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AtrialFibrillation

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17

Focus On: Atrial Fibrillation - Rhythm Control Options in the Emergency Department

Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. It is characterized by an irregular narrow complex rhythm, with an atrial rate of approximately 400-700 beats per minute and a ventricular rate of 100-180 beats per minute.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
over 8 years ago
0
2
35

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation is a common problem in ICU patients, but it is a problem with many potential causes, and not always a well defined treatment.   
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 8 years ago
30052
0
20

Atrial Fibrillation tutorial

This is a video tutorial on atrial fibrillation for medical students produced by Podmedics. This overview highlights the epidemiology, pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis and basic principles of management.  
Podmedics
about 7 years ago
Preview 300x212
3
21

The quality of life pre and post cardioversion in patients with Atrial fibrillation

A retrospective study of AF patients that had undergone successful Cardioversion at Wigan hospital was carried out. Data from 50 cardioverted patients was obtained from the hospital database and questionnaires regarding their quality of life (QoL) before and after Cardioversion were posted to them. The data was collected and a comparison was made between scoring of patients before and after undergoing Cardioversion.  
Nadia Jaberansari
about 6 years ago
Preview
11
242

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation - latest guidelines  
Khairul Azhar Abu Bakar
about 6 years ago
10
7
141

ECG Interpretation - Atrial Fibrillation & Flutter

http://www.acadoodle.com Atrial fibrillation is the commonest cardiac arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. In this condition, chaotic electrical impulses, generated from multiple sites within the atria and pulmonary veins, result in irregular depolarisation of the ventricles with a resulting irregularly irregular heartbeat. Recognition of atrial fibrillation on the ECG is a crucial skill as the arrhythmia increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. These complications are preventable with appropriate treatment. Atrial flutter is a common arrhythmia which arises by a very specific mechanism. This arrhythmia is easily missed on the ECG. Acadoodle.com is a web resource that provides Videos and Interactive Games to teach the complex nature of ECG / EKG. 3D reconstructions and informative 2D animations provide the ideal learning environment for this field. For more videos and interactive games, visit Acadoodle.com Information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information provided by Acadoodle.com and associated videos is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs.  
ECG Teacher
almost 5 years ago
Preview
2
15

Atrial Fibrillation

 
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
33

Digoxin

Digoxin is a cardiac glycoside, which have two main effects: Increases the force of contractions (through increased intracellular Ca2+) Reduce conduction through the AV node   It is most commonly used to control AF and atrial flutter, and in some cases, digoxin may also be used in heart failure.   Digoxin in Atrial fibrillation  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 4 years ago
Preview
14
598

Atrial Fibrillation Symptoms & Treatments

NorthShore University HealthSystem Cardiac Electrophysiologists Wes Fisher, M.D., Jose Nazari, M.D. and Alex Ro, M.D. discuss atrial fibrillation.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
16

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
9

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
8

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
3
115

Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
81

Intro to EKG Interpretation - Overview of Tachyarrhythmias

Mechanisms, etiologies, and EKG characteristics of sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, multifocal atrial tachycardia, supraventricular ta...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
Preview
2
16

Anticoagulation strategies for Atrial Fibrillation [UndergroundMed]

For more videos, check out our website at: http://videos.undergroundmed.net  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
18

Sudden onset double vision

An 83 year old woman was admitted to the acute stroke unit with sudden onset double vision that had lasted for three hours. She had a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and atrial fibrillation, for which she was not receiving anticoagulation because of an adverse reaction to warfarin. She had no history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. She had diplopia only when looking through her right. On examination she was unable to adduct her left eye, with nystagmus in her right eye when she attempted to do this. Her neurological examination was otherwise normal. Computed tomography of the head on admission was normal, as was magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which was requested the next day. Figure 1⇓ shows T2 weighted (A) and diffusion weighted (B) sequences at the level of the upper pons.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
10

Sudden onset double vision

An 83 year old woman was admitted to the acute stroke unit with sudden onset double vision that had lasted for three hours. She had a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and atrial fibrillation, for which she was not receiving anticoagulation because of an adverse reaction to warfarin. She had no history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. She had diplopia only when looking through her right. On examination she was unable to adduct her left eye, with nystagmus in her right eye when she attempted to do this. Her neurological examination was otherwise normal. Computed tomography of the head on admission was normal, as was magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which was requested the next day. Figure 1⇓ shows T2 weighted (A) and diffusion weighted (B) sequences at the level of the upper pons.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
7

Sudden onset double vision

An 83 year old woman was admitted to the acute stroke unit with sudden onset double vision that had lasted for three hours. She had a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and atrial fibrillation, for which she was not receiving anticoagulation because of an adverse reaction to warfarin. She had no history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. She had diplopia only when looking through her right. On examination she was unable to adduct her left eye, with nystagmus in her right eye when she attempted to do this. Her neurological examination was otherwise normal. Computed tomography of the head on admission was normal, as was magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which was requested the next day. Figure 1⇓ shows T2 weighted (A) and diffusion weighted (B) sequences at the level of the upper pons.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
11

Sudden onset double vision

An 83 year old woman was admitted to the acute stroke unit with sudden onset double vision that had lasted for three hours. She had a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and atrial fibrillation, for which she was not receiving anticoagulation because of an adverse reaction to warfarin. She had no history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. She had diplopia only when looking through her right. On examination she was unable to adduct her left eye, with nystagmus in her right eye when she attempted to do this. Her neurological examination was otherwise normal. Computed tomography of the head on admission was normal, as was magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which was requested the next day. Figure 1⇓ shows T2 weighted (A) and diffusion weighted (B) sequences at the level of the upper pons.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
9
336

Atrial Fibrillation Animation

Educational animated video that describes atrial fibrillation.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago