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AutisticDisorder

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Autism Screening Tutorial

Tutorial on evaluating for signs of autism in toddlers, produced by Help Autism Now Society.  
OSCE Videos
over 4 years ago
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US firms give autistic workers a chance to shine - BBC News

Autistic people have historically struggled to find and keep jobs, but with as many as one in 68 American children being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. The Specialists Guild, a non-profit group in San Francisco, is working to prepare people with autism for jobs in the technology industry.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
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Admiring Autism: Busting 'autism myths' with a camera - BBC News

Photographer Sara Dunn is "challenging the myths surrounding autism" with a camera, her own son and other affected families.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
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WHO | World Health Assembly progress on noncommunicable diseases and traditional medicine

The 67th Health Assembly approved plans to better incorporate palliative care, expand inclusion of the needs of those affected by autism, improve access to health care for those with disabilities, better integrate the use of traditional medicine and raise awareness of psoriasis.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
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Monkey See, Monkey Do.

So you're sitting in a bus when you see a baby smile sunnily and gurgle at his mother. Your automatic response? You smile too. You're jogging in the park, when you see a guy trip over his shoelaces and fall while running. Your knee jerk reaction? You wince. Even though you're completely fine and unscathed yourself. Or, to give a more dramatic example; you're watching Titanic for the umpteenth time and as you witness Jack and Rose's final moments together, you automatically reach for a tissue and wipe your tears in whole hearted sympathy ( and maybe blow your nose loudly, if you're an unattractive crier like yours truly). And here the question arises- why? Why do we experience the above mentioned responses to situations that have nothing to do with us directly? As mere passive observers, what makes us respond at gut level to someone else's happiness or pain, delight or excitement, disgust or fear? In other words, where is this instinctive response to other people's feelings and actions that we call empathy coming from? Science believes it may have discovered the answer- mirror neurons. In the early 1990s, a group of scientists (I won't bore you with the details of who, when and where) were performing experiments on a bunch of macaque monkeys, using electrodes attached to their brains. Quite by accident, it was discovered that when the monkey saw a scientist holding up a peanut, it fired off the same motor neurons in its brain that would fire when the monkey held up a peanut itself. And that wasn't all. Interestingly, they also found that these motor neurons were very specific in their actions. A mirror neuron that fired when the monkey grasped a peanut would also fire only when the experimenter grasped a peanut, while a neuron that fired when the monkey put a peanut in its mouth would also fire only when the experimenter put a peanut in his own mouth. These motor neurons came to be dubbed as 'mirror neurons'. It was a small leap from monkeys to humans. And with the discovery of a similar, if not identical mirror neuron system in humans, the studies, hypotheses and theories continue to build. The strange thing is that mirror neurons seem specially designed to respond to actions with clear goals- whether these actions reach us through sight, sound, smell etc, it doesn't matter. A quick example- the same mirror neurons will fire when we hop on one leg, see someone hopping, hear someone hopping or hear or read the word 'hop'. But they will NOT respond to meaningless gestures, random or pointless sounds etc. Instead they may well be understanding the intentions behind the related action. This has led to a very important hypothesis- the 'action understanding' ability of mirror neurons. Before the discovery of mirror neurons, scientists believed our ability to understand each other, to interpret and respond to another's feeling or actions was the result of a logical thought process and deduction. However, if this 'action understanding' hypothesis is proved right, then it would mean that we respond to each other by feeling, instead of thinking. For instance, if someone smiles at you, it automatically fires up your mirror neurons for smiling. They 'understand the action' and induce the same sensation within you that is associated with smiling. You don't have to think about what the other person intends by this gesture. Your smile flows thoughtlessly and effortlessly in return. Which brings us to yet another important curve- if mirror neurons are helping us to decode facial expressions and actions, then it stands to reason that those gifted people who are better at such complex social interpretations must be having a more active mirror neuron system.(Imagine your mom's strained smile coupled with the glint in her eye after you've just thrown a temper tantrum in front of a roomful of people...it promises dire retribution my friends. Trust me.) Then does this mean that people suffering from disorders such as autism (where social interactions are difficult) have a dysfunctional or less than perfect mirror neuron system in some way? Some scientists believe it to be so. They call it the 'broken mirror hypothesis', where they claim that malfunctioning mirror neurons may be responsible for an autistic individual's inability to understand the intention behind other people's gestures or expressions. Such people may be able to correctly identify an emotion on someone's face, but they wouldn't understand it's significance. From observing other people, they don't know what it feels like to be sad, angry, surprised or scared. However, the jury is still out on this one folks. The broken mirror hypothesis has been questioned by others who are still skeptical about the very existence of these wonder neurons, or just how it is that these neurons alone suffered such a developmental hit when the rest of the autistic brain is working just dandy? Other scientists argue that while mirror neurons may help your brain to understand a concept, they may not necessarily ENCODE that concept. For instance, babies understand the meaning behind many actions without having the motor ability to perform them. If this is true, then an autistic person's mirror neurons are perfectly fine...they were just never responsible for his lack of empathy in the first place. Slightly confused? Curious to find out more about these wunderkinds of the human brain? Join the club. Whether you're an passionate believer in these little fellas with their seemingly magical properties or still skeptical, let me add to your growing interest with one parting shot- since imitation appears to be the primary function of mirror neurons, they might well be partly responsible for our cultural evolution! How, you ask? Well, since culture is passed down from one generation to another through sharing, observation followed by imitation, these neurons are at the forefront of our lifelong learning from those around us. Research has found that mirror neurons kick in at birth, with infants just a few minutes old sticking their tongues out at adults doing the same thing. So do these mirror neurons embody our humanity? Are they responsible for our ability to put ourselves in another person's shoes, to empathize and communicate our fellow human beings? That has yet to be determined. But after decades of research, one thing is for sure-these strange cells haven't yet ceased to amaze and we definitely haven't seen the last of them. To quote Alice in Wonderland, the tale keeps getting "curiouser and curiouser"!  
Huda Qadir
over 4 years ago
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Autism and Alzheimer's

We strive to educate people on natural solutions to health.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Balanced behavior with IRBIT

Regulating hyperactivity and social interactionsHyperactivity and social abnormalities are defining characteristics of ADHD and autism, two developmental disorders...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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A brain system that appears to compensate for autism, OCD, and dyslexia

Individuals with five neurodevelopmental disorders -- autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, dyslexia, and Specific Language Impairment -- appear to...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Medical marijuana for children with developmental and behavioral disorders?

Despite lack of evidence, some are advocating cannabis for children with autism, reports Journal of Developmental and Behavioral PediatricsAs medical marijuana...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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'Master regulator' gene - long tied to autism disorders - stimulates other genes in early brain development

Chemical modifications to DNA's packaging - known as epigenetic changes - can activate or repress genes involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and early brain development, according to a...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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MMR vaccine and autism: study finds 'no harmful association'

In a study of more than 95,000 children, researchers found no link between the MMR vaccine and greater risk of autism, even among children at higher risk for the condition.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Violent video games not linked to aggression in adults with autism

Effects of violent games on aggression are similar for adults with and without autism, study findsFollowing the 2012 shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, some in the media...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Autism: new studies investigate diagnosis time and identify epigenetic signatures

Across two new studies, Johns Hopkins and Oregon State researchers identify epigenetic variations associated with ASD in parental sperm and assess diagnosis time for ASD children.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Maternal gestational diabetes linked to autism risk for offspring

A new study suggests that exposure to gestational diabetes while in utero could increase the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder for children.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Study finds gestational diabetes associated with greater risk of autism in children

Children whose mothers developed gestational diabetes by the 26th week of pregnancy were at increased risk of developing autism later in life, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Autism's early neuronal 'neighborhood'

SDSU scientists find that in children with autism, sensorimotor regions of the brain become overconnected at the expense of later-developing higher-order functionsIn...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Could story-based video games help people with autism?

New research finds that nonviolent, story-based games may boost players' 'theory of mind' - the ability to accurately assess other people's mental states.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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'Autism discovery' - brain imaging reveals language development differences

Brain scans of toddlers, done before any childhood diagnosis on the autism spectrum, reveal a language-development discovery, and raise new research hopes, say neuroscientists.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Discovering the relationship between autism and epilepsy

Researchers at the University of Veracruz (UV), in the west coast of Mexico, study the neurobiological link between the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and epilepsy, in order to understand the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago
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Mighty microexons take center stage in shaping of the brain

Complex brain disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, still puzzle scientists because their causes lie hidden in early events of brain development, which are still poorly understood.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 3 years ago