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Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
19

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
www.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
10

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
6

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
www.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
6

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
10

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
15

'Marijuana refugees' give cannabis to epileptic children - BBC News

Parents in the US with severely epileptic children are turning to cannabis for treatment. The BBC went to Colorado, the US state which has legalised the drug, to meet the self-described 'marijuana refugees'.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
13

Crowdfunding sought for study that will provide first images of human brain on LSD

The neuropsychopharmacologist who was sacked as the UK government’s adviser on drugs after he argued against tougher laws on cannabis and ecstasy is trying to raise crowdfunding to support research into the effects of LSD on the brain.  
bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
37

High potency cannabis

A recent study by Di Forti and colleagues suggests that daily use of “skunk”— cannabis with high levels of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and low levels of cannabidiol—is a contributory cause of schizophrenia.1 The study compared patterns of cannabis use in first episode cases of psychosis and matched controls recruited from areas in south London. It found equally high rates of cannabis use in cases and controls, but cases were three to five times more likely to report daily use of skunk than controls, and this association persisted after statistical adjustment for confounders. The researchers estimated that one in four new cases of schizophrenia in this area of London were attributable to skunk, if the association is causal.  
bmj.com
almost 4 years ago
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1
21

Marijuana: Risk or Remedy? - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 24th Feb 2015 - Marijuana: Risk or Remedy?  
thenakedscientists.com
almost 4 years ago
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73

Pearls of Wisdom

If I had a penny, okay a pound, for every time a patient responded to the request to practice examining them said, 'Well, we all gotta learn', I would be a very rich medical student. (I'd like to add that this is said in a strong West-country accent, just so that you feel like you're really there.) I'm sure that the majority of my colleagues would agree. Today has been no different except for the fact that one of the patients I met described themselves as a 'whistleblower'. It was like my subconscious slapping me around the face and telling me to stop procrastinating. Why, you ask? Well I'm starting to get a little nervous actually, in exactly two weeks I'll be presenting my thoughts on whistleblowing (you might remember me going on about this during dissertation season) to a load of academics and healthcare professionals. My sphincters loosen up at the thought of it* Within five minutes of meeting this patient, they had imparted their wise words on me 'Chantal, just remember when you become a doctor - if you're absolutely sure that you're right about something then never be afraid to speak up about it.' Like music to my ears. Well, until he told me that he was convinced that 'cannabis cures all ills.' Each to their own. *I sincerely apologise, poor medic joke. Yuck. Written by Chantal Cox-George, 3rd Year Med Student at University of Bristol  
Chantal Cox-George
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
14

High potency cannabis

A recent study by Di Forti and colleagues suggests that daily use of “skunk”— cannabis with high levels of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and low levels of cannabidiol—is a contributory cause of schizophrenia.1 The study compared patterns of cannabis use in first episode cases of psychosis and matched controls recruited from areas in south London. It found equally high rates of cannabis use in cases and controls, but cases were three to five times more likely to report daily use of skunk than controls, and this association persisted after statistical adjustment for confounders. The researchers estimated that one in four new cases of schizophrenia in this area of London were attributable to skunk, if the association is causal.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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0
6

Most Americans say medical marijuana shouldn't be used by kids or in front of kids

4 in 5 people say adults shouldn't be allowed to use medical marijuana in front of children; support of patient use much lower for kids than adultsMedical marijuana and...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
8

Medical marijuana for children with developmental and behavioral disorders?

Despite lack of evidence, some are advocating cannabis for children with autism, reports Journal of Developmental and Behavioral PediatricsAs medical marijuana...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
2

Trends down for teen prescription opioid abuse, cigarette, and alcohol use

Use of cigarettes, alcohol, and abuse of prescription pain relievers among teens has declined since 2013 while marijuana use rates were stable, according to the 2014 Monitoring the Future (MTF)...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
4

Simultaneous drinking and smoking marijuana increases odds of drunk driving

Cannabis is the most commonly used drug among adults who drink, besides tobacco, yet no study has directly compared those who use cannabis and alcohol simultaneously, or at the exact same time...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
6

NYU study identifies teens at risk for hashish use

The recent increase in popularity of marijuana use coupled with more liberal state-level polices has begun to change the landscape of adolescent marijuana use.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
4

Marijuana: The allergen you never knew existed

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
5

How cannabis use affects people with Bipolar Disorder

The first study to examine the use of cannabis in the context of daily life among people with Bipolar Disorder has shown how the drug is linked to increases in both manic and depressive...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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0
5

Review finds 'significant link' between cannabis use and onset of mania symptoms

Researchers from the University of Warwick have found evidence to suggest a significant relationship between cannabis use and the onset and exacerbation of mania symptoms.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago