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Animation of Initiation of Atherosclerosis - Macrophage Activation 1

This animation shows a simplified version of the macrophage's role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In an atherosclerotic-prone blood vessel, macrophages invade the subendothelial space. Oxidised Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) present within the vessel wall will bind to scavenger receptors on the macrophage's surface, such as CD36. This will activate the macrophage, and it will phagocytose the oxLDL. As this process continues, the macrophage increases in size and forms a Foam Cell, which is too large to pass between the endothelial cells back into the lumen. Therefore, the foam cells remain in the subendothelial space and are the main cells present within an atherosclerotic plaque. *** Done for Student Selected Component (SSC), University of Aberdeen. Year 2. 2011. Made in Adobe Photoshop CS2 and Adobe Imageready.  
Victoria Lee
over 6 years ago
717cc0aacdc643eb001436c3ee3520a6
16
679

Exam Survival Guide

1. Sleep (I realize I’m posting this at 12:30 am…) (http://www.helpguide.org/life/sleep_tips.htm) I know there’s a popular perception of sleep deprivation going hand in hand with working hard or succeeding academically. However, that is only true if you’re working very last minute, and don’t care about retaining the information–you basically just want to get through your upcoming test/assignment. I would like to clarify that, although learning about 10 months of material in 2 weeks is overwhelming, it is NOT last minute because whatever you’re working on right now, you’ll have to remember in 2 weeks for your exam. Besides the exam, if you’re studying medicine, you need to remember most of these things for the rest of your life. In order to retain that information, you need to stay alert, well rested and motivated. Prolonged sleep deprivation can make you feel very ‘CBA’ very fast. 2. Stay Energized Sleep is only one factor in staying motivated and alert; another is staying energized¬–in a healthy way. Simply put: if you feel well, you’ll work well. Eat well: difficult, I know, when you’ve got so little time to spare; but as much as you can, try to eat more whole foods (aka things that don’t come in wrappers or have their own commercial) and keep a balanced diet (too much of anything is usually not good). Everyone snacks while they’re doing exams, but try to find a vice that won’t put you in a sugar coma (some good examples include berries and other fruits, nuts, carrots with hummus to dip in, granola bars, etc). Note: drinking tea is also an excellent way to stay energized! Stay active: Again, I know something like this is difficult to keep up in normal everyday life, let alone during exam stress. Even if it is just for 15-20 minutes, some cardio (note: the more strenuous the workout in a short period of time, the more benefit you’ll get) is a fantastic ‘eye-opener’ (I learned that phrase while learning how to take an alcohol history and now I really like it)! No one wants to go for a run in the morning, but after you get past the first 2-3 minutes of wanting to collapse, your body starts to feel really grateful. This is the BEST way to stimulate your senses and wake yourself up. I promise it’s better than any energy drink or cup of coffee you could have. Take small breaks: SMALL breaks!!! About 10 minutes. Every once in a while, you need to get up and walk around to give yourself a break, have some fresh air, grab a snack, but try not to get carried away; try to avoid having a short attention span. 3. Make Lists I cannot stress enough how counterproductive it is to overwhelm yourself with the amount of work you have. Whether you think about it or not, that pile is not going anywhere. Thinking about it won’t wish it away. Stop psyching yourself out and just get on with it– step by step. Making a list of objectives you need to accomplish that day or week is a great way to start; then, cross them out as you go along (such a satisfying feeling). Being able to visualize your progress will be a great motivator. Remember: it is important to be systematic with your studying approach; if you jump around between modules because they’re boring you’re just going to confuse yourself and make it hard to remember things when that exam comes Note: I have a white board in my room where I write my objectives for the week. Some days it motivates, some days it I want to throw it out the window (but I can't reach the latch)… 4. Practice Questions Practice questions are excellent for monitoring your progress; they’re also excellent at scaring you. Do not fear! This is a good thing, because now you know what you’re missing, go back and read up on what you forgot to take a look at, and come back and do the questions later. Then give yourself a sticker for getting it right ? Practice questions are also great for last minute studying too because they can help you do what I call “backwards studying”–which is what I just described: figuring out what you need to learn based on what the questions look like. 5. Be realistic Set realistic goals for yourself; most importantly, set realistic daily goals for yourself so that when you get all or most or even some of them done you can go to sleep with a level of satisfaction. Also, you need to pick your battles. Example: if you suck at neuro, then one module’s loss is another’s gain. Don’t spend too much time trying to get through one thing, just keep moving forward, and come back to it later 6. ‘Do not disturb’ Facebook, twitter, instagram, youtube, whatsapp, texting, pinterest, meme websites, so many fantastic ways to kill your time… Do yourself a favor, save them for your breaks. If someone is dying or on fire, they will most likely call you, not text you or write on your wall; you do not need to check your phone that often unless you're expecting something time sensitive. 7.Don’t Compare Everyone studying in your program is going to be stressed about things; do NOT let it rub off on you. You know those moments when you hear a peer or a prof/tutor describing something you have never even heard of, then you start panicking? Yeah, don’t do that. It happens to everyone. Instead of worrying so much, just go read about it! Simple solution right? What else are you going to do? Plus, a lot of the time other students seem to know more than they need to about certain things (which I can tell you right now, doesn’t always mean they’re doing better than you; knowing random, very specific factoids doesn’t mean they can bring it in clinic. Everyone can pull a Hermione and know a book inside out, but this is not necessarily the hallmark of a good doctor), what’s it to you? Worry about yourself, be confident in your abilities, and don’t trouble yourself with comparing to other people 8.Practice for Practicals Everyone is afraid of practical exams, like the OSCE (at any rest station you're likely to find me with my head in my hands trying to stabilize my breathing pattern and trying not to cry). The best way to be ready is to practice and practice and practice and practice. It’s like learning to drive a car. At first you’re too aware of your foot on the gas, the position of your hand on the wheel, etc; but, after driving for a little while, these things become subconscious. In the same way, when you walk into a station, you could be so worried about how you’ll do your introduction and gain consent, and remembering to wash your hands, and getting equipment and and and and and; the anxiety affects your confidence and your competence. If you practice enough, then no matter what they throw at you, you will get most of the points because the process will be second nature to you. Practice on your roommates, friends, family members, patients with a doctor's help...when appropriate... Even your stuffed animals if you're really desperate. DO NOT leave practicing for these practicals to the last minute; and if you do, make sure you go through every thing over and over again until you’re explaining examinations in your sleep. NOTE: When I'm practicing for OSCE alone, I record myself over and over again and play it back to myself and criticize it, and then practice againn. 9.Consistency You don’t necessarily have to study in the same place every day; however, it is always good to have some level of routine. Some examples include: waking up/sleeping at the same time everyday, going for a run at the same time every day, having the same study routine, etc. Repetition is a good way to keep your brain focused on new activities because, like I said before, the more you repeat things, the more they become second nature to you. Hope these tips are of some use to you; if not, feel free to sound off in the comments some alternate ways to get through exams. Remember that while exams are stressful, this is the time where you build your character and find out what you’re truly capable of. When you drop your pen after that final exam, you want to feel satisfied and relieved, not regretful. Happy Studying ?  
Mary
over 4 years ago
29985
14
721

Animation of Initiation of Atherosclerosis - Macrophage Activation 2

This animation shows a simplified version of the macrophage's role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In an atherosclerotic-prone blood vessel, macrophages invade the subendothelial space. Oxidised Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) present within the vessel wall will bind to scavenger receptors on the macrophage's surface, such as CD36. This will activate the macrophage, and it will phagocytose the oxLDL. As this process continues, the macrophage increases in size and forms a Foam Cell, which is too large to pass between the endothelial cells back into the lumen. Therefore, the foam cells remain in the subendothelial space and are the main cells present within an atherosclerotic plaque. *** Done for Student Selected Component (SSC), University of Aberdeen. Year 2. 2011. Made in Adobe Photoshop CS2 and Adobe Imageready.  
Victoria Lee
over 6 years ago
Preview
12
341

Shock: Keeping it simple

Very simple guide to the different types of shock, and rough management. Taking it back to basics!  
Amy Huxtable
over 4 years ago
Preview
8
285

Lego Surgery - Crohn's Disease, Small Bowel Resection

Welcome back to the LEGO Operating Room! In this episode, Dr Balfour discusses surgery for Crohn's Disease and explains the operation of a small bowel resect...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
Preview
3
105

OSCE Clinical Skills -Pregnant abdomen

Sample from 'Ace the OSCE' a Prize Winning OSCE Video Library. 100% Pass rate by subscribers last year and 100%Money Back Guarantee you pass your OSCEs! Real Patients with Real Signs (& standardised patients too). Includes a Handbook with detailed notes on each video. Winner of 1st Prize at the British Medical Association 2009 Book Awards: Electronic Media category. Subscribe Now at www.AceMedicine.com  
OSCE Videos
almost 4 years ago
Preview
7
86

Looking Back At Today's Healthcare From The Future in 2050 - The Medical Futurist

A lot of people ask me about the future of medicine and healthcare. What’s coming next, what about the future of radiology, genomics or health sensors. They ...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
2
70

Neuro exam of the upper limb

Neurological Examination of the Upper Limbs for OSCE Revision Constructive feed back is always appreciate  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview
2
68

Neuro exam of the lower limbs

Neurological Examination of the Lower Limbs for OSCE Revision Constructive feed back is always appreciate  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview 300x225
6
195

Immunology & Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia)

An interactive learning resource that explores the life cycle of the Schistosoma mansoni parasite and how it exploits the human immune system in order to survive. All links are back up and running. Please let me know if you experience any diffuclties. Thank you!  
Daniel Sapier
over 6 years ago
Preview
3
89

Lumbar Disk Disease

Your lumbar spine, or low back, is made of five vertebrae separated by cushioning disks of cartilage. Degenerative conditions or trauma can damage a disk, al...  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
Preview
2
70

Exercises for a Healthy Back

Most people will have back pain at some time in their lives. These exercises will show how to stretch out some of the common pain causing muscles.  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
11
2
84

Back • AnatomyZone

3D video anatomy tutorials to help you revise the musculoskeletal structures of the back.  
anatomyzone.com
about 2 years ago
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3
37

Knee exam

Constructive feed back on these videos is always appreciated  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
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3
46

Fifth Disease

Fifth Disease - so called as it was the fifth of the six common childhood skin rashes when it was first classified back in the 18th and 19th centuries. Formally known as Erythema Infectiosum and also colloquially called slapped cheek syndrome. Aietiology and Epidemiology  Caused by infection with Parvovirus B19 (aka erythrovirus)    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
Preview
1
40

Hip exam

Constructive feed back on all our videos is always appreciated  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview
1
128

Duke Anatomy - Lab 22: Retropharyngeal space

In the last lab you examined many of the structures on the anterior surface of the neck, and looked briefly at the retropharyngeal space and its contents while moving them aside, but you have not yet dissected those structures in detail. Today you will explore the prevertebral area and the back of the pharynx (retropharyngeal space) in much more detail. In order to do this the head must be detached from the vertebral column to allow a posterior approach to the cervical viscera. This is a challenging and labor-intensive dissection.  
web.duke.edu
over 2 years ago
11344d32362f43bb83049b40f85f9198
7
197

Early Retirement and Career Change

This is my first blog on Meducation. I decided to tell the reader a bit about myself, so that future blogs will make sense. At age 48 and in an active and successful academic practice of OB & GYN, my best friend died from a complication of cardiac surgery. This tragic event made my wife's and me consider other things in life than just work, thus at age 55, I decided to retire from my academic position and to start working as a locum in many different cultural settings. The plan was to work somewhere in an area of need for six months and alternate this with travel for six months. It did not quite work out exactly that way, but close enough. I worked in Japan, then Pakistan, Tasmania, Australia, New Zealand, Alaska, St Lucia, and Chiapas in Mexico. Much earlier I had had a two year experience in Africa. It was a very satisfying experience and my wife and I have never looked back. Many of my friends and colleagues kept urging me to write a book about our experiences and how we accomplished them. For a long time I kept resisting, probably because I felt that no one might be interested, and because I might have been lazy, and most likely for both of these reasons. I finally gave in, started writing and published an e book. The title is "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path." the book can be down loaded for free from Smashwords at: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522 The book is meant for medical as well as non medical people. It is written as a series of loosely connected anecdotes, some medical, some non medical, some funny, some not so funny. The book describes the immense satisfaction my wife and I experienced from our decision and I hope that reading the book might inspire others, medical or non medical people, who might be thinking about a career change or early retirement to jump of the beaten path. The book might also inspire other with similar experiences to write about them. I would love to receive some comments. William J. LeMaire JUNE 2014 Learn more about me please visit my website at: http://www.freewebs.com/wimsbook  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
56d856b670301accdbdd229f7344d65d
7
162

Hypo-Politicosis

Hypo-politicosis = A behavioral condition where political thought and action is dangerously below an optimal range. Leading to the ostrich phenomenon of delusionary belief that there is nothing outside of medicine. In an age of ever great openness, communication and democratic rights, the population of the western world is disengaging with political ideology, political debate and political engagement. This disengagement is nowhere more prevalent than in the UK. The total membership of all the political parties are at the lowest since they were formed. There are less trade unionist today than a century ago. And most importantly the proportion of people that vote regularly is at an all-time low. Surely, this is a sign of a dysfunctional democracy? Can we truly call it a democracy if the state’s citizens have no interest or control over how the state is run? What worries me even more than this dire situation, is the lack of interest in politics from fellow medical students. If you were to sit in a bar in a medical school city, I am sure you would be able to hear groups of medical students unwinding over a pint and discussing some political issues. But those political issues almost always evolve around medicine, such as abortion laws, public health initiatives, doctor’s pay and the re-structuring of the NHS. This insular mind set worries me because there is more to life than medicine! And while so much of our lives may be taken up with the learning and practice of medicine, our lives will be affected by so much more, and before medical school we all had to take an interest in so much more just to get an interview. Do you remember having the time and inclination to take an interest in something that wasn’t medicine? Like reading history or poetry? This insular mindset is detrimental because it means that as a demographic group we may not engage as fully as we should do with the rest of society, this could be bad for us but more importantly bad for the greater society. If medics become too disengaged in the greater political debates then we may find that society decides that doctors are easy targets and easy scapegoats. We may find our working lives extended, our social lives curtailed, our pensions decimated and our earning power diminished because we did not engage with the public and discuss these issues openly. We may also lose influence with the government if medics don’t vote for their local MPs, question their local party officials and fight our corner over important issues via the BMA. The other side of this coin is that medics are selected from some of the brightest in the country, educated at great expense by the state, trained and employed by the state and pay a huge amount of tax to the state. If we engage in politics less then society as a whole may suffer from a lack of highly intelligent, highly educated individuals, who should hopefully have a strong social conscience and interest in well run state, from putting their thinking skills to good use on societal problems. Dr Liam Fox is a conservative back-bench MP and use to be in the shadow cabinet. He has used the skills he developed as a doctor to try and follow an evidence based political career. He recently released a book called “Rising tides” (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rising-Tides-Facing-Challenges-New-ebook/dp/B00CUE0DKQ) which analyses many of the world’s current political issues and I would highly recommend as many people as possible read it. I also hope that in future I can walk into a bar, meet some medical colleagues and talk about an issue that affects more of society than just medics! How about using a scientific approach to discuss how Britain’s education system could be improved? Or how Britain could use its welfare resources better to decreased homelessness (which would also reduce a burden on A and E’s)?  
jacob matthews
almost 4 years ago
Preview
1
131

AMINO ACIDS & PROTEINS by Professor Fink

Review of Biological Chemistry, including Amino Acids and Proteins. Reference is made to the globular structure of the protein, denaturation back into a poly...  
YouTube
over 3 years ago