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8f0a7f4f4b806d5fbc07c218c3bc078bab6cb2fb08951574676538243
21
1302

GI tract diseases

Simplified drawing for the pathologies affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Each color refers to a disease (start from the key of colors).  
nedaa kiwan
over 2 years ago
E319a0654de8a9dad54789d7945eb301e504807f4206472905499006
9
293

Cranial nerve nuclei in brainstem (schema)

One of my professors made this schema long time ago. I drew it again to add some colour. It helped me a lot to memorize everything. :)  
Sigyn
over 2 years ago
Preview
7
228

TeachMeAnatomy - Making Anatomy Simple

Containing over 700 vibrant, full-colour images, TeachMeAnatomy is a comprehensive anatomy encyclopedia presented in a visually-appealing, easy-to-read format.  
teachmeanatomy.info
over 3 years ago
0cf57ac2f6bcc17aa0bc3a107739f2f7
9
337

Death by Powerpoint.

Introduction Computerised presentations are a part of every medical student's / junior doctor's life. Sometimes we give them, often we sleep through them and occasionally we even listen to them. They are the backbone of medical education besides traditional bed-side teaching, having rapidly replaced the now extinct OHR (Over Head Projector) acetate-sheet presentations of years gone-by. The problem is that Doctors and medical students often struggle with creating and presenting coherent slides. This is most probably due to the general apathy most have for actually talking in front of an audience, or because those asked to present are often taken unawares, and therefore have little time to prepare. In these times of avolition or last-minute hurriedness, people often reach out for the industry standard of presentation production: PowerPoint. PowerPoint is the most commonly used tool for making presentations because it is simple to use and comes with a whole load of free templates. Unfortunately, most of these templates look disgusting. If a template doesn't look disgusting, then it is most certainly overused and you run the risk of having a presentation that looks identical to the student before you at the weekly seminar teaching - a scenario that can be easily likened to turning up to a lecture wearing exactly the same clothes as another person in the room, which would just be awkward. Another problem with PowerPoint is the phenomenon of 'Death By Powerpoint,' which refers to the general boredom and apathy experienced by those who have received way too much information in way too short a space of time via a series of over-cramped, poorly stylised slides. But why on earth do you care? People should care about 'Death By Powerpoint' because if your presentations cause people to zone out, then you are not getting your message across. And if you aren't getting your message across then you. are. not. presenting. at. all. (take a moment to reflect on that particularly Zen statement). Let me explain using a metaphor, if I am a sales person and I present my talk with well-designed slides, in an enthusiastic and well-rehersed manner to an appropriate audience I will make more sales than if I present using poorly designed slides at the last minute. Similarly, in Medicine if I present well designed, aesthetic slides I am more likely to convey accurate information to my colleagues that may very well be retained and enjoyed by all involved. Of course, this blog assumes a degree of presentation-related Altruism. The recommendations I am about to make require you to 'step out of the mould' and say 'no' to poor presentations. They require you to forgive others for the presentations they have inflicted on you in the past. You will 'lead by example'. Unfortunately I am not capable (or qualified) to make you an excellent designer, nor can I give you the motivation to feel as passionately about design aesthetics as i do when all you've got to do is slam some slides together for your monthly journal club. But what I can do is present to you a series of resources that might tempt you away from the horrific PowerPoint templates that currently infest medical student seminars and young doctors presentations. If you really couldn't care less, then I suggest using Prezi, a website where you can make quite eccentric looking presentations rapidly and for free. The only problem is that Prezi became cliched even before its debut and you risk inflicting travel sickness on your poor audience, what with all the funky zooming in and out of slides that occurs during a typical Prezi presentation (you will know what I mean if you've ever seen one). So, without further ado, here are my top 5 tips for making your presentations look smoother and more polished... Irrespective of whether the contents of your talk are any good. Step One: Typography Get yourself a good font. Typography is really important, when you speak to someone you use a variety of tones and gestures to convey the meaning of the words you are using. Fonts are effectively the printed version of your tone and gestures. Good font choice can help give 'umph' to a particular point in your presentation and help give character to what you are saying. Of course, it's important to remain professional so 'Wingbats' might not be your first choice, but anything that you could envisage on a nice business card is probably a good shout. Fonts are usually something you have to pay for if you want anything beyond the set given to you when you download Microsoft Word (for example). However, there are whole hosts of free fonts available from sites like [dafont])(http://www.dafont.com). The key is to be willing to trawl through these sites to find fonts that are actually useful! Beware those fancy fonts unless you know your audience can take it! If you are stuck on choosing a font, which is a common complaint, then maybe this flow diagram will help! Oh yeah, and never ever use Comic Sans. Ever. Step Two: Colour A good font isn't going to get you very far on its own. You need a solid colour scheme to bring your presentation alive. It seems blunt to say, but some people are not very good at picking colours that go well with one another. This is well evidenced in PowerPoint presentations where the yellow-text-on-blue-background is far too common. I mean yeah, in theory blue and yellow 'compliment' each other, but thats where the relationship between blue and yellow should stay... in theory. Luckily there are some useful colour palette websites available out there, which will match colours for you... Step Three: Structure After you've picked a sensible font and a suitable colour scheme, it's time to think about the structure or layout of your slides. It's absolutely crucial that you avoid putting too much information on your slides even if you are giving an academic presentation. An overloaded slide is about as useful as a dead cat. At this point, some of you may be tempted to resort to those dodgy PowerPoint default templates but there is another way! There are sites out there that have some pretty fresh templates you can use and they are completely free! They are sure to add a bit of spice to your slide's aesthetic. There will probably be a separate tutorial on this in the future, but basic principles apply. As a general rule stick to Left Alignment *and avoid *Central Alignment like the plague. Step Four: Imagery Images help to spice up a presentation, but try and keep them related to the topic. Google Images is a great resource but remember that most images will be a low resolution and will be poorly suited to being shown blown up full-size on a presentation screen. Low resolution images are a presentation killer and should be avoided at all costs. For high-quality images try sites like Flikr or ShutterStock. Step Five: Consider Software The interface of Powerpoint does not lend itself well to having images dropped in and played with to make nice looking layouts. I would recommend Adobe Photoshop for this kind of work, but not everyone will have access to such expensive software. Cheap alternatives include Photoshop Elements amongst others. Once you have created slides in Photoshop it is quick and easy to save them as JPEG files and drag and drop them into PowePoint. Perhaps that can be a tutorial for another time... Step 5: Additional Stuff Presentations typically lack significance, structure, simplicity and rehearsal. Always check over your presentation and ask 'is this significant to my audience?' Always structure your presentation in a logical manner and (it is recommended you) include a contents slide and summary slide to tie things together. Keep your verbal commentary simple and keep the slides themselves even more simple than that. Simplicity is crucial. Once you have produced your beautiful slides with wonderful content you will want to practice them. Practice, Practice, Practice. Rehearsing even just once can make a good presentation even better. Conclusion: This blog entry has covered some basic points on how to improve your medical presentations and has given a series of useful online resources. Putting effort into designing a presentation takes time and motivation, for those without these vital ingredients we recommend Prezi (whilst it is still relatively new and fresh). Perhaps the rest of you will only use these tips for the occasional important presentation. However, I hope that soon after you start approaching presentations with a little more respect for their importance and potential, you too will find a desire to produce high-quality, aesthetically pleasing talks. LARF - Mood: damn tired and feeling guilty that I just wrote this blog instead of revising haematology notes. Follow me on Twitter. Follow the Occipital Designs original blog. Check out my Arterial Schematic.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 4 years ago
Preview
3
73

The Complete Guide to Vascular Ultrasound

This volume is a comprehensive how-to guide to ultrasound evaluation of vascular pathology. The book provides both the technical know-how and the analytical skills needed to obtain the maximum information from examinations and to accurately diagnose a given problem. Chapters provide detailed coverage of abdominal vasculature, peripheral arteries, hemodialysis and bypass grafts, peripheral veins, penile vessels, and the cerebrovascular system. Each chapter includes sections on anatomy, pathology, questions to ask the patient, examination techniques, diagnostic analysis, and other diagnostic tests related to the clinical problem. More than 100 full-color Doppler images demonstrate the full spectrum of pathologic findings.  
Google Books
over 2 years ago
11
2
46

Chronic Abdominal Pain

<p>This podcast addresses chronic abdominal pain in children. It gives medical students an approach to the history and physical examination in chronic abdominal pain and discusses the role of investigations. 'Red Flag' findings on history and physical exam are stressed. We specifically discuss Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Peptic Ulcer Disease, Constipation, Lactose Intolerance and Functional Abdominal Pain.&nbsp;<span style="font-size: 11px; color: #333333;">This episode was written by Peter MacPherson and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and Stollery Children's Hospital. She is also the Clerkship Director.&nbsp;</span></p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 7 years ago
8
3
118

Altered Level of Consciousness

<p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">This episode covers an approach to children with altered level of consciousness. &nbsp;We present an approach to the initial management in these cases, with a focus on the ABC and DFG approach. Investigations and imaging are discussed. Some specific causes of altered LOC are covered. &nbsp;This episode was written by Peter MacPherson and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and Stollery Children's Hospital. She is also the Clerkship Director.&nbsp;</span></p <p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">~~~</span></p <p><!--StartFragment--></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Times;"><span style="font-size: small;"> <!--StartFragment--> </span></span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Differential Diagnosis of Altered Level of Consciousness:</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">1) Structural causes: cerebrovascular accident, cerebral vein thrombosis, hydrocephalus, intracerebral tumor, subdural empyema, trauma (intracranial hemorrhage, diffuse cerebral swelling, abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome)</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">2) Medical causes: anoxia, diabetic ketoacidosis, electrolyte abnormality, encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, infection (sepsis), inborn errors of metabolism, intussusception, meningitis or encephalitis, psychogenic, postictal state, toxins, uremia (hemolytic-uremic syndrome)</span></p <div style="border: none; border-bottom: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;" <p class="MsoNormal" style="border: none; mso-border-bottom-alt: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Adapted from: Avner J (2006) Altered states of consciousness. <em>Pediatr Rev</em></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> 27: 331-338.</span></p </div <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 7 years ago
Preview
2
44

Color Atlas and Text of Pulmonary Pathology

Thoroughly updated for its Second Edition, this comprehensive, profusely illustrated text/atlas covers the full range of pulmonary pathology, including common, rare and newly described diseases, both neoplastic and non-neoplastic. The book presents a multimodality approach to diagnosis, integrating cytologic, radiologic, surgical, and clinical pathologic features of each disease. By combining carefully chosen color illustrations with lists of distinguishing features of each entity, this text/atlas provides a quick path to accurate diagnosis. This edition features updated sections on pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary hemorrhage, lung transplantation, and pediatric pulmonary pathology, including new classification and grading systems. Throughout the book, new entities and new images have been added. An online image bank provides instant access to all the book's illustrations.  
Google Books
almost 3 years ago
Preview
2
54

Pleural Effusion Explained Clearly | 3 of 3

Learn the key points of pleural effusions with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult. Video 3 of 3 includes discussion on pleural fluid analysis (color...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
6
2
33

Evaluation of limp

<p><span style="font-size: 11px; color: #333333;">This podcast gives students an approach to the evaluation of limp in children and provides an oveview of a number of common or serious causes of limp. &nbsp;This podcast was written by Peter MacPherson and &nbsp;Dr. Janet Ellsworth. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Ellsworth is the Divisional Director of pediatric rheumatology at the Stollery Children&rsquo;s Hospital in Edmonton and a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content at www.pedscases.com.</span></p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 7 years ago
12
2
27

human-body-anatomy-subway-map-image

Anyone who’s ever taken an anatomy class knows just how hard it can be to get to grips with our complicated bodies. This simple and fun depiction of the human body makes memorizing all the bits that keep us alive fun. The colour coordinating and playful representation of  
Urban Times
over 3 years ago
29748
2
45

Cranial Nerves Examination - Normal

Orientation, Memor Asking questions about month, date, day of week and place tests orientation, which involves not only memory but also attention and language. Three-word recall tests recent memory for which the temporal lobe is important. Remote memory tasks such as naming Presidents, tests not only the temporal lobes but also heteromodal association cortices. Attention-working memory Digit span, spelling backwards and naming months of the year backward test attention and working memory which are frontal lobe functions Judgement-abstract reasoning These frontal lobe functions can be tested by using problem solving, verbal similarities and proverbs Set generation This is a test of verbal fluency and the ability to generate a set of items which are frontal lobe functions. Most individuals can give 10 or more words in a minute. Receptive language Asking the patient to follow commands demonstrates that they understand the meaning of what they have heard or read. It is important to test reception of both spoken and written language. Expressive language In assessing expressive language it is important to note fluency and correctness of content and grammar. This can be accomplished by tasks that require spontaneous speech and writing, naming objects, repetition of sentences, and reading comprehension. Praxis The patient is asked to perform skilled motor tasks without any nonverbal prompting. Skills tested for should involve the face then the limbs. In order to test for praxis the patient must have normal comprehension and intact voluntary movement. Apraxia is typically seen in lesions of the dominant inferior parietal lobe. Gnosis Gnosis is the ability to recognize objects perceived by the senses especially somatosensory sensation. Having the patient (with their eyes closed) identify objects placed in their hand (stereognosis) and numbers written on their hand (graphesthesia) tests parietal lobe sensory perception. Dominant parietal lobe function Tests for dominant inferior parietal lobe function includes right-left orientation, naming fingers, and calculations. Non-dominant parietal lobe function The non-dominant parietal lobe is important for visual spatial sensory tasks such as attending to the contralateral side of the body and space as well as constructional tasks such as drawing a face, clock or geometric figures. Visual recognition Recognition of colors and faces tests visual association cortex (inferior occiptotemporal area). Achromatopsia (inability to distinguish colors), visual agnosia (inability to name or point to a color) and prosopagnosia (inability to identify a familiar faces) result from lesions in this area.  
Neurologic Exam
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
19

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Color fundus photograph of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy showing reintal hemorrhages, yellow lipid exudates, and dull white cotton…”

“Color fundus photograph of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy showing reintal hemorrhages, yellow lipid exudates, and dull white cotton wool spots…”  
Instagram
over 3 years ago
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1
13

Histology

A brief but effective presentation of comparative histology for veterinary students, interns or residents reviewing for their specialty board exams or for a practitioner looking for an excellent quick reference source. This 100 page presentation boasts 39 chapters covering normal histology of the domestic animals and commonly seen exotics. Over 95 original full color drawings clearly and accurately present the normal morphology and organ differentiation of tissues. The presentation on classical embryology is especially helpful to student first learning this information. It is consistent with the Quick Look series, containing over 100 multiple choice questions to aid understanding. The well integrated CD-ROM contains over 250 full color tissue specimens which serve to further understanding on the topic.Published by Teton New Media in the USA and distributed by Manson Publishing outside of North America.  
Google Books
almost 3 years ago
9c2acd4690f2a59636fb7944b191e5aa
6
155

'THE F***-IT BUTTON'

It is Julian Bagginis' book, 'The Virtues of the Table: How to Eat and Think', that is fuelling me to write. I am particularly drawn to the chapter 'Willpower and Weight-loss' and would like to dedicate my first blog-entry to the ‘F**** -it-button’; the antithesis of willpower and thus.. weightloss. The ‘F***-it button’ is a useful concept for any -visually minded- [medical] student that in an attempt to lead the perfect [medic] lifestyle of ‘work hard-play hard' (whilst focusing on eating that all-important 'balanced diet' and exercising regularly)... ... ends up ‘working hard but playing harder', finds themselves eating the leftover cake in the nurses’ room (in order to gain that much-needed energy to sit in a clinic), and ditches the gym in favour of Facebook. In sum, the ‘F***-it button’ is that imaginary ‘button’ –definitely red in colour- that is available for any individual to press at any time, BUT is only pressed on occasion, for which there is usually a 'trigger' (an emotion or event that 'forces' you to do it). Once pressed, willpower and self-control are fully deactivated. The individual is free to do as they will. As you can imagine, the ‘F***-it button’ can be applied to anything... However, for me, this button is most often activated when trying to be 'healthy' and lead that balanced lifestyle. In this context, ‘F***-it button' 'initiation’ does not mean the breakfast that when portioning a bowl of cereal, a handful of flakes is ‘allowed’ to reach the mouth before the bowl... We are talking about total and utter blowout. Examples include: Having THE healthiest day EVER- planned to perfection- and then rewarding oneself with a night in a cocktail bar or a ‘few’ beers to celebrate the ‘day of healthiness’. (Usually on a Sunday) Finishing the week’s worth of ‘healthy’ food you stocked up to eat that week, you get a lil bit peckish at about 5p.m, about the time Sainsbury’s closes, and low and behold, you find yourself entering a housemate’s (sorry!) cupboard and demolishing their chocolate biscuits… the ‘walk of shame’ in the form of a ‘replacement trip’ to Sainsbury’s follows the next day, or if Sainsbury’s is open, promptly. That day when you are absolutely ravenous at 10.30am, lunch is too far away but you will not survive the morning… the only option is a chocolate bar or other high calorie snack… lunchtime comes but you are not hungry due to that cheeky snack BUT by mid-afternoon- maybe just as you are about to clerk a patient- you are ravenous, and a trip to the nurse’s room for a cake ‘to keep you going’ is inevitable. In all three cases, by this time you may as well give up completely, throw off all restrictions and eat whatever you like for at least the next week… you will eat everything and anything that comes to your mind, and it will involve numerous visits to the ‘chocolate shop’ (provided the cravings come before 11pm).* The ‘F***-it button’ has been pressed. In a way, I do love the ‘F***-it’ button conception; it allows a period of freedom to indulge, in a mood dependent fashion, in what you want, when you want to. However, it is very much a love-hate relationship.. eating the nurses cake is undoubtedly essential for those times when you need a ‘pick me up’ but regularly doing so leaves you unpopular, with tight trousers and intense feelings of guilt. The ‘hate’ part of the relationship is the reason I want to consider why it is that the‘F- it’ button exists. I have been informed by various ‘dieting’ websites that certain triggers, for example fatigue will trigger certain impulse responses, for example ‘F- it button’. This is a situation most of us can recognize… you really want to lose weight but faced with the temptation of the nurse’s cake on a day you feel tired, your desire for the cake, only needs to overrule your weight-loss resolution for a minute (or so) and all your good intentions are crushed, as the cake finds its way to your mouth. How is it that some of my friends – you know the type (my housemate)- can have one cookie of a packet of fifteen, and the other fourteen remain on their desk (or cupboard for that matter), next to where they are working, in full view, where they can smell, see and think about it, for at least half a year before they decide to have Biscuit Number Two, and ONLY Biscuit Number Two. This I just do not understand. My mind is put at ease- to an extent – by the knowledge gained from my new ‘bible’, ‘that experiments with toddlers show that even at a very young age, some people are able to resist or defer gratification better than others’. I was definitely NOT one of those toddlers… Baggini goes on to say that this matters more than just for weight loss: having good self-control is a very strong predictor of academic career and success… Hmm, I think we will leave it at that. *Chocolate shop as defined as the nearest newsagents or supermarket.  
Catherine Bruce
over 3 years ago
Preview
1
8

29 Students Of Colour At Cambridge And SOAS Launch Their Own Campaigns To Share Their Experiences At University

Students from Cambridge and the School of Oriental and African Studies have taken inspiration from initiatives by black and ethnic minority...  
BuzzFeed
over 3 years ago
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1
16

Professional Guide to Pathophysiology

Professional Guide to Pathophysiology, Third Edition, combines the best of a diseases reference with the best of a full-color atlas in one clinical reference for every practice setting. This comprehensive guide focuses on the pathophysiologic developments behind more than 400 disorders across all body systems, so the practitioner fully understands the pathophysiologic rationale behind focused assessments, behind patient signs and symptoms, behind the kinds of tests that are done, and behind the treatments that are given. Now in full color throughout, the book features hundreds of illustrations depicting anatomical structures and pathophysiological processes, as well as scores of informative tables and flowcharts. P&gt;  
Google Books
almost 3 years ago
Boiled spinach
0
12

Episode 10 – Pediatric GI Emergencies

Episode 10 (iTunes or listen here) The Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) We review Dr. Natalie May's brilliant post on the St. Emlyn's blog, "When Sick Means Sick: Emesemantics and Vomiting in Kids"  in which she dissects emesis descriptors such as bilious, projectile, and coffee-ground. The Pearls: Ask for color descriptors or look at the emesis yourself rather…  
foamcast.org
over 2 years ago
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1
10

What Colour is a Dead Chameleon? - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 18th Dec 2011 - What Colour is a Dead Chameleon?  
thenakedscientists.com
over 3 years ago
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1
5

IRS TAX TIPS & RESOURCES

Tax is the membership cost, levied by the government, for being part of a society. The money is taken from you and spent on a number of services which are considered to be in your interest - and every few years you can choose what colour rosettes the people who take this money from you will be wearing. There are a number of different forms of tax, with each country (and in some cases each state) having its own rules. In the UK, tax is mainly in 3 forms:  
Themeefy
over 3 years ago