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CauseOfDeath

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7
1
44

Focus On: Emergent Evaluation and Management of Bacterial Meningitis

Bacterial meningitis is defined as infection of the arachnoid mater, subarachnoid space, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).1 It is among the most common infectious causes of death in the world.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
almost 9 years ago
11
1
15

Traumatic Rhabdomyolyisis / Crush Syndrome

Crush syndrome is a common cause of death following earth quakes, mine and building collapses. Traumatic rhabdomyolysis may also be seen following electrical injury or severe trauma. (This is a reposting due to some previous technical problems with the server.)  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
almost 9 years ago
4
5
83

Sepsis - Part 1

<div class="postBody">Sepsis is a common cause of death in the intensive care unit.&nbsp; In this episode I present some of the statistics on septic deaths, introduce the definitions, and present the basic science.&nbsp; Part 2 will cover fluid and drug therapy for septic shock.&nbsp; </div>  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
almost 9 years ago
Preview
4
136

Breast Cancer

Remember, although rare, men can also get breast cancer. Less than 1% of breast cancers occur in men. Benign breast masses are 15x more common than breast cancer   Epidemiology In the UK, a woman has a 1/9 chance of developing breast cancer It is the most common cause of death in women aged 35-55  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
2
68

Prostate Cancer

  By the age of 80, >80% of men have prostate cancer It is the second most common cancer in men, and the 4th most common cause of death for men in England and Wales. Rates of prostate cancer are particularly low in Asians, and particularly high in African Americans and Scandinavians. The tumours are adenomas and are usually located in the peripheral prostate.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
16

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Inducing hypothermia after out of hospital cardiac arrest

Out of hospital cardiac arrest is common and is associated with a high rate of mortality.1 With early ambulance treatment, about 30% of these patients have a return of spontaneous circulation and are transported to hospital. However, many patients remain comatose owing to hypoxic brain injury, and this is the leading cause of death after hospital admission.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
20

Antibiotics to promote growth in children?

Overt infections are a leading cause of death worldwide in children under 5,1 and strategies to prevent and treat infections are a cornerstone of child survival programmes. Recent assessments suggest that despite a net increase in the size of birth cohorts, the number of children dying before their fifth birthday has fallen to 6.6 million (uncertainty range 6.3-7.0 million) per year, a 45% reduction from almost 12 million deaths in 1990.2 In contrast, the fall in undernutrition has been modest at best. An estimated 165 million children under 5 were stunted in 2011 and an estimated 52 million severely wasted; almost 45% of the current burden from child mortality in under 5s can be attributed to malnutrition.3 Although many risk factors for early child mortality are well recognised, the mechanisms underlying chronic enteropathy and growth failure among children in low and middle income countries remain uncertain.4  
www.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
21

Antibiotics to promote growth in children?

Overt infections are a leading cause of death worldwide in children under 5,1 and strategies to prevent and treat infections are a cornerstone of child survival programmes. Recent assessments suggest that despite a net increase in the size of birth cohorts, the number of children dying before their fifth birthday has fallen to 6.6 million (uncertainty range 6.3-7.0 million) per year, a 45% reduction from almost 12 million deaths in 1990.2 In contrast, the fall in undernutrition has been modest at best. An estimated 165 million children under 5 were stunted in 2011 and an estimated 52 million severely wasted; almost 45% of the current burden from child mortality in under 5s can be attributed to malnutrition.3 Although many risk factors for early child mortality are well recognised, the mechanisms underlying chronic enteropathy and growth failure among children in low and middle income countries remain uncertain.4  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
3
130

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
17

Inducing hypothermia after out of hospital cardiac arrest

Out of hospital cardiac arrest is common and is associated with a high rate of mortality.1 With early ambulance treatment, about 30% of these patients have a return of spontaneous circulation and are transported to hospital. However, many patients remain comatose owing to hypoxic brain injury, and this is the leading cause of death after hospital admission.  
bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
17

Up to 40% of premature deaths in US are preventable, says CDC

If all US states achieved the same death rates for the top five causes of death—heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, and unintentional injury—as those achieved by the states with the lowest rate for each cause, 20% to 40% of premature deaths in the United States could be prevented, the Centers …  
www.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

Coding a million deaths in India, one interview at a time

A huge 10 year study assigns cause of death by verbal autopsy, giving information essential for informing health policy, writes Meera Kay  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
17

Global child health: Why kernicterus is still a major cause of death and disability

Stream Global child health: Why kernicterus is still a major cause of death and disability by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
15

Global child health: Why kernicterus is still a major cause of death and disability

Stream Global child health: Why kernicterus is still a major cause of death and disability by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
9

Most common cause of death in England and Wales in 2013 was heart disease in men and dementia in women

The leading cause of death among men in England and Wales in 2013 was ischaemic heart disease, accounting for 15.4% of deaths, while among women it was dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which caused 12.2% of deaths, show the latest statistics.1 Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease overtook heart disease as the leading cause of death among women in 2012.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
10

Most common cause of death in England and Wales in 2013 was heart disease in men and dementia in women

The leading cause of death among men in England and Wales in 2013 was ischaemic heart disease, accounting for 15.4% of deaths, while among women it was dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which caused 12.2% of deaths, show the latest statistics.1 Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease overtook heart disease as the leading cause of death among women in 2012.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
29

Resuscitating drowned children

The World Health Organization published its global report on drowning in November 2014, reporting a staggering 372 000 deaths a year from all types of water immersion. Worldwide, drowning is in the top 10 causes of death in children and young people, particularly in males and those aged under 5. An estimated 21 children and young adults are drowned every hour.1 Other public health matters have had disproportionately greater attention, despite the numbers of deaths from drowning being equivalent to two thirds of global deaths from malnutrition and over one half of deaths from malaria.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago