doctor Lydia is a Resident Meducation Blogger  
Dr Lydia Spurr
almost 4 years ago
Ffe88d0f94c0974f69cf280fd4a82d62
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Who is oPortfolio aimed at?

This is a post about oPortfolio - a project that Meducation and Podmedics are collaborating on. We have a Kickstarter project and would love your support! Students? Junior Doctors? Senior Doctors? Over the last two days we've been asked by lots of people who oPortfolio is for. Some people want it for students, others to replace junior doctor systems, and some for revalidation purposes. The simple answer is that it's for everyone going through their medical careers from student to consultant and on to retirement. Challenges There are two challenges to building a system that's relevant for such a wide variety of people. The first is to make something that has all the features that are needed for all the people. We are strong believers in self-directed learning and want that to be at the core of oPortfolio. We want people to be able to build their own personal portfolios, keeping a log of everything they want to - their own personal space for reflection and learning. oPortfolio should be something that you find useful at all stages, and that's crucial to our vision. The second challenge is working with existing ePortfolio systems, and to have functionality that deaneries and Colleges need to adopt our platform if they want to. Making a system that is incompatible with existing systems, or that involves doctors still having to use other horrible software defies the whole point of what we're doing. If a user's oPortfolio has to be manually copied & pasted into another system, everyone loses out. This, therefore, also has to be a large consideration as we move forwards. At all times, we will have to balance these two challenges up against each other. Conclusion oPortfolio is for everyone. It certainly won't have all the features that everyone needs from day one, but our aim is to build a solid base everyone can use, and then expand it from there. With regards to who we give our initial focus to, it will be the people who support us on Kickstarter. They are showing genuine support for what we're doing, and therefore deserve to be prioritised. That only seems fair. Please support us today. Thank you.  
Jeremy Walker
over 4 years ago
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Pediatric Cardiology-Pregnancy in patients with heart disease

Pediatric Cardiology Teaching,lectures conducted by Dr Sangeetha Viswanathan- Consultant Interventional Pediatric Cardiologist MRCPCH(UK), CCST Pediatric Car...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
Www.bmj
1
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Why would a consultant think of going into management?

The NHS is keen to encourage more senior doctors to move into management, but few make the leap. Not only is there an “us and them” culture but the risks are far too high. Richard Vize reports  
bmj.com
almost 3 years ago
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Balance between GP and hospital doctor numbers may need to shift, says new NHS chief

Workforce numbers among general practitioners have not risen as quickly as those of hospital consultants despite a shift in the NHS to provide more care outside hospitals, the new head of the NHS in England has said.  
www.bmj.com
over 3 years ago